Reports claim Windows XP can be updated via registry hack

Officially, Microsoft stopped releasing automatic public updates for Windows XP over a month ago after over 12 years. Now a registry hack has been found that, when placed in the OS, allows it to continue receiving updates.

The hack was first reported by BetaNews and later confirmed by ZDNet. By making a few changes in the registry of XP, the hack basically tricks the automatic update servers at Microsoft into thinking the OS is Windows Embedded POSReady 2009. The OS is based on Windows XP Service Pack 3 and it will continue to get security updates from Microsoft until April 2019.

The specific registry hack works with 32-bit systems but the owners of the few 64-bit Windows XP PCs can find a workaround on this forum. However, it's more than possible that this method will be short lived as Microsoft could make changes to block any securty updates that use this hack.

It should also be noted, as Microsoft has done many times, that Windows XP is well over 12 years old and PC owners should really upgrade to a more recent version of the OS that will not only keep getting security updates but will be more secure overall.

Source: BetaNews via ZDNet | Image via ZDNet

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But how can it be when Microsoft is not really making any updates? I mean there are no updates on the server so how it will update itself?

I love the hate people have for those who are stuck with XP. Old grandmas who know absolutely nothing about technology, just shell out for a new computer already. But some people seriously don't have a choice, old grandmas included.

At my work, we've done our damned best to upgrade all computers to at least Windows 7 even on antiquated computers, however there are computers integrated into equipment and instruments that cannot be easily upgraded. Software and DAQ cards built for the equipment were programmed for XP environment and hardware associated with older systems. Explain to me the ease to upgrade a half a million dollar piece of equipment in order to run Windows 7. No problem, just buy a new version of that equipment right?

I hate XP, it's a old. All my personal computers and non-equipment related work computers are Windows 7 and up, but I totally understand how certain industries and infrastructure components are still on XP. The upgrade simply isn't as easy as going to Best Buy and buying a new PC.

splur said,
I love the hate people have for those who are stuck with XP. Old grandmas who know absolutely nothing about technology, just shell out for a new computer already. But some people seriously don't have a choice, old grandmas included.

At my work, we've done our damned best to upgrade all computers to at least Windows 7 even on antiquated computers, however there are computers integrated into equipment and instruments that cannot be easily upgraded. Software and DAQ cards built for the equipment were programmed for XP environment and hardware associated with older systems. Explain to me the ease to upgrade a half a million dollar piece of equipment in order to run Windows 7. No problem, just buy a new version of that equipment right?

I hate XP, it's a old. All my personal computers and non-equipment related work computers are Windows 7 and up, but I totally understand how certain industries and infrastructure components are still on XP. The upgrade simply isn't as easy as going to Best Buy and buying a new PC.

even xp as old, is way better than 8.

ugh.

As soon as the news was out that POS Ready 2009 was XP but crippled, i knew this was bound to happen. Of course there is alot of people and organizations that still use XP, i know a few of them. Do they want to use XP? No, but they can't afford right now to replace those computers and using Linux is a no no (because of apps). Right now there is a lot of companies that are using VDI so they tight up their XP workstations and use them just as a laucher for the VDI apps / remote desktop.

Using XP (or other ancient OS for the matter) is like driving an old car: does it run? yes, but the fuel consumption is huge, safety measures are old and non standard, doens't have or run the latest technologies and many times the repair costs are huge and difficult to maintain. But yeah, it does run...

The OS is based on Windows XP Service Pack 3 and it will continue to get security updates from Microsoft until April 2019. so the Hack thing will work great and the shouldn't be any problem for windows xp.

Perhaps the death of XP would have been a good time to hold another cut price sale on licenses for 8.1 like they did for 8 when it was released.

Javik said,
Perhaps the death of XP would have been a good time to hold another cut price sale on licenses for 8.1 like they did for 8 when it was released.

QFT. I mean I think they really had their heads up their ass.

To be fair a lot of XP machines probably would not have worked great with windows 8 and the fact 8.1 did remove support for some things.

BUT for the machines that could, have a deal where an upgrade to Windows 8 is only $45.

warwagon said,

QFT. I mean I think they really had their heads up their ass.

To be fair a lot of XP machines probably would not have worked great with windows 8 and the fact 8.1 did remove support for some things.

BUT for the machines that could, have a deal where an upgrade to Windows 8 is only $45.

Except many do not want the new cell phone interface. It is a reason to keep XP. Also, the people who still run it are not technical literate or are but stuborn to change and or dirt cheap. They won't upgrade unless it is free and even then most won't because what they have works even if it means waiting 5 minutes for it start.

It is all they know. Those who are dirt cheap likely have 512 Rambus ram systems as well and maybe 1 gig ddr1 if you are lucky which costs many times more than newer ram to encourage people to upgrade. No sense upgrading something from 10 years ago.

