Satya Nadella: Time to stop the criticism and do something about it

As you read this post, there is a hackathon going on at Microsoft that runs for 36 hrs; the event is being held all around the world and is said to include more than 10,000 Microsoft employees. These types of events are designed to inspire creativity and allow employees to think outside the box and come up with creative solutions or applications that fill a gap not currently offered by the company.

Before the event kicked-off, Nadella took the stage to motivate the troops to build something awesome. He is quoted as saying "This is the time to stop the criticism and do something about it" when referring to the fact that far too often employees will complain internally about how certain features are built or overlooked when shipping a new product. This is the time to either fix those problems and those who are participating in the hackathon are allowed to go after any type of problem, even if it is outside their typical job duty.

The hackathon is a chance for any employee to step away from their daily duties and pursue projects of passion and of course, Microsoft hopes that some of these side projects will turn into new additions to their portfolio. While they may only have 36 hrs to complete an app or feature, if a robust idea is generated and proves that it scales well, you can bet that Microsoft will fund the project to completion.

It's quite hard not to get behind the Nadella movement at Microsoft. While he has made tough decisions to reduce headcount to streamline processes, he really is bringing change to the organization and is pushing the company in a new direction.

Source and Image Credit: Geekwire

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Satya Nadella: 'Time to stop the criticism and do something about it.'

And time to reply to the open letter calling for the open sourcing of the VB6 programming language. Bring back Visual Basic 6

He and Steve Jobs would be considered to be from the "same school" in terms of their appearances and dress code, but I never saw anyone ask why Jobs is so skinny or why he is so "uncorporate". Funny then to see this "discussion" in this forum re-Nadella. Just an observation...

Indeed. Although I suspect that because most knew Jobs was skinny because he was sick, and most likely dying, they actually avoided talking about it. People tend to avoid talking about sickness and death, I find.

With Nadella I suspect people talk about it because Nadella's build reminds them of Jobs even though they are skinny for different reasons. As mentioned, Nadella is actually somewhat athletic - unlike Jobs, who was tragically fading away before our eyes.

Satya Nadella: 'Time to stop the criticism and do something about it.'

I would have said the same thing after releasing those Windows Phone lock screen apps - what an embarrassment for Microsoft. From Windows 7/Office 2010, to that.

68k said,
Satya Nadella: 'Time to stop the criticism and do something about it.'

I would have said the same thing after releasing those Windows Phone lock screen apps - what an embarrassment for Microsoft. From Windows 7/Office 2010, to that.


Do you mean the beta one (singular)?

greenwizard88 said,

Do you mean the beta one (singular)?
This: http://www.neowin.net/news/win...after-uninstalling-beta-app

The lock screen software is still clearly in alpha stage, not beta. Beta's are normally near-final. I can remember trying the Vista, Office 2007 and Visual Studio 2005 betas for the first time - they actually worked quite well. A lock screen app shouldn't be anything as complex, and something that I would expect Microsoft to get right first time.

The original players is Microsoft aka Gates and Baller are just out of touch with how tech works today. Because Microsoft is do big and so disordered things are not not following will. Metro was great on Windows Phones but not on desktop. Windows 8 UI metro design is to flat for a big screen. It needs some dept to it. One of the reason I don't like the new OSX. The bigger the screen the more you see solid color.

Just hope they add a little shading to the solid.

You know what I would like? The ability to use the Classic theme on Windows 8.x - I just like it for some reason. I also like the goodness under the hood Windows 8.x brought.

Hopefully this is the guy, after several years of Ballmer incompetence, to invigorate the brand. He's got balls, he is proving that, this is a very important era for MS and so far I like this guy.

Sonne said,
after several years of Ballmer incompetence
Huh? Ballmer signed off on two of the greatest products ever: Windows 7 and Office 2010. The trouble happened when a certain team presented/forced the idea of Metro on him.

Windows has to coop with touchscreen sooner or later. The only problem was the step on which they started to present the way windows is going.. Now they showed the OEMs where they want to go. they can develop in this direction and Microsoft will polish it products. in 5 Years the combination will be working together without problems and everyone will laugh about windows 8. same thing happened in the transition from XP to Windows 7.

