San Francisco woman captured footage of her attackers with Google Glass

A woman was verbally and physically assaulted at this bar in San Francisco.

A San Francisco woman allegedly filmed her assault with Google Glass as she was being attacked at a bar.

Sarah Slocum, a tech writer from California, claims she was harassed by patrons that were disgruntled at the presence of the device. While demonstrating her device to a friend, Slocum claims she was then abused by two women before a man robbed the device from her and ran. When she went to retrieve the device, her purse and phone were stolen.

Witnesses at the bar told CBS local that the bar goers were angered by the use of Google Glass in the punk-rock atmosphere.

“You know, the crowd at Molotov’s is not a tech-oriented crowd for the most part. It’s probably one of the more punk rock bars in the city. So you know, it’s not really Google Glass country.”

Slocum says she didn’t act in a way to provoke patrons and only filmed footage during the duration of her assault.

“I didn't start recording anyone until I was called names and given the bird and started feeling angry and threatened, and even at that point I even told them I was filming them.”

Since its BETA release in 2013, Google Glass has caused quite a buzz in the community for its ability to display smartphone-like information without the use of hands. The device has the ability to capture images and video, give GPS directions and send messages via internet connectivity.

However, the device has been subject to controversy after several incidents. Some drivers have been caught behind the wheel while wearing the device and subsequently fined for dangerous driving. There are also concerns about privacy invasion due to its ability to capture images and video instantaneously. Restaurants, cafes and private establishments throughout America now have banned the device due to these fears. 

The incident is now pending investigation by San Francisco police.

   

Source: Business Insider | Image via Android Headlines, Business Insider

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In an article on another site, it was stated that the patrons asked her to stop. She refused. They started hurling insults at her and it escalated from there. If you are in a public place and are asked to stop doing something that seems to be offending or upsetting or creating a situation that's unsettleing to people, and you refuse, why would you be "surprised" when people get p*ssed off? If she was in fact asked to stop because people are unsettled by it (depending on the lighting in the bar, colored lights etc, it may not be easy to tell if the red light is on indicating the device is recording) and you refuse, you're insensitive and really shouldn't be upset at the reaction that ensues. If you kick a dog and it bites you, why should I feel sorry for you? There's such a thing called courtesy and it should be exercised, especially in public settings. That's how I was raised at least.

I saw a guy with google glass in the road, for some reason I wanted to assault him
I guess him turning to face me automatically registered as he is shooting a video.

Walking around a bar with Glass is no different than walking around with a camcorder turned on and pointed forward (whether or not it is recording).

Most people do not want to be recorded without their knowledge and consent. When it is a security camera, people assume the footage won't be shared, except under extraordinary circumstances (like law enforcement).

I'm happy for people who enjoy Glass or their cell phone cameras or DSLRs; just don't point them at me without asking me first.

You know what provokes a response like that? Protectionism, like say a crime was going on there and the presence of Google Glass made them paranoid and hostile.. The atmosphere itself is one maybe with drugs and underground illegal #### going on. There could have even been gang and crime king pins and their crew running the show there.

Poor people have no idea that the world is not a friendly happy go lucky consumerist place that the corporations/government make it out to be.. and I am talking about the public being a bunch of clueless noobs, thinking the world is supposed to be a crime free place and they can walk around recording people and #### and that messing with technology toys in public is an okay thing to do.

To prove all this, a lot of people here have no conception of privacy, and are defending this women not realizing that there are things that people don't want to have recorded, and they don't want people using these crazy devices around them. Even if the law makes it legal, you still have to deal with each persons personal wishes and reactions to defend or challenge you over it... and trust me, they will prevail over a bunch of 'techie noobs'.

Edited by nullie, Feb 26 2014, 5:13pm :

Personally, I wouldn't welcome anyone wearing these things either.

You should just wear these things in private, not in public areas.