I know where you're coming from, I hate the interface as well, but start is back makes it far more bearable. And although a lot of true legacy stuff will indeed not run 8.1, any Pentium 4 made after 2005 should, all of the Socket 775 processors had NX.

Javik said,
I know where you're coming from, I hate the interface as well, but start is back makes it far more bearable. And although a lot of true legacy stuff will indeed not run 8.1, any Pentium 4 made after 2005 should, all of the Socket 775 processors had NX.

Did you read the part with 512 megs of ram? Intel 8xxx integrated graphics and even a matrox card won't have drivers and a single ad of flash will bring it down to it's knees assuming you upgrade it to 2 gigs of ram. The hard disk is 80 gigs where sxs in the Windows folder takes 60 gigs of! Then after all the effort the users is pulling his or her hair out because it looks funny and things like bookmarks in the blue are gone because if it's not in a menu then it doesn't exist?!

Just throw it out.

MSFT should do XP users a favor and allow free licenses of Windows 8.1 with Bing. Giving it to big OEM "hardware partners" to compete with Chromebooks isn't going to increase 8.1 usage much. Giving it to current XP users will increase usage substantially. Sure, some machines will be dog slow. At least they'll be up to date.

I'm starting to wonder if they might end up releasing a cut back SKU with basic functionality free to all users, if they reached a point where they were making enough money from apps to offset the cost I don't think it would be a bad move. For 95% of the public the basic SKU's are still good enough for the job.

Nice find for this, but seriously: if you're anyone that knows anything about XP or Windows or computing at all, recommending it or making use of it instead of telling/recommending people to move on from XP is a mistake, it really is.

While it's a nice find, and some folks will certainly make use of it (probably for years to come, sadly), XP really needs to be removed from as many machines as possible and that's as simple as it truly gets.

If anyone is curious, I have tried this reg hack on a VM install of XP and it does indeed work. The security update for IE8 (KB2953522) showed up among the 4 that became available.

Windows POS is actually XP embedded, that does mean half the things in XP aren't included, and means if there's an exploit found in one of those systems, it will remain unpatched and be freely exploitable.

Lord Method Man said,
Good news for the third world I guess. Irrelevant to anyone living in a modern society.

There's so much idiocy in this post, and and the same time it's so interesting sociologically speaking that I'm left speechless.

xdot.tk said,
Umm. It was first reported by Softpedia then gHacks picked it up. I've been getting abused in the forums over POSReady updates going back to August 2012.
Softpedia: http://www.neowin.net/forum/to...ka-xp/page-5#entry596417551
gHacks: http://www.neowin.net/forum/to...ka-xp/page-5#entry596417653

http://www.neowin.net/forum/to...-2009-supported-until-2019/
http://www.neowin.net/forum/to...rding-posready-2009-aka-xp/

You weren't abused. You were trolling and were called out on it.

You brought attention to a thread that was dead for nearly two years just to post how you were still using this and did it in an obvious trolling manner.

non to mention he was using the OS in a violation of the EULA; for consumers that can pass but in a business? that is a reason for someone get himself fired.

Microsoft's method of ending Windows XP has been very, very flawed.

They could've easily released patches and updates that slowly disabled parts of it, educated users better and delivered a safe and stable product for the small percentage of users who cant upgrade for whatever reason.

Microsoft's false justification in ending XP's life is evident in the fact that this hack works and the OS it's based on will be good till 2019.

I also hope businesses and others that have paid for XP's extended support dont find out about this little trick. Not the trick to hack the registry, but the trick that MS played on them saying XP is done.

warwagon said,
My question is why did they wait til the month before to release that support will end popup? Why not 6 months before.

Seriously? It's been posted all over the place a looong time before that. They even extended it because it came as some sort of surprise somehow.

AmazingRando said,
They could've easily released patches and updates that slowly disabled parts of it

I agree XP is outdated and I haven't used it in years, but the day they start disabling any software that I paid for is the day I switch to another company and tell Microsoft to go take a flying leap.

Bonfire said,
While I agree XP is outdated and I haven't used it for years, the day Microsoft starts disabling software that I paid for is the day I tell them to DIAF and switch to another company.

That's never happened. (Also probably illegal as all hell unless you're paying for a license that's on a fixed duration/subscription.) You can still download updates for Windows 2000 for example, and it still works. Just don't expect more updates for dead software.

Yeah the ending was very flawed. People are still using XP on home machines.

And limited support on a tiny broken down version of XP that's used on a specific number of systems only, versus supporting a full fledged OS on a billion different hardware configurations... I suppose you can do the maths.

