Quad-core Snapdragon to debut in devices later next year

Qualcomm has released a press statement announcing the quad-core Snapdragon. Their new chipset, named "AP8064", which is based on Qualcomm's Krait 28nm code, can pump out an unprecedented 2.5GHz for each core, and is specially designed for ultra-thin devices. It supports larger resolutions, HD gaming and even 3D capture and playback.

To put the announcement and speed into perspective, it's most likely at least 12x better performance should be expected over what's most likely in your smartphone now.

According to the press release, this 28nm micro-architecture will "redefine performance," achieving speeds of up to 2.5GHz per core and minimizing power consumption and heat generation to enable new, thin and light form factors. Which in turn is good news for users and manufacturers of ever thinner devices and sufferers of poor battery life due to the demand for more raw power.

"We're excited about the new, innovative devices the APQ8064 will enable in the market," said Luis Pineda, senior vice president of computing and consumer products at Qualcomm. "With its WiFi integration and ability to seamlessly interface with Qualcomm's 3G and LTE modules, the APQ8064 will provide OEM's with a flexible, cost efficient and fast time to market platform that can meet all of their design configuration needs for tablets and next generation computing and consumer electronic devices."

As part of the next generation Snapdragon family, the APQ8064 will share a core set of features, including a quad-combo of connectivity solutions (i.e. WLAN, GPS, BT and FM), support for NFC and stereoscopic 3D (S3D) video and photo capture and playback. The APQ8064 also will support all available major operating systems and be software compatible across the chipset family.

Read the full press release here.

Image credit: Gizmodo

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And the battery will last... how long?

Seriously, I hope these companies start to take battery life in to account when they think power, power, power with their devices. No use having a muscle phone if it won't even last you a day at work!

Zoom7000 said,
And the battery will last... how long?

Seriously, I hope these companies start to take battery life in to account when they think power, power, power with their devices. No use having a muscle phone if it won't even last you a day at work!

But then the companies who make 3rd party battery's that last longer than the original ones won't have jobs! Think about them!

Coming to Android and W7P phones near you. Haha... come on Jobs, please ditch the A4 and let others do your dirty work. FYI, Nvidia is also coming out with quad-core processor.

I wonder if the software for smartphones can even take advantage of the speed/cores though? I'm sure it would require an update, at least from Google and Android.

So tablets and smartphones are already getting to the point where you don't need to look at the specs any more, they are far more than you need for anything either way

Good luck making your phone last the day without charging it. As phones advance and add more and more stuff in there, the batteries are going to take a beating. I have to carry a spare one for my Hero sometimes just in case.

It's been mentioned in other posts and in this one that increased performance does not always equal decreased battery life. If you were to perform the same tasks on a dual core smartphone as the Hero then chances are it would actually use less power as it can draw less from both cores compared to single core devices e.g. your hero, which draws more power from one core. Sure, if you run way more intensive applications/games then battery life will suffer but fingers crossed that advances in mobile OS optimization and battery technology can keep runtime at an acceptable level.

I've actually used a Hero for a few months and in comparison my Nexus One has a much better battery life even though I'm using games and applications that I couldn't on the Hero. It could simply be a case of improved optimization in Gingerbread/Froyo or that the processor power consumption argument has some merit.

I use some glowing alien substance, found deep at the bottom of some trench in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. I get more than 9000 days standby and about 8999 of talk.

Soulsiphon said,
I use some glowing alien substance, found deep at the bottom of some trench in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. I get more than 9000 days standby and about 8999 of talk.

Yeah, well I get over 9000 days of talk time out of mine.

Is there even anything close to comparable? (serious question) I haven't exactly done any homework lately but I think this puts Intel and AMD on notice that they need to do something before Qualcomm comes up and steals their market right out from under them, minus a few sectors.

ramesees said,
But can it play Crysis ?

Does sound rather sweet though

It probably can, even on software render. Probably slow, too, but w/e! It's a smartphone.

Ohh man I can't wait for one of these babies in a handheld device.

ramesees said,
But can it play Crysis ?

Does sound rather sweet though

I wouldn't be surprised if it could have a shot at running Crysis 2 considering the Adreno GPU built into the SoC is now quad-core enabled too!

.Neo said,
Does that mean I can finally use my phone for advanced video editing?

No, it means your phone can multitask without being bogged down.

Amazing proc. I really think that (and incredible engineering) made the HD2 the best smartphone in the world (for a time). Can't wait for the next cut of it.