Questions and comments about Firefox 3, IE 8, the future of

Web browsers, cloud computing, and how it all comes together.

Paul Thurrott: So it's always amusing to me when the mainstream press tries to cover tech products, but I was particularly interested in this one since I'm in the middle of writing my own Firefox 3 review. I think that terms like "innovative" are thrown around too casually these days, and while I realize the competitive advantages inherent in using terms like that, let's be honest here: Firefox 3 is excellent, but it's not innovative at all, it's just an evolution of what browsers have always been. And that's fine, I guess. One thing this guy does get right, however, is that the browser is increasingly important because it's the gateway through which we do and will in the future experience cloud computing

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"Firefox 3 is excellent, but it's not innovative at all."
Well, personally, I think this is a very innovative version.
-The AwesomeBar, for me personally, really lives up to its name. It's no longer difficult to find a website you visited 2 months ago, you just type a few keywords in the AwesomeBar.
-The new bookmark manager (Places) integrates great with the above feature, through the tagging system, and allows me to ignore my usually quite bloated bookmarks menu :-)

"Just so I understand this quote, Mitchell Baker, the chairwoman of Mozilla, is claiming that one of the major new features in Firefox 3... will make the browser less easy to use if multiple people use it?"
No, it'll be as easy to use as Firefox 2 if you're on somebody elses computer, but easier if you're on your own computer.
Just like any other browser is easier on your computer because you have your bookmarks available.

Yes, those are 'only' two major features, but they've really improved my browsing experience, and I very much like Firefox 3.

I can't really comment on IE8 though, since I haven't tried it yet. I look forward to the increased standards support. The Web Slices feature sounds a bit weird, but quite useful. The activity feature, to be honest, doesn't sound all that special to me, but I hope it's useful to others.

(Mathiasdm said @ #5)
"Firefox 3 is excellent, but it's not innovative at all."
Well, personally, I think this is a very innovative version.
-The AwesomeBar, for me personally, really lives up to its name. It's no longer difficult to find a website you visited 2 months ago, you just type a few keywords in the AwesomeBar.
-The new bookmark manager (Places) integrates great with the above feature, through the tagging system, and allows me to ignore my usually quite bloated bookmarks menu :-)

"Just so I understand this quote, Mitchell Baker, the chairwoman of Mozilla, is claiming that one of the major new features in Firefox 3... will make the browser less easy to use if multiple people use it?"
No, it'll be as easy to use as Firefox 2 if you're on somebody elses computer, but easier if you're on your own computer.
Just like any other browser is easier on your computer because you have your bookmarks available.

Yes, those are 'only' two major features, but they've really improved my browsing experience, and I very much like Firefox 3.

I can't really comment on IE8 though, since I haven't tried it yet. I look forward to the increased standards support. The Web Slices feature sounds a bit weird, but quite useful. The activity feature, to be honest, doesn't sound all that special to me, but I hope it's useful to others.


+1

And with this article, any shred of respect I had for this complete moron is now lost. Let's look over the errors:


"Firefox were, of course, somewhat innovative, popularizing features that IE later copied, like tabbed browsing and pop-up blockers"
OOPS!! Mozilla did NOT invent tabbed browsing or pop-up blockers. HOW long have you been working on computers?


"these products (browsers) should do two things 1. Integrate more seamlessly with the underlying operating system"
WOAH! Microsoft WAS the first to innovate that way and they faced the largest anti-trust lawsuit EVER. I doubt they want to go down that road again but if you want to see a company that has (without the lawsuit because they seem to be above the law), try using a browser called Safari.


"Integrate more seamlessly with the Web services that are exposed by the application. Create hooks to Gmail, Google Calendar"
Open Internet Explorer. Tools > Options > Programs. Microsoft beat you to that one AGAIN.


"Microsoft, however, is in a unique position here because they...can...more seamlessly integrate all of this stuff together. Assuming they do it right. Which they haven't"
May I introduce you to Windows Live services?


"I've been very critical of Microsoft's decision to bundle IE into Windows."
Even though you just said that a browser should be integrated with an operating system. You're what Apple Stores call a "genius".


"But think about it. If you accept that the browser will become the portal to accessing the Web services of the future, doesn't it actually make sense from a marketing/usage/productisation standpoint to make the browser the core interface of both the OS (Windows) and the Web?"

Yes, genius, and Microsoft figured this out a long time ago. You are just getting it now. Microsoft called it "innovation". Look it up sometime. It's nice of you to admit you were wrong but give credit where it's due. Microsoft didn't do it by mistake, they did it because they knew what they were doing.

Hey whatever happened to your MVP status? Oh riiiiiiiiight. Can't even imagine why you would lose that.

OOPS!! Mozilla did NOT invent tabbed browsing or pop-up blockers. HOW long have you been working on computers?
Thats funny, Paul never said Mozilla invented those features. The quote you grabbed doesn't even have the word "invent" in it! I also did a quick search of the article, not once did Paul say Mozilla invented tab browsing or pop-up blockers. All he's saying is that Mozilla popularized these features and Microsoft added them later (realizing that Mozilla was beginning to eat away at Internet Explorer's market share).

WOAH! Microsoft WAS the first to innovate that way and they faced the largest anti-trust lawsuit EVER. I doubt they want to go down that road again but if you want to see a company that has (without the lawsuit because they seem to be above the law), try using a browser called Safari.
I believe Paul is referring to what you just compared it to, Safari. I don't believe Paul is suggesting to cause the same furious anger from the public as they did when IE4 was initially integrated into Windows 98.

Integrate more seamlessly with the Web services that are exposed by the application. Create hooks to Gmail, Google Calendar
Funny how Gmail and Google Calendar are not available to all users unless a Google App like Gmail Notifier is installed. I believe Paul would like to see IE integrate with the web service directly, as opposed to a to using a third party app (which isn't seamless).

Microsoft, however, is in a unique position here because they...can...more seamlessly integrate all of this stuff together. Assuming they do it right. Which they haven't
I don't think Windows Live services has taken the world by storm like Google has.

Anyone with an internet connection, and an inquiring mind will know "the main stream media" doesn't just cover up tech products Being that your ( US ) "main stream media" is basically owned by 5 big corporations (Google it! ), your question hardly requires an answer. Personally I can't wait for FF3, I use Intenet Explorer (6) when forced to by specific applications. But who will get there first? (FF3 or IE 8.06a SP2 rollup) :nuts:

it's simple :)

IE is first.
Firefox is 2nd.
Safari is 3rd.

in future Desktop/Laptop PC user won't use Opera. Opera will use only in Mobile. M i ryt? it you don't agree with me please explain.

FTFA: # (..)these products should do two things: Integrate more seamlessly with the underlying operating system in order to blur the line between the local operating environment and the Web services that are exposed by the application

God.. please not Active-X again!

Paul, the days of revolutionary IT are almost gone, all now is evolutionary rather than revolutionary.

(g0dlike said @ #1)
FTFA: # (..)these products should do two things: Integrate more seamlessly with the underlying operating system in order to blur the line between the local operating environment and the Web services that are exposed by the application

God.. please not Active-X again!

Paul, the days of revolutionary IT are almost gone, all now is evolutionary rather than revolutionary.

Funny thing is, Firefox, especially 3, can almost do it thanks to XUL or better still, it's vendor specific CSS tags that will allow HTML/XML elements to appear as native controls.

I also like how the title seems to hint that the Mozilla Organization for Firefox is an upstart, seeing as how Firefox is based on Mozilla who itself is based on Netscape's browser... now that's an old lineage there. It's older than IE I believe.