Qualcomm announces Snapdragon SDK for Android

Qualcomm will be releasing a software development kit for developers looking to support its Snapdragon processor line. Qualcomm has packed the SDK with a set of APIs for the Snapdragon S4 8960 processor and the company says it will be expanding the SDK’s support to more of the Snapdragon line over time.

The SDK includes tools that will help developers to add facial processing, surround sound, low-power geofencing, and more sensor gestures to their projects. A developer preview of the SDK is currently available until the final version is released sometime in the following months. 

It should be noted that Qualcomm already offers development hardware and HTML5 APIs, however by releasing an SDK, Qualcomm is allowing developers to embrace its hardware a lot easier with features that simply were not available previously. The development kit announcement suggests that it’s also Qualcomm’s answer to Nvidia's Tegra Zone SDK for Tegra-powered devices.

Source: Qualcomm (PRNewswire)

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15 Comments

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Please explain how this doesn't result in fragmentation. If you use this to optimize for snapdragon and use Tegra sdk to optmize for tegra. You have two versions of the same program for specific processors. How is that not fragmentation?

Melfster said,
Please explain how this doesn't result in fragmentation. If you use this to optimize for snapdragon and use Tegra sdk to optmize for tegra. You have two versions of the same program for specific processors. How is that not fragmentation?

Tegra optimized games work on all other chipsets as well. It just visual enhancements from Tegra. The same for Qualcomm.

The game developers don't write three different versions of the same game to work for Tegra Devices, Qualcomm Devices and everyone else. It is just one game with all the code in there. If you happen to have a Tegra device, your game will take advantage of that enhancement; or if you have a Qualcomm device, your game will take advantage of that enhancement.

I hope that clears things for you.

NightCrawlerInfinity said,

Tegra optimized games work on all other chipsets as well. It just visual enhancements from Tegra. The same for Qualcomm.

The game developers don't write three different versions of the same game to work for Tegra Devices, Qualcomm Devices and everyone else. It is just one game with all the code in there. If you happen to have a Tegra device, your game will take advantage of that enhancement; or if you have a Qualcomm device, your game will take advantage of that enhancement.

I hope that clears things for you.


In the iOS world when you go to market place you get games for 3GS, 4 & 4s because they all have approximately same graphics processor. In android world you will see game best optimized for tegra and/or qualcomm?

Melfster said,


In the iOS world when you go to market place you get games for 3GS, 4 & 4s because they all have approximately same graphics processor. In android world you will see game best optimized for tegra and/or qualcomm?

That is correct. It doesn't mean it won't run on a non-Tegra device. It is just optimized for that. Hence why they would write that in the first place. Qualcomm is trying to compete with Nvidia by making the SDK available.

trogenda said,
The kid should not be discouraged. He is a freshman in Neowin and journalism starts by plagiarizing legitimately.

Legitimately you say? Then site the Verge as well. I'm not trying to discourage him but if this was done in a university, he would have been thrown out.

rfirth said,

They are probably based off of the same Qualcomm press release.


No. It is based off the verge. The first two paragraphs of "his" article is exactly the same as the Verge article. The last paragraph is the same in both. Just click on the source of the press release to see for your self then click on the Verge article I posted. Same.

NightCrawlerInfinity said,

Legitimately you say? Then site the Verge as well. I'm not trying to discourage him but if this was done in a university, he would have been thrown out.


No. It is based off the verge. The first two paragraphs of "his" article is exactly the same as the Verge article. The last paragraph is the same in both. Just click on the source of the press release to see for your self then click on the Verge article I posted. Same.

Actually, the article is based off the press release. There is not a lot to cover other than what the Verge and other websites have covered. The press release is specific with what it offers to developers and I went with that, although its similar, there's only one direction it could have been written in, in my opinion.

But should I have intentionally plagiarized and changed around a few words, it would be regarded as paraphrasing which is legit and accepted in universities anyway - just saying.

Zeikku said,

Actually, the article is based off the press release. There is not a lot to cover other than what the Verge and other websites have covered. The press release is specific with what it offers to developers and I went with that, although its similar, there's only one direction it could have been written in, in my opinion.

But should I have intentionally plagiarized and changed around a few words, it would be regarded as paraphrasing which is legit and accepted in universities anyway - just saying.

Sorry, I showed a bunch of people at my workplace both articles and the press release. They said you weren't even trying. The press release is not even worded like the Verge article, yours is extremely similar to the Verge article.

Hey, maybe me and my coworkers are just crazy. So ignore this thread completely.

Melfster said,
Great if this is not fragmentation I don't know what is.

eh? I don't think you get what this is, you just wanted a chance to use your favourite buzzword.

It kinda makes sense - if you use this SDK poorly, you can end up limiting your application to only phones with the Snapdragon processor.

Since typical consumers (quite rightly) don't know what CPU their phone has, it can end up a confusing mess when application won't run on their device.