Oracle software can run on Windows Server Hyper-V and in Windows Azure

Microsoft and Oracle promised last week that a major announcement would be made today, and the two large tech companies did not disappoint. The new partnership between Microsoft and Oracle covers a number of enterprise-based agreements, including a way for Oracle software to run on Windows Server Hyper-V and in Windows Azure.

Microsoft's press release states that the software from Oracle that can run on Microsoft's platforms include Java, Oracle Database and Oracle WebLogic Server. Microsoft will also offer Oracle's software lineup to its Windows Azure customers. Oracle will make its Oracle Linux OS available to Windows Azure users; specific financial terms of this new partnership were not disclosed.

Steve Ballmer is quoted as saying that this new agreement with Oracle will allow its customers "... to take advantage of the flexibility our unique hybrid cloud solutions offer for their Oracle applications, middleware and databases, just like they have been able to do on Windows Server for years." Oracle President Mark Hurd is also quoted as saying, "This collaboration with Microsoft extends our partnership and is important for the benefit of our customers."

Oracle's press announcement on this partnership includes new support notes on running its software on Windows Server Hyper-V as well as running Oracle Linux OS on Windows Azure.

Source: Microsoft | Image via Microsoft and Oracle

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with so many free options out there, no one cares anymore a million dollars for oracle db for a business with 200-300 people, yeh right, that time is over

Noone used a million dollars oracle db for 200-300 people (or rather, connections), ever. And yes, noone will, either, but thank you, captain. And rest assured, Oracle and MSSQL are doing pretty well. MySQL (insert random fork here) may be free, but it won't change the fact that it's an awful pile of steaming goatsh*t. PostgreSQL seems to be the only good choice, but guess what, support's not free there either (of course), plus open source projects seem to largely ignore it (such as WordPress, to name a big one).

Edited by bviktor, Jun 24 2013, 11:57pm :

Oracle costs around $50K/CPU and a CPU on Oracle gets you a lot of power. A million would get you a huge DB server. You can get away with a free option if you put a couple 100K a year into people that know how to tinker with it and get it to perform. I'd rather pay people to work on the business functions than the core database functions.

john.smith_2084 said,
with so many free options out there, no one cares anymore a million dollars for oracle db for a business with 200-300 people, yeh right, that time is over

Doesn't Oracle own the IP on the most popular of those free options?

Scroogled said,
Doesn't Oracle own the IP on the most popular of those free options?

Depends on what you consider 'IP' given that pretty much all the big names own patents in database technology and the projects controlled such as MySQL have GPL portions and proprietary components that aren't necessary for their operation.

Next step is running Oracle as a PaaS option in the Windows Azure SQL Database service, but I wonder if Oracle would ever go for that even if Microsoft passed on a majority of the revenues from the service to Oracle in licensing fees.

Microsoft is loading up on Data Centers (Devices & Services right???)...
And they don't care that another OS other than Windows is loaded onto them... as long as someone is loading something on to them...

This is a Win/Win for both... Oracle has servers... But they don't have em' on a level like Microsoft is doing right now..

Microsoft can now advertise to businesses that need Oracle, that their Azure Cloud can run Oracle products on Windows Servers...

sphbecker said,
Exactly, I am not sure I have ever seen a real Oracle DB running on Windows, even non-production, it just isn't done.

Technically it would be the Oracle RDBMS running in the Oracle Linux distro in a VM on Windows (Azure)

Big question I have is how does the licence pricing compare to normal Oracle licences, which are obscene

sphbecker said,
Exactly, I am not sure I have ever seen a real Oracle DB running on Windows, even non-production, it just isn't done.

I've seen quite a few Windows installs. Unix is generally preferred for big scale but a lot of small stuff is done on Windows.

Sraf said,

Technically it would be the Oracle RDBMS running in the Oracle Linux distro in a VM on Windows (Azure)

Big question I have is how does the licence pricing compare to normal Oracle licences, which are obscene

Unless they designate Hyper-V as a hard partitioning technology, you have to license all the CPUs on the box. They don't care about the OS.

I know they don't care about the OS, but part of the appeal of using Azure is the dynamic scalability of the system, which would be severely hampered by Oracle's standard licensing scheme

Sraf said,
I know they don't care about the OS, but part of the appeal of using Azure is the dynamic scalability of the system, which would be severely hampered by Oracle's standard licensing scheme

Oh, you're talking about the cloud platform and not just running Linux under Hyper-V on your own hardware. I would assume they're going to license it like Amazon EC2 where you pay for the number of virtual CPUs allocated to the VM.

EDIT: It looks like Azure is in the authorized cloud platform document now. I'm not sure if that just happened or not: http://www.oracle.com/us/corpo.../cloud-licensing-070579.pdf