Psystar's new method of income: T-shirts

The case of Psystar versus Apple has been a long and tedious one. The former's business was selling the software of the latter, on generic PC hardware; something that Apple doesn't take kindly to. Psystar was ordered to stop their business, but has now introduced a new product.

Though the company can't sell the very devices it was formed to sell, they have now introduced T-shirts, based on their recent loss in the courts. The quote on the Psystar's site states, "If you purchase the software, shouldn't you be able to do with it what you choose? If you are also of the opinion that Mac OS should not be tied to Apple hardware, continue to show your support of both Open Computing and Psystar by purchasing a t-shirt. Psystar is of the opinion that if you purchase a product, you should be free to do with it what you please. A retail copy of an OS should be no different. If you believe in Open Computing and you would like to show your support, buy a shirt."

This is a rather interesting method, but any method of money is better than none; the shirts'll cost you $15, and will help support the cause of "Open Computing," as Psystar puts it. An image of the T-shirt is included below, if any of you are considering picking one up.

Image courtesy of Gizmodo.

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It's still Apple's OS. You're just paying the license to use it. Psytar needs to move on. If their beloved OS isn't meant to be played nice on other hardware, that's too bad for them.

Meh, if Phystar were a non-profit company I might have more sympathy for them, but as they are not, I will not be buying a t-shirt from them.

The thing is, when you "buy" the mac os, you aren't actually buying the software, you're buying a permanent lease to use it. Apple still owns it, and therefore they make the decisions about its use.

Regardless of what happens now: If Apple computers ever become dominant, the US or EU will break Apple's "hardware monopoly" and force them to change their stupid policy.

Apple should rather create software's hardware required "standard". For example, you must have specific apple standard hardware (not necessarily apple branded) to run OSX. This way, smart people (and OEMs) will think of buying hardware that os two way compatible (OSX and WIN Logos certified or something). But reality says, Apple will get losses in their existing hardware business by adding more competitors in their existing hardware market

This remindes me of the scalping laws here in PA a few years ago, you couldn't sell tickets over face value... so people would say Free ticket with purchase of $500 pencil

(since they are giving away keycodes for their EFI solution with it)

OSx is a UNIX based operating system isn't designed to run on hardware other then what Apple use. If they wanna do that with their product then let them do so, and these noobs should just let the OSx86 community operate quietly in the background without all this fuss being drawn to it.

The problem is it does run on hardware other than Apple's choosing. In most cases the only reason it won't run simply because Apple blocked the hardware or changed the device ID just so the hardware doesn't work.

Psystar is of the opinion that if you purchase a product, you should be free to do with it what you please. A retail copy of an OS should be no different.
These guys need to get a clue, you don't own the OS your merely pay for a license to use it. It still remains property of the creator of the OS (Apple in this case) and they can do what they please with it (including telling you what hardware it can be installed on). Psystar really need to grow up in my humble opinion.

The problem lies in that Apple want to sell a "whole product" but like to make money from "updates". It can be easily become a non issue by them not selling OSX as a complete install, then no-one can even legally obtain it on its own.

haha, is that a loophole they can get away with? its like they buy the software and give it away for free right? Its not like you have to own a MAC to be able to buy the software.

But then again Apple will just find a way to band anyone to sell to Psystar

Except it isn't, you don't own the OS your merely paying for a license to use it (which stipulates it must be installed on an Apple branded PC). If you buy an item and it becomes your property then yes I agree you should be allowed to do anything you please with it but with computer software it just isn't that black and white.

Xerxes said,
Except it isn't, you don't own the OS your merely paying for a license to use it (which stipulates it must be installed on an Apple branded PC). If you buy an item and it becomes your property then yes I agree you should be allowed to do anything you please with it but with computer software it just isn't that black and white.

Exactly, that's the problem. That's what [these] people are ****ed off about

The argument is that no EULA has been legally held up in court before, and that once you have payed for the product you should be free to use it as you wish

Frank Fontaine said,
The argument is that no EULA has been legally held up in court before, and that once you have payed for the product you should be free to use it as you wish

However, you don't pay for a product, you pay for a license to use the product.

See it on the angle of rental appliances; you pay to use them, doesn't mean you can take that steam cleaner and modify it to your liking while in your possession.

Binary said,
However, you don't pay for a product, you pay for a license to use the product.

See it on the angle of rental appliances; you pay to use them, doesn't mean you can take that steam cleaner and modify it to your liking while in your possession.

You're not modifying it, you're using it in another room, that's all.

Frank Fontaine said,
The argument is that no EULA has been legally held up in court before, and that once you have payed for the product you should be free to use it as you wish

Except that is very much wrong. Yeah. EULAs have very much been found legally enforceable by innumerable cases. (There have also been innumerable cases striking down bad EULAs and individual clauses of EULAs -- but it is complete nonsense to claim that no EULA has held up in Court. Apple's just did, silly!) The innumerable precedents and a clear legal argument is what allowed Apple to win before ever going to trial.

Xerxes said,
Except it isn't, you don't own the OS your merely paying for a license to use it (which stipulates it must be installed on an Apple branded PC). If you buy an item and it becomes your property then yes I agree you should be allowed to do anything you please with it but with computer software it just isn't that black and white.

Why, because some stupid EULA says that I don't own it? Sorry but I paid for it and I will do what I choose to with it. Excuse me while I don't bother caring about the EULA. You can't tell me what to do just because you have $1 billion......