Paper Battery Offers Future Power

Flexible paper batteries could meet the energy demands of the next generation of gadgets, says a team of researchers. They have produced a sample slightly larger than a postage stamp that can release about 2.3 volts, enough to illuminate a small light. But the ambition is to produce reams of paper that could one day power a car. Professor Robert Linhardt, of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, said the paper battery was a glimpse into the future of power storage.

The team behind the versatile paper, which stores energy like a conventional battery, says it can also double as a capacitor capable of releasing sudden energy bursts for high-power applications. While a conventional battery contains a number of separate components, the paper battery integrates all of the battery components in a single structure, making it more energy efficient.

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News source: BBC News

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Great, one more death nell for the rainforests. Sometimes a technology takes off just because we can do it, but sometimes we have to decide whether we really should do it at all.

We should all learn from Thomas Midgely, yes he discovered cars ran better with lead in the petrol and yes he found that adding cfcs to fridges was a good thing too. They all seemed like a good thing at the time, but were all paying for it now.

I'll stave off a few flames by pointing out the BBC article does indicate that it's made of carbon nanotubes and not paper as we know it, so the trees are safe for a bit longer, unless they decide to burn them down to make the carbon nanotubes !!!

They have produced a sample slightly larger than a postage stamp that can release about 2.3 volts, enough to illuminate a small light.

It ain't the volts (most torches run off 1.5v batteries, LEDs can run on a lot less) but the amps that count. Or, to put it another way, it's the product of the two, the wattage that truly matters, which is why 2100mA isn't really enough for a digital camera, hence the 2500mA variety (the voltage remains at 1.5).