Very perceptive comment "Windows has to coop with touchscreen sooner or later." That means two UIs, user selectable--one for touchscreens and one for traditional mouse/keyboard. Maybe...Windows-9 will fully acknowledge this dichotomy (Windows-8 didn't and still doesn't).

68k said,
Huh?

missing the boat and squandered on mobility both phones and tablets, zune, kin, vista, massively low approval rating from the board...he is the reason microsoft went from the forefront of consumers minds to a brand nobody wants to associate with


seriously if you are saying "huh?" like he did a great job you are blind pure and simple. microsoft is reeling right now not leading and it happened under his watch

TsarNikky said,
Very perceptive comment "Windows has to coop with touchscreen sooner or later." That means two UIs, user selectable--one for touchscreens and one for traditional mouse/keyboard. Maybe...Windows-9 will fully acknowledge this dichotomy (Windows-8 didn't and still doesn't).

2 UIs was one of Microsoft's worst decisions.

"This is the time to stop the criticism and do something about it" when referring to the fact that far too often employees will complain internally about how certain features are built or overlooked when shipping a new product. This is the time to either fix those problems and those who are participating in the hackathon are allowed to go after any type of problem, even if it is outside their typical job duty.

About damn time

Fix Windows, especially its UI, so all users on all devices to which it is being pitched will be equally served. Everything else is secondary. If Windows fails, MS fails. Its that simple. (The marketplace has been telling you this for quite a while. Are you listening and doing something about it?) Yes all the peripheral areas are fine and dandy, but when you fail in your core competency, you fail.

TsarNikky said,
Fix Windows, especially its UI, so all users on all devices to which it is being pitched will be equally served. Everything else is secondary. If Windows fails, MS fails. Its that simple. (The marketplace has been telling you this for quite a while. Are you listening and doing something about it?) Yes all the peripheral areas are fine and dandy, but when you fail in your core competency, you fail.

^this

vcfan said,

they did. its called windows 8.

Come on now. The UI was obviously flawed and is why MS is making a bunch of changes. Glad MS finally realized this.

TsarNikky said,
Fix Windows, especially its UI, so all users on all devices to which it is being pitched will be equally served. Everything else is secondary. If Windows fails, MS fails. Its that simple. (The marketplace has been telling you this for quite a while. Are you listening and doing something about it?) Yes all the peripheral areas are fine and dandy, but when you fail in your core competency, you fail.
Amen

techbeck said,

Come on now. The UI was obviously flawed and is why MS is making a bunch of changes. Glad MS finally realized this.

Glad the days of Sinofsky are over. Windows 8 was not very good, but 8.1 is pretty decent. I use it daily on my desktops and Surface Pro. Could it be better? Absolutely. I hope they continue to iron out the inconsistencies and make some smarter decisions on where they want to take Windows.

TsarNikky said,
Fix Windows, especially its UI, so all users on all devices to which it is being pitched will be equally served. Everything else is secondary. If Windows fails, MS fails. Its that simple. (The marketplace has been telling you this for quite a while. Are you listening and doing something about it?) Yes all the peripheral areas are fine and dandy, but when you fail in your core competency, you fail.

No offense, but have you not been paying attention to MS lately? Have they not proven that they are in fact, improving Windows with each release?

Windows 8 introduced a metro side that was just not ready for prime time, a 1.0 version. It also introduced a new way of developing apps with the WinRT platform, but did include a robust and mature desktop side.

Windows 8.1/Update 1 brought more maturity/intelligence to the metro side and brought more customization for the desktop side. It also offered better co-operation between the two sides.

Windows 'Threshold' seems destined to further that maturity of the metro side and bring the desktop and metro closer together where it makes sense, while keeping them apart where it makes sense as well.

MS is already well aware that work needs to continue on Windows, that's why they have been doing just that since the release of Windows 8. Unless you weren't aware, creating a single OS that can intelligently mold itself for maximum effectiveness across many device types is not easy to pull off. MS is the only company really trying at this point precisely because its not easy. If MS can keep pushing forward, taking on the feedback and improving, we will get to a point where maybe people like yourself and those that always echo such opinions will be satisfied. Its not a quick process though.

techbeck said,

Come on now. The UI was obviously flawed and is why MS is making a bunch of changes. Glad MS finally realized this.


Yes, and no.