The thing is we don`t know the prelude to what happened. There may have been someone who asked the lady to take off the glasses as he/she knew they have recording capabilities but only the wearer knows if recording is taking place. A line of sight type of thing.
This lady may well have refused stating "I`m not recording you don`t have anything to worry about."
Look please take them off there making me feel uncomfortable:
No:
Aggrevation starts, lady gets not only the glasses nicked (obviously gets them back) but also the rest of her stuff!
Lesson learnt: Don`t think wearing something with recording capabilities that looks like it`s out of a Bond movie will sit well with people, doing no harm, techie or not!

The whole situation could have been avoided if she had just agreed to remove the glasses...

I am glad that I am not affected in the least if someone in the room had a these on. I would have them on too if I owned these glasses. Don't like it? Too bad, sucks to be you.

rippleman said,
I am glad that I am not affected in the least if someone in the room had a these on. I would have them on too if I owned these glasses. Don't like it? Too bad, sucks to be you.

Depends on where you are. Here in PA it is illegal to record a person without their consent... It it not my job to know the ins and outs of your device regarding its recording status.

LogicalApex said,

Depends on where you are. Here in PA it is illegal to record a person without their consent... It it not my job to know the ins and outs of your device regarding its recording status.


I 100% guarantee that, if you (and everyone else) in PA, go outside your house into a larger town/city, you are filmed each and every single day without your consent.

rippleman said,

I 100% guarantee that, if you (and everyone else) in PA, go outside your house into a larger town/city, you are filmed each and every single day without your consent.

Actually, everywhere that uses camera for security have to have a sign posted on entry telling you so. If it is outside there has to be signs posted alerting you so you can avoid those areas if you choose. If they fail to disclose the camera the information can't be used in court and they are civilly liable for lawsuits for illegal recording.

That's not really true. You can record and take photos in public places, and it is not protected where you had no right to privacy. Paparazi are legally allowed to take recordings, for example.. if the person had a reasonable expectation of privacy like in a bathroom or something, then you might be on the hook for it. Their bedrooms are probably off limits as well.. public places though shouldn't be protected.

Ok and some of it may be illegal. I read on the ACLU's website though that it was actually totally legal.

Audio itself can be protected by separate eavesdropping laws, like in some states you have to have 2-party consent where all involved parties have to agree to be recorded over the phone, or in secret. Many states and the federal system are 1 party, where only one person in the recording has to consent, the person making the recording.

Each state has 'exceptions' to these rules which usuaully serve to protect human life. Like filming and recording during a felony is okay but not during a misdomeaner, if the recording served to protect human life. Othertimes inhome recordings are excempt whereas public ones are not in some cases.

Recording public workers/officers is legal in most districts because certain appeals courts have protected the acts under the 1st amendment, regardless of laws that ban or prohibit or restrict it.

nullie said,
That's not really true. You can record and take photos in public places, and it is not protected where you had no right to privacy. Paparazi are legally allowed to take recordings, for example.. if the person had a reasonable expectation of privacy like in a bathroom or something, then you might be on the hook for it. Their bedrooms are probably off limits as well.. public places though shouldn't be protected.

Ok and some of it may be illegal. I read on the ACLU's website though that it was actually totally legal.

Audio itself can be protected by separate eavesdropping laws, like in some states you have to have 2-party consent where all involved parties have to agree to be recorded over the phone, or in secret. Many states and the federal system are 1 party, where only one person in the recording has to consent, the person making the recording.

Each state has 'exceptions' to these rules which usuaully serve to protect human life. Like filming and recording during a felony is okay but not during a misdomeaner, if the recording served to protect human life. Othertimes inhome recordings are excempt whereas public ones are not in some cases.

Recording public workers/officers is legal in most districts because certain appeals courts have protected the acts under the 1st amendment, regardless of laws that ban or prohibit or restrict it.

It depends on if you are in public, private-seemingly-public, or private.

Also, depends on if the person was smart enough to know that all they have to do is accuse you of voyeurism and you are likely having a fun time with the police as well.