XP is not good to be used till 2019. It shouldn't even be in use (on any internet connection, what people do offline is their business, but their ticket to join the drone army affects my business) today. Please kill this with fire anywhere you can, Microsoft should've pushed harder and started many years ago to get people to move their asses from XP.

I like looking back on XP and it has served me very well after a terrible start (its release was received worse than Windows 8 and Vista's). But now it needs to go.

Bonfire said,

I agree XP is outdated and I haven't used it in years, but the day they start disabling any software that I paid for is the day I switch to another company and tell Microsoft to go take a flying leap.

Why would they disable software? They have no control over other people's code. Just don't expect everything to run on XP.

Dot Matrix said,

Why would they disable software? They have no control over other people's code. Just don't expect everything to run on XP.

I meant their own software like XP, and I know they wouldn't do that (it would be a PR nightmare and I'm not sure if they would even be allowed to). I was replying to AmazingRando's comment that Microsoft should have started disabling XP features to get people to upgrade.

Of course XP is good until 2019. You seem to think that using XP is, in itself, somehow unsafe. On my main computer I have a clean install of XP. The only updates I have ever added post-installation were those for IE8, and the patch against the "conflicker worm".
I have good firewall, antivirus and malware protection. My current setup been running since 2008, and I have never been infected or compromised by any outside virus or malware. I have a backup on an external drive, but have only used it on those rare times when I've infected myself on purpose just to see what damage a virus or malware can do, so I could work on someone else's infected machine. The outcry about XP being unsafe is way overblown. Not sure what else to say. Never going to change the minds of those who support Microsoft pushing out new operating systems every couple of years. Don't know what their agenda is, and don't really care. Just wish they would leave us XP users in peace, and move on.

Max Norris said,

Seriously? It's been posted all over the place a looong time before that. They even extended it because it came as some sort of surprise somehow.

We all knew about it but the average Joe didn't. I had quite a few people annoyed. Because by the time it started appearing on the screen, that was the first they had heard of it. They wished Microsoft would have given them more warning.

warwagon said,
We all knew about it but the average Joe didn't.

Not sure who Joe is but I've personally haven't run into anyone who didn't know this was coming, and I deal with a good number of people day to day. These aren't tech people, these are attorneys, accountants, random people next door, etc etc. It was even on major news outlets, including on TV. You'd have to go out of your way not to hear about it.

Why not popup an actual notice on the computer screen. This way the average user wouldn't have had to get the news second hand. "Microsoft, would have told them 6 months before"

Edited by warwagon, May 26 2014, 9:37pm :

Bonfire said,

I agree XP is outdated and I haven't used it in years, but the day they start disabling any software that I paid for is the day I switch to another company and tell Microsoft to go take a flying leap.

I meant this as a totally voluntary concept as I have described numerous other times. Microsoft could've released "patches" that disabled parts of the OS and its code to limit the exposure down. There could have been a "Grandma" version that disables IIS, closes all but web ports, etc. Then a step up that's less restrictive and then a third one that's even less restrictive. All optional.

They should've started blasting info about this to XP users directly via updates and spent more time educating end-users on what is happening and why. I know, to us, it seems like XP ending is like beating a dead horse with another dead horse, but to your average mouth breather, they dont have a clue what XP even really is, what it does or anything.

MS spent more time promoting the sale of the XBOX 1, etc. And rightly so as that's a product and they are a business. But for a company to host several websites about being safe online, owning their own antivirus product and extolling "safer computing practices" they sure let the least among us twist in the wind on this one.

AmazingRando said,

I meant this as a totally voluntary concept as I have described numerous other times. Microsoft could've released "patches" that disabled parts of the OS and its code to limit the exposure down. There could have been a "Grandma" version that disables IIS, closes all but web ports, etc. Then a step up that's less restrictive and then a third one that's even less restrictive. All optional.

Oh I see what you mean. Sorry, I misunderstood. You can already disable all that stuff and lock it down I believe even though I don't think your average grandma would know how to do it and I doubt the people who are still using it would want to.

I still have a Windows 98 machine for playing old games and for old hardware like my video capture card that isn't supported on Windows 7/8. It is not connected to the internet but for the stuff I use it for it works as well as it did when it was new. I can understand people still wanting to use XP machines for some things but as a main computer for the internet and stuff, it is really long past time to upgrade. :)

warwagon said,
Why not popup an actual notice on the computer screen. This way the average user wouldn't have had to get the news second hand. "Microsoft, would have told them 6 months before"

They did but only if the user got the harassment update through Windows Updates. The better solution would have been a way to display something to the user's screen without the user installing something but Microsoft would catch heat for a backdoor *cough*.

Rock and a hard place situation. Microsoft could have declared that end of support was coming years ago (they actually did...) and you would still have people saying "Hell I wasn't told!". I don't fault them on this point.

