RIM, iPhone & Android market share up, Windows Mobile down in 2009

Gartner published its market share reports on Tuesday for worldwide mobile phone sales in 2009. According to the figures, BlackBerry, iPhone and Android devices have all increased their market share whilst Windows Mobile and Symbian devices have slipped significantly.

iPhone, BlackBerry, and Android increased their market share the most (up 6.2%, 3.3%, and 3.4% from 2008, respectively). Windows Mobile dropped 3.1% alongside Symbian who dropped 5.5%. Despite the drop for Symbian it still remained dominate with 46.9% market share compared to number two RIM which has 19.9% and third place iPhone with 14.4%. "Symbian had become uncompetitive in recent years, but its market share, particularly on Nokia devices, is still strong. If Symbian can use this momentum, it could return to positive growth," said Roberta Cozza, principal research analyst at Gartner.

Gartner's results appear to confirm Comscore's figures that were published earlier this month. Comscore found that both iPhone and Android market share in the US had grown and that Windows Mobile had lost market share in 2009. “Android's success experienced in the fourth quarter of 2009 should continue into 2010 as more manufacturers launch Android products, but some CSPs and manufacturers have expressed growing concern about Google's intentions in the mobile market,” Ms Cozza said. “If such concerns cause manufacturers to change their product strategies or CSPs to change which devices they stock, this might hinder Android's growth in 2010.”

Gartners report did not focus on Microsoft's Windows Phone 7 operating system that the software company recently announced. Gartner officials said that they expected 2010 to "retain a strong focus around operating systems." Microsoft said it expects devices with Windows Phone 7 will ship in time for the holiday season of 2010.


Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Microsoft and Amazon sign patent deal

Next Story

Apple says iPhone users don't mind being on hold, a dig at Verizon

17 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

Sorry but from here in China these figures are simply unbelieveable. About 1/4 of all mobile phones sold worldwide are in China. And I rarely if ever see an iPhone or Google phone. In smartphones the 'generic SanG' format takes about 35%. These are mostly WM6. These numbers are repeated throughout Asia which takes about 65% wordwide share.

Sorry but these numbers are just not credible. US only (maybe) but certainly NOT wordwide.

Stop trolling and get your facts right. Symbian usually refers to S60 and not S40, like the phone you used as an example.

As an operating system has been around much longer than most the other ones in this comparison and is much more mature.
It can do ALL the others do and then some - for instance, installing any app I want without depending on shops. Should I mention that only recently you are able to send MMS on an iPhone, you still cannot multi-task and flash support is non-existent? That is really smart...phone. Symbian has all these for ages and without Symbian paving the way and actually inventing the concept of a smartphone, you would not have the others...

I'm not debating so much that I don't agree that Symbian is a smartphone OS, I don't think it's right to compare ALL hardware running Symbian, as I don't see them all as smartphones.

I guess I just see smart phones differently. It's just a few devices being sold by the real smart phone companies, vs Nearly all of Nokia's current phones.

Nokia 3720 for example. Is a basic, cheap phone. Yet in these surveys is counted as a smart phone because of the OS.

Nashy said,
I'm not debating so much that I don't agree that Symbian is a smartphone OS, I don't think it's right to compare ALL hardware running Symbian, as I don't see them all as smartphones.

I guess I just see smart phones differently. It's just a few devices being sold by the real smart phone companies, vs Nearly all of Nokia's current phones.

Nokia 3720 for example. Is a basic, cheap phone. Yet in these surveys is counted as a smart phone because of the OS.

Maybe we can agree that some of the implementations hardware manufactures have applied Symbian on can be somewhat dimmer-witted than higher end "smart" phones. :P

Absolutely. But it's to the point now where you average make calls phone is running Symbian.

Just because a phone has a calendar and Net connectivity, doesn't means it's a smart phone.

Surely things like easy of use, size, processor power and ease of use need to be taken into account. I don't see Nokia's full rang as smart phones. I see their E Series phones as smart phones, due to the fact that they are designed for business use, with business people in mind.

"ease of use" is two of your four items listed. ;)

Of the three distinct items you mentioned, two of them are *hardware* specifications completely outside of the Symbian OS.

And the OS doesn't seem that difficult to use in the youtube videos I have seen.

It has office/spreadsheet capabilities, installable apps and multimedia capabilities. Again, Symbian isn't a high-end smart phone OS like Android or the iPhone. But it has the features that go beyond basic phones.

If you see some of the range of hardware as being "smart phones", then you must admit that Symbian is a smart phone OS. Even if other more primitive phones offer a reduced subset of features of the same OS. That is a manufacturer/hardware issue, not a Symbian isn't smart issue.

Edited by markjensen, Feb 23 2010, 2:12pm :

Nashy said,
Absolutely. But it's to the point now where you average make calls phone is running Symbian.

Just because a phone has a calendar and Net connectivity, doesn't means it's a smart phone.

Surely things like easy of use, size, processor power and ease of use need to be taken into account. I don't see Nokia's full rang as smart phones. I see their E Series phones as smart phones, due to the fact that they are designed for business use, with business people in mind.

how cruel only E series

X series and N series is in also

I fail to see why these stupid things still include Symbian. Symbian is not just a smartphone software, and there are plenty of regular non-smartphone symbian devices out there.

The survey results are void once they include all Symbian.

Nashy said,
I fail to see why these stupid things still include Symbian. Symbian is not just a smartphone software, and there are plenty of regular non-smartphone symbian devices out there.

The survey results are void once they include all Symbian.

Mind if I ask why?

Symbian may not be an iPhone OS, but it certainly isn't your basic "make calls" OS, either. I would classify it amongst smart phones, from what I have seen of it.

Appended: Its probably true that symbian shouldn't have been completely counted, since a lot of Symbian phones don't qualify as "smart". But it should still be charted since many Symbian phones ARE still very much smartphones.

It looks to me that one could say that Android (which is a Linux platform) is taking share right from the other "Linux" (presumably LiMo and others). 2008 sum of Linux + Android is 8.1%. In 2009, adding in the new WebOS category also, it is 9.2%.

Overall Linux-based phones are up 1 percentage point, with the plain "Linux" sub-category dropping nearly 3 percentage points.