"I swear they took a picture of me in a sexually compromising position!" was always enough when I was in private security. Male or Female every time we called that in to the police it resulted in tickets and confiscated equipment.

LogicalApex said,

Actually, everywhere that uses camera for security have to have a sign posted on entry telling you so. If it is outside there has to be signs posted alerting you so you can avoid those areas if you choose. If they fail to disclose the camera the information can't be used in court and they are civilly liable for lawsuits for illegal recording.

while true as pertaining to law but ONLY if you are in a building. What about when you are outside? Walk down a public street, while across the street you are capture from a distance on ATM cam, bus cams, bank cams, traffic cams, yard cams, peoples individual house security cams etc etc... either way you look at it, you are on camera whether you consent or not...

It will only be a few years before consumers have devices like this and could help prevent crime if it is known that they could easily be captured on camera by the person they are assaulting or robbing.

Mandosis said,
It will only be a few years before consumers have devices like this and could help prevent crime if it is known that they could easily be captured on camera by the person they are assaulting or robbing.

or the muggers will now hit you on the head/eye while trying to take off/break glass as their first action. Good luck.

I'm sure the patrons would have reacted the exact same way if somebody had their cell phone out, right? right??

I dont think the camera was on. She only turned it on to film the assault.

and only filmed footage during the duration of her assault.

morden said
what kind of ###### walks into a bar with a turned on camera?

recording in a private establishment without consent of the owner is usually frowned upon.

wearing a device, that can be used to record video and audio, into a private establishment without consent of the owner is probably a really stupid idea. those glasses are damn ugly, looks like a couple lego blocks attached to a strap.

techbeck said,
I dont think the camera was on. She only turned it on to film the assault.

Yeah how did you conclude that? Besides anyone can assume the camera was on, the user would be the only one to know that.

nickcruz said,

Yeah how did you conclude that? Besides anyone can assume the camera was on, the user would be the only one to know that.


It also states in the article that she only started recording when she was assaulted.

techbeck said,
I dont think the camera was on. She only turned it on to film the assault.

correct, let me rephrase that: this is looking for trouble just like the last time (with the idiot in the movie); if i walk to a policeman i wouldn't take out a beretta-replica cigarette lighter and fool around with it

this is social etiquette even if some glasshole cannot comprehend these things as being with google for too long maybe clouded their views over personal privacy

if i walk into a bar with a camera in my hand (on or off) i will be asked to get the hell out and don't come back - i don't say assaulting someone is anywhere near normal but wearing this crap isn't either

maybe in a year or two this will be perfectly normal but now it isn't so users shoud a.) keep the use of their crap between currently normal social boundaries b.) use it as they desire but don't be surprised if someone slaps you

nickcruz said,
Yeah how did you conclude that? Besides anyone can assume the camera was on, the user would be the only one to know that.

The lady stated that in the OP. And you either have to say a command or press a certain button on the device to start recording. And it is obvious that someone is recording on Glass by their actions.

But as the OP also stated, these are mostly non tech people so not surprised they didnt know much about the device.

morden said,

if i walk into a bar with a camera in my hand (on or off) i will be asked to get the hell out and don't come back - i don't say assaulting someone is anywhere near normal but wearing this crap isn't either

Let me ask you this...what is the difference between Glass and opening and visibly recording someone with your cell phone? You are recording the same people, they can see and know what you are doing either way.

techbeck said,

Let me ask you this...what is the difference between Glass and opening and visibly recording someone with your cell phone? You are recording the same people, they can see and know what you are doing either way.

for one: if you hold a cell phone in front of your face that is recognised by EVERYONE (i don't think you'll be too popular with this either if most of the people around you are strangers to you) while wearing whats basically a spy cam is not

to put it another way: if you record the traditional way i can recognize that and stay away from you, ask you to turn it off or smile to look good on your video; if you wear a spy cam i can only speculate - past that it only depends on the persons temper what you'll get, but nobody likes a voyeur

timster said,

recording in a private establishment without consent of the owner is usually frowned upon..