Zidane said,

They did but only if the user got the harassment update through Windows Updates. The better solution would have been a way to display something to the user's screen without the user installing something but Microsoft would catch heat for a backdoor *cough*.

Rock and a hard place situation. Microsoft could have declared that end of support was coming years ago (they actually did...) and you would still have people saying "Hell I wasn't told!". I don't fault them on this point.

Yes their website:

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us...erprise/end-of-support.aspx

Opened 2 years ago was very effective. /s

I never saw anything even on their main site or even MSN.com

Most of the less tech-savvy people would've gotten good information from seeing it on MSN.com.

AmazingRando said,

Yes their website:

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us...erprise/end-of-support.aspx

Opened 2 years ago was very effective. /s

I never saw anything even on their main site or even MSN.com

Most of the less tech-savvy people would've gotten good information from seeing it on MSN.com.

Except that Microsoft doesn't influence the content of msn.com. They have their ads there for Outlook and Bing but they don't control the content msn shows.

You further prove my point. No matter how little or how much Microsoft "campaigned" the end of XP...people would STILL be bitching that they "weren't told".

Besides, you and everyone else arguing that "many weren't told" are greatly exaggerating how many people didn't know vs. didn't care. I've not found a single residential consumer at my place of business in the past year who didn't know XP was going out of support cause of the radio, TV, and/or Internet. Instead, we have had many who frankly didn't care.

I'm in a unique situation as I "write and support the code"...meaning I make software professionally and do IT support. I can understand frustrations others like warwagon have had with this whole scenario just as much as Microsoft's frustration with supporting a product past the initial support deadline without any compensation (ignoring enterprise support contracts here).

Zidane said,

Except that Microsoft doesn't influence the content of msn.com. They have their ads there for Outlook and Bing but they don't control the content msn shows.

I think you're confusing msn.com with MSNBC. Microsoft wholly owns and operates MSN.com and I can recall several times where I've seen a bar at the top to remind me to try out their new version of IE, etc.

I'm also not talking about making sure every last person in the world knows and if they dont it's Microsoft's fault. What I AM talking about is that they spammed more crap about Skydrive's name change directly to me via ads, emails and web page alerts than I ever naturally saw for Windows XP.

They could've done a lot more. Heck the http://www.amirunningxp.com/ site didnt show up until about 20 days before cut-off.

AmazingRando said,

I think you're confusing msn.com with MSNBC. Microsoft wholly owns and operates MSN.com and I can recall several times where I've seen a bar at the top to remind me to try out their new version of IE, etc.

I'm also not talking about making sure every last person in the world knows and if they dont it's Microsoft's fault. What I AM talking about is that they spammed more crap about Skydrive's name change directly to me via ads, emails and web page alerts than I ever naturally saw for Windows XP.

They could've done a lot more. Heck the http://www.amirunningxp.com/ site didnt show up until about 20 days before cut-off.

I think you aren't reading what I said or are skimming over the parts you don't like. I said that Microsoft does show ads for their services (like Outlook and Bing) but they don't influence the CONTENT of the site.

Perhaps I should define the content which is their articles and such. Meaning it is up to the editors at msn to put up an XP end of support article, not what Microsoft wants.

...anyhow we can do this song and dance all day long but the truth of the matter is Microsoft DID put out advance notice and, by far and large, it was to an acceptable level in my opinion. If you think otherwise, I guess we will agree to disagree.

Zidane said,

in my opinion. If you think otherwise, I guess we will agree to disagree.

Right. Your opinion. My opinion. Where you say you havent talked to a single person, I've dealt with dozens and dozens of people who were confused by what was going on and the stuff that they were hearing or people who flat out had no idea or why it was even important.

In my opinion, I've seen Microsoft put forth more effort in their Scroogled ad campaign than they did in pro-active outreach for the end of XP. If someone heard about it on TV or the radio, it wasnt from Microsoft going out there and talking about it or buying commercial time.

They could've utilized this time to educate people and make sales. They missed their chance.

AmazingRando said,

Right. Your opinion. My opinion. Where you say you havent talked to a single person, I've dealt with dozens and dozens of people who were confused by what was going on and the stuff that they were hearing or people who flat out had no idea or why it was even important.

In my opinion, I've seen Microsoft put forth more effort in their Scroogled ad campaign than they did in pro-active outreach for the end of XP. If someone heard about it on TV or the radio, it wasnt from Microsoft going out there and talking about it or buying commercial time.

They could've utilized this time to educate people and make sales. They missed their chance.

Microsoft has never made a hoopla about EoL before, why would they start here?

Good Lord why don't you just give it up. move on. so companies can make new software and pay someone to make it for a new OS. Give it up and move on.

Windows 95 was also massively popular, but people weren't still clinging on to it in 2008.

