Report: BlackBerry to cut current workforce by 40 percent

BlackBerry may be publicly hyping up the launch of its newest smartphone, the Z30, today, but behind closed doors the company may be about to make some really hard decisions. That's the word coming from the Wall Street Journal today, which claims, via unnamed sources, that BlackBerry will be cutting down its workforce by as much as 40 percent very soon.

The report says the latest amount of mass layoffs will be handled in waves and will cut across all departments. In 2012, BlackBerry, under its old name Research in Motion, gave final notices to 5,000 employees. In July, 250 more jobs were cut at the company and several dozen other employees, mostly in sales, were laid off just last week. It is believed that BlackBerry has about 12,000 workers at the moment.

Officially, BlackBerry is keeping mum about any upcoming changes to its workforce, with a spokesperson saying only, "Organizational moves will continue to occur to ensure we have the right people in the right roles to drive new opportunities in mobile computing." A few weeks ago, the company confirmed that it is looking into "strategic alternatives," including selling all or part of its business. It's possible that BlackBerry believes that additional job cuts could make the company more attractive to prospective buyers.

Source: Wall Street Journal

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19 Comments

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good riddance. there are some very good reason for their fall in such a short time. do a search on rim's response to iphone's initial launch and you'll see why.

Everything that has a beginning has an end. Including Apple. I believe they have started a spiral downwards with their iOS 7 UI.

it's sad considering it was a 'canadian pride' for many years. i went to the university of waterloo (across the street from blackberry campus in waterloo, ontario) and had several classmates working there for internships, but the company really had it coming.

"Canadian Pride" is ultimately what did them in. That's the only explanation why they would have partnered with fellow Canadian company Qnix for their big OS transition.

Anyone who knew anything about Qnix could have told them that Qnix lost its top-tier multimedia OS coder years before this deal and was thus utterly incapable of doing what Blackberry needed done in the time frame that they needed to do it in. Those delays ended Blackberry last chance, period.

I feel bad for RIM. I've always been a fan of theirs until they started falling behind. I remember the days when the Treo's and BlacBerry's ruled the world.

My heart goes out to everyone at BlackBerry, everyone there is just so friendly, the support staff, the Dev support, everyone at developer relations etc... They're not your typical big company, they pay attention to each and every one of their developers individually, for example: you have a question, doesn't matter what it's about, just drop them an email and they'll help you out, no support fees or any of that nonsense...
Nobody deserves these kinds of layoffs, but the people at BB certainly don't deserve it imho!

The first person they should lay off is CEO who was so technologically ignorant. Oh I guess, they already did that. BB has good looking phone so it's hard to see them getting under water. Anyone noticed, whoever laughed at iPhone when it launched got fired such as from Ballmer to BB guys.

Auditor said,
The first person they should lay off is CEO who was so technologically ignorant. Oh I guess, they already did that. BB has good looking phone so it's hard to see them getting under water. Anyone noticed, whoever laughed at iPhone when it launched got fired such as from Ballmer to BB guys.

lol here is the pitch for the most brilliant man in the industry: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eywi0h_Y5_U

Kalint said,
lol here is the pitch for the most brilliant man in the industry: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eywi0h_Y5_U

It wasn't that far off the mark. The iPhone didn't sell amazingly well at the $500 subsidized price. It was only when they dropped the subsidized price with the 3G model that sales really took off. They also cut the subsidized price of the first generation iPhone around February 2008, which boosted sales.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F...ales_per_quarter_simple.svg

The part about the keyboard though, well... we know how that turned out.

Enron said,

It wasn't that far off the mark. The iPhone didn't sell amazingly well at the $500 subsidized price. It was only when they dropped the subsidized price with the 3G model that sales really took off. They also cut the subsidized price of the first generation iPhone around February 2008, which boosted sales.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F...ales_per_quarter_simple.svg

The part about the keyboard though, well... we know how that turned out.

But aren't most iPhones sold around the world non-subsidized?

That's still a $649 iPhone.

Michael Scrip said,

But aren't most iPhones sold around the world non-subsidized?

That's still a $649 iPhone.

I don't know about the rest of the world. They probably have a choice - buy the phone and save on your monthly, or do a contract. On AT&T, I pay the same monthly whether I buy the phone full price or get subsidized.

Enron said,

I don't know about the rest of the world. They probably have a choice - buy the phone and save on your monthly, or do a contract. On AT&T, I pay the same monthly whether I buy the phone full price or get subsidized.

I've always had the impression that subsidies and contracts are mostly a US thing.

In other countries I hear people buy a phone outright, then buy a SIM of their choice from any carrier.