So is being beaten up and robbed.

morden said,

for one: if you hold a cell phone in front of your face that is recognised by EVERYONE (i don't think you'll be too popular with this either if most of the people around you are strangers to you) while wearing whats basically a spy cam is not

So you are visible whether you use Glass or your cell phone...yet, I don't hear stories about people getting assaulted over a cell phone and their belonging stolen either. Only reason Glass is an issue is because it is new, people dont understand it, and it looks different. And I will bet a years wages that people have used their cell phone same establishment to record people. I see this happening all the time.

techbeck said,

So you are visible whether you use Glass or your cell phone...yet, I don't hear stories about people getting assaulted over a cell phone and their belonging stolen either. Only reason Glass is an issue is because it is new, people dont understand it, and it looks different. And I will bet a years wages that people have used their cell phone same establishment to record people. I see this happening all the time.

so you cannot see the difference between having a device that can be used to record you (even secretly) and a device that can be used to record you (completely secretly) AND STARES INTO YOUR FACE

to be honest i would be insulted if someone would sit in front of me with a camera on the head even if its a friend - that is what we call 'suttyĆ³' in hungary; the closest translation i can think of is 'jerk' or 'hick' with some added anger and disdain

morden said,
so you cannot see the difference between having a device that can be used to record you (even secretly) and a device that can be used to record you (completely secretly) AND STARES INTO YOUR FACE

It is obvious that someone is recording you with Glass. If you wearing one and stare at someone to long, you are most likely recording them and people will/should know. The only difference between a cell phone and Glass is the hardware. There are apps you can download for your Cell phone that allows you to record people without showing it on your screen.

Glass is new tech...and people are scared/paranoid over new tech they dont understand.

techbeck said,

So you are visible whether you use Glass or your cell phone...yet, I don't hear stories about people getting assaulted over a cell phone and their belonging stolen either. Only reason Glass is an issue is because it is new, people dont understand it, and it looks different. And I will bet a years wages that people have used their cell phone same establishment to record people. I see this happening all the time.


You obviously barely ever leave your home and never gone out to a bar.

I worked in bars for almost 3 years. And often did the photography of the place..... The fists I had to dodge because I photographed the wrong guy/girl... WOW.... Not just 1 or 2... several a month...
And I was the 'Photographer" of the bar.... Let alone if random people with a device that could record any minute without you even knowing (unlike a camera/phone which you have to hold and usually flashes).


It is just NOT DONE to record or photograph random people in a bar or cafe. It's very simple, I for one don't like it either if random people take pictures of me. And if people are to stubborn to realize that, situations like this topic will become a default situation.

Shadowzz said,

You obviously barely ever leave your home and never gone out to a bar.

Yea, dont assume to much. I go out all the time and I dont record everywhere I go. The times I did, it was no big deal and I have done so in several bars in the Phoenix Metro area.

techbeck said,

It is obvious that someone is recording you with Glass. If you wearing one and stare at someone to long, you are most likely recording them and people will/should know. The only difference between a cell phone and Glass is the hardware. There are apps you can download for your Cell phone that allows you to record people without showing it on your screen.

Glass is new tech...and people are scared/paranoid over new tech they dont understand.

nope, people are paranoid over tech that can mean threat or inconvenience to them; and lets say you're right, if someone looks at me with a google glass i SHOULD assume i've been recorded - i think that's what the movie personnel and the pub guests thought too; so why are you surprised if you will be FORCED to get the #### out or take your crap down?