It's time to dump XP.

But those guys are tools.
Sticking to Win95 because of "native" explorer buttons or better yet "I prefer to play my DOS games on the real DOS instead of emulated"....
Some obvious faulty wiring in their attics.

Enron said,
Windows 95 was also massively popular, but people weren't still clinging on to it in 2008.

It's time to dump XP.


Windows 3.11 was still being sold until a few years ago ;)

Enron said,
Windows 95 was also massively popular, but people weren't still clinging on to it in 2008.

It's time to dump XP.

You know? It is really weird how XP is still with us? Why? What is so special and sacred about that one release of Windows?

Yada yada I know there are a number of reasons why it lasted longer than say Windows 98 but #### it is turning 13 this August!

People love it soo much. It is the best OS ever and the all that holy and XP is cannon for some odd reason it seems.

My only theory is enthusiasts owned more of the market in the 1990's when 95/98 were around and now neophytes got their first computers last decade and feel computers are a 20 year investment and do not understand obsolete technology.

Also people after 35 hate change and do not want to use brain muscle to memorize things and no longer get excited about new things. It is a fact people after 40 are more set in their ways and former enthusiasts who laughed if you still ran 98 by 2004, are now the people they make fun of with "YOU CAN PRY XP OFF MY COLD DEAD HANDS".

I am shaking my head at this. What I really fear and wonder is what will happen 4 -5 years down the road when Windows 7 will be getting near EOL? I tell you it wont be pretty. These users who think w7 is shiny new today will say "What I just upgraded HOW DARE MS FORCE ME TO CHANGE" or something totally stupid. We will see what happens but Windows 7 will stick much longer if MS keeps Modern around. It is the reason why XP is still around too.

sinetheo said,

What I really fear and wonder is what will happen 4 -5 years down the road when Windows 7 will be getting near EOL? I tell you it wont be pretty. These users who think w7 is shiny new today will say "What I just upgraded HOW DARE MS FORCE ME TO CHANGE" or something totally stupid. We will see what happens but Windows 7 will stick much longer if MS keeps Modern around. It is the reason why XP is still around too.

What does Modern have to do with anything? Why is modern the cause of XP still being around when there's Windows 7? Modern isn't going anywhere, and is currently being developed for Win9 (at least to rumors).

I knew this would happen. Especially after I learned that XP embedded would continue to get updated through 2019. I ran the p.o.s. version in a virtual machine for quite a long time a few years back, and it's exactly the same thing as XP, only a severely crippled version. With a few tweaks here and there, it can become a full fledged XP system. I never mess with the registry unless I absolutely have to, but I know it's extremely powerful. I did in my vm, but that was a long time ago, in a galaxy far far away. ;)

Since XP support ended, updates have been ported over from POSReady 2009 and are circulating on the net. Now this news of a simple registry change to allow updates through MS to continue. Reports of the death of XP have been premature, even in the face of the official word from Microsoft. We don't all need to have the latest software to carry out our daily tasks. XP will be good until at least 2019, and maybe beyond that. I think choice is a good thing.

Local network shouldn't be much issue. Any decent network does not rely on the end-machines for security in the network.

It's the homeuser XP connecting it directly (be it an ISP modem) to the internet.

Shadowzz said,
.... It's the homeuser XP connecting it directly (be it an ISP modem) to the internet.

Yes. My company charges extra for the router integrated into the modem. I can see how this could be a big problem.

Although I wouldn't normally post on a thread like this because I usually get savaged, come on guys and store owners, time to upgrade.... (assuming there is an enterprise and pos ready 8+)

Real professional, encouraging folks stay on a fundamentally insecure OS, I will probably inform Microsoft myself to close this loophole.
XP's core does not feature advanced protections and mitigations that protect Vista, 7 and 8.1 Update and it is just unsafe today
XP is 13 years old-- it is dead in terms of technology and built in protections
Move the heck on, Windows 8.1 Update is excellent, or move to some other OS, whatever it takes besides XP

"It should also be noted, as Microsoft has done many times, that Windows XP is well over 12 years old and PC owners should really upgrade to a more recent version of the OS that will not only keep getting security updates but will be more secure overall."

and sure, cover your own arse all you like but you still aren't doing anyone favors posting on this Hack, be responsible

I'll tell that to the 75 year old widow that has some old POS Dell PC with XP on it. She can't even afford internet and uses the neighbors. It's painful to even work on but there are millions in this position. She only uses it to check her mail and stay in touch with family and is at ZERO risk of losing anything so your argument is meaningless to people like her.

Listen if some 75 year old or whatever age for that matter can't manage to scrape up $300 in 13 years for a new PC running a supported OS that's their problem to sort out

Yep, and shouting down selfish narrow minded views like yours is mine. I hope you get to experience struggle like hers at some point in your life. Why do I get the feeling you're wearing hipster pants.

Hahaiah said,
I'll tell that to the 75 year old widow that has some old POS Dell PC with XP on it.

Then tell grandma to at least switch over to a free Linux distro if that's all she's doing. At least the vulnerabilities in the OS and browser will still get patched.. better alternative to killing her neighbors wifi because her machine got turned into a drone in a botnet due to a browser exploit... also note that browsers that currently run under XP still won't forever. A good number of major sites no longer support IE8, Chrome drops support next year, Firefox will probably follow suit, etc. Not a good place to be.

Or plunk down a few bucks on a cheap tablet.

Why? Why are you so obsessed with the issue of forcing people to upgrade that don't want to? It's not a hack, POS Ready 2009 is exactly the same as XP pro, it just has a different visual theme and a few superfluous components stripped out. There's no risk to installing these patches on an XP system because it's exactly the same code.

Because XP is fundamentally insecure at its core, It has almost no Protections modern browsers and a modern OS has. this leaves any information on your system up for grabs and god forbid you're doing banking or anything of real importance. No patches are going to add the basic protections we enjoy today in a Modern OS, what part of this don't you grasp?

Javik said,
Why? Why are you so obsessed with the issue of forcing people to upgrade that don't want to? It's not a hack, POS Ready 2009 is exactly the same as XP pro, it just has a different visual theme and a few superfluous components stripped out. There's no risk to installing these patches on an XP system because it's exactly the same code.

Maybe because we'll be on the receiving end of the upcoming XP drone army.

Javik said,
Why? Why are you so obsessed with the issue of forcing people to upgrade that don't want to? It's not a hack, POS Ready 2009 is exactly the same as XP pro, it just has a different visual theme and a few superfluous components stripped out. There's no risk to installing these patches on an XP system because it's exactly the same code.

It is and isn't the same code. These updates are not tested on XP before being released. They're not designed with consumer applications and interests in mind.

Dot Matrix said,
It is and isn't the same code. These updates are not tested on XP before being released. They're not designed with consumer applications and interests in mind.

It's just like saying Server 2003 and XP are the same.. it is.. sorta. But it's also not. There could be future patches to the POS version that breaks something in the desktop version (OS or applications), some patches that would apply to the desktop stuff may not even make it to POS at all since it wouldn't apply, etc etc, and that's working on the assumption that nobody at Microsoft actually reads anything on the Internet and doesn't decide to close this little loophole. It's an awful gamble just to cling to something that's this old, never mind third party support is starting to disappear as well. Buy a copy of 7 or 8, or if you're on a cripplingly tight fixed income, snag a free Linux ISO. No other OS has been supported anywhere near this long, how long is long enough?

dingl_ said,
Because XP is fundamentally insecure at its core, It has almost no Protections modern browsers and a modern OS has. this leaves any information on your system up for grabs and god forbid you're doing banking or anything of real importance. No patches are going to add the basic protections we enjoy today in a Modern OS, what part of this don't you grasp?

Its their life not yours. what part of this don't you grasp?

dingl_ said,
I like to keep people Informed and protected, If you don't care, that's on you

I give them the information, what they choose to do with it is up to them. You sound ike someone who wants to walk in their house grab their XP machine, and throw it on the drive way and annihilate it with a baseball bat.

dingl_ said,
Because XP is fundamentally insecure at its core, It has almost no Protections modern browsers and a modern OS has. this leaves any information on your system up for grabs and god forbid you're doing banking or anything of real importance. No patches are going to add the basic protections we enjoy today in a Modern OS, what part of this don't you grasp?

The part where you think that what other people do with their computers is any of your business. That, and people using this hack will actually have more secure systems than those with no hotfixes, which kinda negates your whole argument anyway.

dingl_ said,
I like to keep people Informed and protected, If you don't care, that's on you

There's a big distinction between informing people and trying to browbeat your personal preferences into them, and it's obviously one you don't get.

So tell me, what sages of wisdom do you give to a person who has a PC that has a CPU without NX, or a dated GPU with no Windows 7 drivers, and that can't afford a new PC?

Javik said,
So tell me, what sages of wisdom do you give to a person who has a PC that has a CPU without NX, or a dated GPU with no Windows 7 drivers, and that can't afford a new PC?

Throw on Linux. At least their OS and browsers will still get updated and won't cost them a penny. (Keep in mind it's not just the OS, IE8's already dead and Chrome is ticking down, Firefox probably won't be long after.) Conversely, save up a few bucks to get a cheap GPU that does work on Vista+. Not like they're terribly expensive.

Edited by Max Norris, May 26 2014, 4:39pm :

dingl_ said,
I will probably inform Microsoft myself to close this loophole.