and again, the PRESENTATION of the tech (new or old) is different - if you put your phone on the table i won't assume anything; if you put a dictaphone on the table i assume you want to record me
if you have a cell phone or even take it out publicly (but in a socially accepted, non-threatening way) nobody gives a toss but if you behave like you want to take photos or a video they will - and lets not forget your targets in this case are strangers not a sight of the city or a friend of yours

it's NOT normal behavior to take shots or videos of random people at a bar or nightclub or on the street or you better have a very good reason and even better, some kind of permit to do this - and these are camcorders, cameras and phones which existed for decades
now wearing a new tech that makes you a potential voyeur in an environment like a bar full of strangers is just asking for troube and let's be honest - you'll need exceptionally low IQ to do this then be surprised OR you want to get on the news with your new and shiny black eye and broken google glass

morden said,

it's NOT normal behavior to take shots or videos of random people at a bar or nightclub or on the street or you better have a very good reason and even better, some kind of permit to do this - and these are camcorders, cameras and phones which existed for decades

I clarified my post above but I dont record random people and I doubt she was either. When you record your friends, or take pics, others get caught in the frame. For the violense towards this woman, this is probably more of them not understanding the tech than they being upset they are being recorded. Unless everytime they see a flash of a camera around them or see a device pointed that way, they get upset.

Anyway, I am repeating myself now. This is my opinion and a bigger deal was made than needed. Regardless of what people think about Glass, there is no need to be violent over it and commit a crime. You dont like what someone is doing? Then talk to them or talk to the owner of the place. If nothing comes of it, then leave. As long as there are no rules againts such devices, anyone has the same right to be there. People just need a reason to be jerks I guess.

Shadowzz said,

You obviously barely ever leave your home and never gone out to a bar.

I worked in bars for almost 3 years. And often did the photography of the place..... The fists I had to dodge because I photographed the wrong guy/girl... WOW.... Not just 1 or 2... several a month...
And I was the 'Photographer" of the bar.... Let alone if random people with a device that could record any minute without you even knowing (unlike a camera/phone which you have to hold and usually flashes).


It is just NOT DONE to record or photograph random people in a bar or cafe. It's very simple, I for one don't like it either if random people take pictures of me. And if people are to stubborn to realize that, situations like this topic will become a default situation.

As a former bar bouncer, I always just walked up and said " I've had some complaints about Voyeurism, peeping tom, etc." Then they would comply or leave. If they wanted to be mouthy, it's really hard to shoot photos at a bar without getting a voyeuristic enough picture that the police wouldn't agree with me.

techbeck said,

The lady stated that in the OP. And you either have to say a command or press a certain button on the device to start recording. And it is obvious that someone is recording on Glass by their actions.

But as the OP also stated, these are mostly non tech people so not surprised they didnt know much about the device.

Sorry I'm a pretty tech oriented person. I don't know the visual cues that someone is recording with glass. Is there a blinking red light? on the red frame? I don't own glass, it isn't in my price range yet.

Funny. All these people are probably already on camera at the business. And a lot of times, that footage isnt kept private. Bunch non tech ignorant people that dont know what is going on or how to tell she is not recording.

techbeck said,
Funny. All these people are probably already on camera at the business. And a lot of times, that footage isnt kept private. Bunch non tech ignorant people that dont know what is going on or how to tell she is not recording.

one thing is to have the expectation that a business has security camera and someone pointing a camera directly into your face. Security camera's don't even capture the quality image you would get from a device like Google Glass. Sounds to me you are quite ignorant in your comparison.

Oh please, have you seen some of the "private" camera footage that has leaked and posted online? I can guarantee that it is 100 times more private than anyone filming at a business with Glass.

The people acted like idiots. If they dont like Glass, fine. No need to assault the lady, caller her names, and steal her belongings. That is a criminal offense and just people acting like they are in grade school.

I am also willing to bet that other patrons have gone in to the bar before and used their cell phones openly to record events/people and it probably wasnt a big idea. Heck, I used my cell phone to record a crowd of people at a concert and no one came after me and some were watching what I was doing. People are scared of tech they dont understand.

I only saw a 9 second video. But she sounds like some stuck up chick who thinks the way of "I am not bothering anyone so F the rest". While she obviously is.