I'm sure their extremely qualified, experienced engineers can't wait to hear what some random person on the internet has to tell them about their own product.

Max Norris said,

Throw on Linux. At least their OS and browsers will still get updated and won't cost them a penny. (Keep in mind it's not just the OS, IE8's already dead and Chrome is ticking down, Firefox probably won't be long after.) Conversely, save up a few bucks to get a cheap GPU that does work on Vista+. Not like they're terribly expensive.

You'd be surprised by how many XP era workstations there out there that have neither a PCI-E nor an AGP graphics slot. Dell Optiplex workstations are particularly bad for that.

I'm inclined to agree that people should be switched to Linux rather than browbeating them into buying hardware they really don't need though.

Javik said,
You'd be surprised by how many XP era workstations there out there that have neither a PCI-E nor an AGP graphics slot.

Shoot something that old yea.. well it'll still work via the generic VGA driver with.. 'acceptable' performance if you have low expectations, got a couple first gen ProLiant servers like that.. it works. Not like you're going to game on it anyways. But yea, as for the rest.. Linux or upgrade.. *anything* is better than relying on a dodgy workaround that may disappear soon anyway, never mind won't do anything for third party stuff that's dropping it.

Ambroos said,

I'm sure their extremely qualified, experienced engineers can't wait to hear what some random person on the internet has to tell them about their own product.

Yeah, because that's never happened before... oh wait.

warwagon said,

I give them the information, what they choose to do with it is up to them. You sound ike someone who wants to walk in their house grab their XP machine, and throw it on the drive way and annihilate it with a baseball bat.

I got some old Dell dimensions p4s with leaky capacitors that I would be happy to leave by the train tracks. As a plus I can plug in the monitors showing the XP green hills while I record them being disintegrated in slo mo for Dot Matrix's delight. I bet it would make #1 in forums for months here!

Zdnets forums might be filled with die hard crying but that is another story

Max Norris said,

Shoot something that old yea.. well it'll still work via the generic VGA driver with.. 'acceptable' performance if you have low expectations, got a couple first gen ProLiant servers like that.. it works. Not like you're going to game on it anyways. But yea, as for the rest.. Linux or upgrade.. *anything* is better than relying on a dodgy workaround that may disappear soon anyway, never mind won't do anything for third party stuff that's dropping it.

It's not just about gaming, a lot of web browser functionality also requires D2D and D3D acceleration as well, and performance on the generic VGA driver for those tasks is positively awful.

Totally agree. The web is a painful place with annoying flash ads, videos are now HD 360p or 720p by default and smooth scrolling in firefox and IE would make something 2d only very painful.

More people use netflix now anyway and even with a great video card from 2004 would have problems even with 360p due to the lack of video ram for the buffer.

Most of the statistics are in China and Vietnam which are heavily outweighed based on population (not freaking computers!) that multiple these dinosaurs over in statistics which show IE 8 most popular browser and 1 out of 4 still using XP.

Still my parents still used it and many old and poor people do. I was a good son and put 7 on there system, but many are not fortunate and do not have a nice of computer. This machine was a low end core2 remarked Pentium D with intel 945 for $1700 in 2007. It is sluggish still with flash and javascripts. What about one from 2004? Could that even handle chrome or Firefox on Windows 7? It wont. It will have probably 512 - 1 gig of ram, AGP graphics or embedded intel junk.

Windows 7 MIGHT boot. But dang you do not want to run it without major ram upgrades worth more than the computer. Rambus ram is not cheap for ancient legacy junk.

dingl_ said,
Because XP is fundamentally insecure at its core, It has almost no Protections modern browsers and a modern OS has. this leaves any information on your system up for grabs and god forbid you're doing banking or anything of real importance. No patches are going to add the basic protections we enjoy today in a Modern OS, what part of this don't you grasp?

That part that implies that IS NOT YOUR FRIGGING COMPUTER!

dingl_ said,
Listen if some 75 year old or whatever age for that matter can't manage to scrape up $300 in 13 years for a new PC running a supported OS that's their problem to sort out

well... some people need all the money they have just to pay the bills and then some. Especially these days. Your comment is very shortsighted.

If somebody can't scrape together that amount of money in 13 years, they got bigger things to worry about than getting online or using a computer period

That my friend is reality in this new economy. Food prices have doubled in 5 years! Health insurance has doubled. CEO pay has doubled. Your workload has doubled and you are asked to sacrifice and do more with less.

Some folks haven't got a raises in freaking years! Why? HR gets a stack of applications in the hundreds each month. What is the incentive than give the cash to the CEO instead?