I am glad Google Glass is not used here in NL and I hope it stays that way. I am one of those people who get agitated if people record my private doings and what not. Especially if they (like this lady) refuse to take off the device to please her surrounding.

She is selfish and these situations will come. Stuck up b*tches who think they the man.

And you should know recording a concert is something else then recording everyone in a bar. I dare you to record people in a bar all night. Really, Many...many people will not be pleased. And you know humanity, some people will take it aggresively and go verbal/physical.... Your loss mate, same as for this woman...

If you ever go out, it is known that is it NOT DONE to go on recording or photographing random people.

Shadowzz said,

She is selfish and these situations will come. Stuck up b*tches who think they the man.

Maybe, but does not give the right for people to assault her and steal her things.


And you should know recording a concert is something else then recording everyone in a bar. I dare you to record people in a bar all night. Really, Many...many people will not be pleased. And you know humanity, some people will take it aggresively and go verbal/physical.... Your loss mate, same as for this woman...

Look, I dont record all night and I dont focus on another person. And I doubt she did either. I record my friends and people I am out with and many other people are in the back ground getting recorded but again, I am not focused on them. People get caught in the frame no matter what you do and what you use.

We have a few pair where I work and are developing prototype financial software for them. With as big of a geek as I am, even *I* want to beat up people who wear Google Glass. "Eh, she was askin' for it!"

Maybe, but does not give the right for people to assault her and steal her things.
Are we new on this earth? Many people don't like getting recorded by invidual people. And some of these will respond aggressively. And it doesn't help if you are "under attack" (it is a bar its not like they where pounding her head in with a brick) start recording and aggravating your assailants..... Some people might need a lesson or 2 in people skills.
I'm not saying its okay to physically assault people for any reason, its just human nature. You can't prevent those people from reacting such, but you can prevent yourself from triggering such reactions.

On the streets people generally don't care to much. But a bar is a personal area. Usually people go to the same bars and feel "at home".
And I come and barge into any place you feel "at home" and start filming you, refusing to take if off after you ask me. and what not. Big chance even you start getting aggressive.... Again, human nature.

Shadowzz said,
Are we new on this earth? Many people don't like getting recorded by invidual people. And some of these will respond aggressively. And it doesn't help if you are "under attack" (it is a bar its not like they where pounding her head in with a brick) start recording and aggravating your assailants..... Some people might need a lesson or 2 in people skills.
I'm not saying its okay to physically assault people for any reason, its just human nature. You can't prevent those people from reacting such, but you can prevent yourself from triggering such reactions.

Yes, it is human nature. But some were commenting that the lady got what she deserved. Why I made the statement that it violence wasnt warranted.


On the streets people generally don't care to much. But a bar is a personal area. Usually people go to the same bars and feel "at home".
And I come and barge into any place you feel "at home" and start filming you, refusing to take if off after you ask me. and what not. Big chance even you start getting aggressive.... Again, human nature.

Agree, depends on the place an crowd. But frankly, I dont really care as I am sure i have been recorded dozens of times. Cannot stop it, cannot ban it. May as well accept it and move on.

I see nothing here to justify assault or theft - IMO it's the folks who carried out the latter who need a lesson in "people skills".

Not that I want to be that guy, but putting someone's personal image into a recorded medium is actually illegal if they don't give express permission.

The law allows for you to take action against criminals actively engaging in criminal activity.

NastySasquatch said,
The law allows for you to take action against criminals actively engaging in criminal activity.

So if I think you committed a traffic violation I can just violently throw you out of your car and keep it? Sure sounds appropriate to me.

contriver87 said,

So if I think you committed a traffic violation I can just violently throw you out of your car and keep it? Sure sounds appropriate to me.


Traffic violation is no criminal activity.But you can make a citizen arrest and take down the criminal if thats required.

NastySasquatch said,
Not that I want to be that guy, but putting someone's personal image into a recorded medium is actually illegal if they don't give express permission.

The law allows for you to take action against criminals actively engaging in criminal activity.

If there is proof that actually happened. There is none in this case and the people who attacked her, are 100 percent at fault here and should be held accountable. Regardless of whether people like that device or not.

techbeck said,

If there is proof that actually happened. There is none in this case and the people who attacked her, are 100 percent at fault here and should be held accountable. Regardless of whether people like that device or not.

I don't agree with the actions of the patrons in that bar. I worked as Security/Bouncer in many bars and other small concert venues. I know how quickly things like that escalate. You get a few patrons who do not want to be photographed, some pompous techie (I went through camera phones becoming a thing, forgive me) going on and on about new technology. And me getting them arrested for suspected Voyeurism because that makes your regulars like you better.

NastySasquatch said,

And me getting them arrested for suspected Voyeurism because that makes your regulars like you better.

And I am betting charges were dropped if there were no proof that was actually happening. And I doubt these are upheld much anyway. Otherwise, everyone with a camera would be arrested.

How do you tell if they are purposely taking a pic of someone without they consent or if that person got caught in the frame when a picture was taken of someone else. Lots if unknowns here and I for one would never go and get someone arrested for this. You dont want someone with these devices in your establishment, then ask them to leave as owners have the right to refuse service. If the person doesnt leave, then call the cops as they are basically trespassing at this point.

Shadowzz said,

Traffic violation is no criminal activity.

Depending on the severity of the violation it can easily become a criminal matter instead of civil. Recording a random person at a bar however would be a civil matter.

Shadowzz said,

But you can make a citizen arrest and take down the criminal if thats required.

Only if the person has committed a misdemeanor or felony. If someone tried to perform the arrest in this case it would possibly result in charges of impersonating a police officer, false imprisonment, kidnapping, and/or wrongful arrest. That would be in addition to the felony for stealing a $1500 item.

techbeck said,

And I am betting charges were dropped if there were no proof that was actually happening. And I doubt these are upheld much anyway. Otherwise, everyone with a camera would be arrested.

How do you tell if they are purposely taking a pic of someone without they consent or if that person got caught in the frame when a picture was taken of someone else. Lots if unknowns here and I for one would never go and get someone arrested for this. You dont want someone with these devices in your establishment, then ask them to leave as owners have the right to refuse service. If the person doesnt leave, then call the cops as they are basically trespassing at this point.

Typically I don't care if the charges were upheld. That meant I had to show up to court and most of my employers wouldn't pay for that.

How could I tell? If you got complained about at all, you were violating the social contract. If you were a regular, you could put a giant old school tv camera on your back and I would ignore it. But, if 1 of my regulars said, I don't feel comfortable with that ladies camera glasses. I'd exclude her.

Get someone removed for trespassing reasons, or just refusing service is FAR more complicated than literally ANY other reason. Unless you are refusing service for Alcohol Control reasons you are just asking to get sued, accused of discrimination, and drug through the media. For reference search up the Wedding Cake maker in Oregon who basically got put out of business for refusing a Lesbian Couple (please ignore the politics and just the refusing service example). Trespassing is a lot more paperwork than just writing down, police were called, they dealt with the offender in the parking lot.

(The types of clubs and bars I worked at, it was almost impossible to film without getting a pic of someone without their permission in a sexually suggestible posing. If there is a flash of upskirt, down-blouse, bent over ladies or men it was typically enough, coupled with a customer complaint, to get any on the spot result I wanted)

NastySasquatch said,
How could I tell? If you got complained about at all, you were violating the social contract.

Social contract? Of the establishment?

techbeck said,
Funny. All these people are probably already on camera at the business. And a lot of times, that footage isnt kept private. Bunch non tech ignorant people that dont know what is going on or how to tell she is not recording.

You make sense but I strongly disagree. You shouldn't take photos or videos of others without permission.