So what is this about throwing out a perfectly good computer again?

dingl_ said,
If somebody can't scrape together that amount of money in 13 years, they got bigger things to worry about than getting online or using a computer period

So these people aren't allowed to be online?
Dude, you have NO idea how good your life is. There are TONS of people who CANNOT save a dime. It all goes to keeping the family alive and well. There are also a lot of people having more than one job, just to be able to pay all the bills.

Just stick your head out of the window, and see how some people are barely getting by.
And No..... Sometimes it's out of their hands.

Why don't just upgrade to Windows 7 or Windows 8.x?
I mean, I replace my TV set and other peripherals (also) after 12 years of service....

Because it's really expensive for a big organisation to switch.
I can't understand you guys always say the same thing without even thinking twice about it.

kiddingguy said,
Why don't just upgrade to Windows 7 or Windows 8.x?
I mean, I replace my TV set and other peripherals (also) after 12 years of service....

You know, not all the world have money to buy a new computer.

Aokromes said,

You know, not all the world have money to buy a new computer.

I'm not saying they should buy a new computer.

Windows 8.1 Pro Full retail costs $184. Over 12 months (life cycle) this means $1.28/month.

However, given the original upgrade price of $39 to Win 8, this will even be as low as $0.27/month.
Even the 27 cents are affordable in low income countries/households I'd say.

kiddingguy said,

I'm not saying they should buy a new computer.

Windows 8.1 Pro Full retail costs $184. Over 12 months (life cycle) this means $1.28/month.

However, given the original upgrade price of $39 to Win 8, this will even be as low as $0.27/month.
Even the 27 cents are affordable in low income countries/households I'd say.

Soo, you sugest to install Windows 8 on a system with 128 to 512 MB of ram?

I know a few companies that buy hardware via the bargain bin. A nice office set of 20 PCs (i3 based systems) a total of 300 dollars preloaded with genuine Windows 7. Folks gotta look in the right places ;)

boumboqc said,
Because it's really expensive for a big organisation to switch.
I can't understand you guys always say the same thing without even thinking twice about it.
XP has been in extended support for the last 5 to 6 years. Big organisations had that much time and more to upgrade their systems - the idea that it's expensive for them to upgrade is naive to say the least. Laziness and red tape is your primary cause.

hagjohn said,
Because some people are either lazy, cheap, down on their luck or just do not like change.

-some- people.......???? ;-P

Why do you care you aren't even running xp? As much as you hate XP and people who run XP I thought you would love people to use this reg hack and mess their systems up.

Should they really bother? All that matters is that this is an unofficial hack, and should things break Microsoft is in no way responsible.

Denis W. said,
Should they really bother? All that matters is that this is an unofficial hack, and should things break Microsoft is in no way responsible.

They're not responsible, but should their systems break, they'll blame Microsoft regardless. Hell, someone might apply the hack to a client's machine, who in turn could think Microsoft has started supporting XP again.

Dot Matrix said,

They're not responsible, but should their systems break, they'll blame Microsoft regardless. Hell, someone might apply the hack to a client's machine, who in turn could think Microsoft has started supporting XP again.

I think you care way to much. I just take the who cares approach. If people do it they do it. If people think Microsoft is supporting XP again, then they think Microsoft is supporting XP again. Really couldn't care. Do you own Microsoft? Do you own shares in Microsoft? You seem really invested.

Dot Matrix said,

They're not responsible, but should their systems break, they'll blame Microsoft regardless. Hell, someone might apply the hack to a client's machine, who in turn could think Microsoft has started supporting XP again.

They'll blame microsoft for sure, but who cares. They took the risk in installing unsupported patches on their current instance of XP.

Denis W. said,
Should they really bother? All that matters is that this is an unofficial hack, and should things break Microsoft is in no way responsible.

Forgot to add: I can foresee some idiot taking Microsoft to court "for breaking" their machine, and costing them money, despite XP being out of support. This is America after all...

Dot Matrix said,

Forgot to add: I can foresee some idiot taking Microsoft to court "for breaking" their machine, and costing them money, despite XP being out of support. This is America after all...

It'd be thrown out almost immediately as soon as the words unsupported hack are muttered.

warwagon said,
Why do you care you aren't even running xp? As much as you hate XP and people who run XP I thought you would love people to use this reg hack and mess their systems up.

He must care, in fact, better having XP patched with security fixes than unpatched XP sending malware.

shockz said,

They'll blame microsoft for sure, but who cares. They took the risk in installing unsupported patches on their current instance of XP.

.. dude read again the info say that The OS is based on Windows XP Service Pack 3 .. so the Patch will work just fine!!!

Dot Matrix said,

Forgot to add: I can foresee some idiot taking Microsoft to court "for breaking" their machine, and costing them money, despite XP being out of support. This is America after all...

Then let their case get laughed out of court if it comes to that. Worrying about this is just plain silly.