Everyone is now copying the flat UI style that Microsoft pioneered. I think it's a matter of MS jumping too far out in front and even now people (both users and other companies) are still catching up.

That's not to say it isn't flawed, I'm disappointed a lot of things haven't quite been fixed yet, and that they seem to be backtracking on a lot. It would be good to see MS having a better attention to detail. But they are mostly making pretty sensible decisions going forward.

james.faction said,

Yes, and no.

Everyone is now copying the flat UI style that Microsoft pioneered. I think it's a matter of MS jumping too far out in front and even now people (both users and other companies) are still catching up.

Microsoft did not "Pioneer" the flat UI style.

james.faction said,

Yes, and no.

Everyone is now copying the flat UI style that Microsoft pioneered. I think it's a matter of MS jumping too far out in front and even now people (both users and other companies) are still catching up.

Main gripe is the tiles. Flat is one thing but having a screen that is all tiles for desktop users was a mistake. MS screwed up.

simrat said,

They were the first one to apply it in their products.

Pretty sure Apple was the first. Haven't you seen iOS 7, which came out LAST YEAR, well before Windows 8 or Windows Phone was even on the drawing board.

Enron said,

Pretty sure Apple was the first. Haven't you seen iOS 7, which came out LAST YEAR, well before Windows 8 or Windows Phone was even on the drawing board.

Before Zune, too ;)

Seriously, who the hell cares who had the flat design first. This is how thins always happen regardless of what industry it is. Someone brings a design or product to the forefront and if it catches on, other adapt it as well.

Get over it already.

Enron said,

Pretty sure Apple was the first. Haven't you seen iOS 7, which came out LAST YEAR, well before Windows 8 or Windows Phone was even on the drawing board.


Actually windows 8 came out 11 months before ios7.

techbeck said,
Seriously, who the hell cares who had the flat design first. This is how thins always happen regardless of what industry it is. Someone brings a design or product to the forefront and if it catches on, other adapt it as well.

Get over it already.

Actually the flat design had never 'caught on', it is forced onto users, if you need to use windows 8.x it is forced on you.
If you need to use ios7 it is forced on you.
Soon osx 10.10 will also force it on you if you need to upgrade to that os.

These changes are done simply due to lack of innovation, nothing more, if nothing innovative is coming out lets just change the appearance, change for the sake of change.

I agree, the flat design was forced upon us. In Windows 7 you could configure the amount of bling you wanted, why take that away on desktop machines? I've got a high end desktop that can handle all the bling that Windows 7 could provide, why not let me use that power if I want? Now I'm forced to have these, IMO, ugly flat windows.

I've heard a few say they think the tiles were a "mistake" but I've heard more say they're great. I like that it's a common interface between devices.

If anything, they aren't similar enough. I'd like some of the niceties of the WP8 interface to come over to full-blown Windows.

Enron said,

Pretty sure Apple was the first. Haven't you seen iOS 7, which came out LAST YEAR, well before Windows 8 or Windows Phone was even on the drawing board.


You're joking, right?

Windows 8 came out in 2012. iOS 6 was released around the same time, and did very little to modernise its icons from previous versions.. It took a year before 7 came out with a more flat style. They've taken a while to catch up to Microsoft in this particular respect.

This isn't unusual, it's the way things have gone for the last 20 years. One company innovates, the other follows. Sometimes it's Microsoft, sometimes it's Apple.

Why is he not wearing a suit? I don't trust business men at the best of times but even less if they try to come over as 'friendly'.
The same goes for businessmen, and politicians who take off their jacket and tie when visiting factories, schools, or being seen in any 'let's get down to our shirtsleeves situations'
All of these stances lack dignity: let others get down to their shirtsleeves for it shows that you, resplendent in your tailored suit, know how to delegate: The sort of thing good leaders do.


Well this is an informal event, so why can't he dress casual? He is only human, so it goes without saying that he may not like dressing in a suit all the time.

BavonWW said,
Why is he not wearing a suit? I don't trust business men at the best of times but even less if they try to come over as 'friendly'.
The same goes for businessmen, and politicians who take off their jacket and tie when visiting factories, schools, or being seen in any 'let's get down to our shirtsleeves situations'
All of these stances lack dignity: let others get down to their shirtsleeves for it shows that you, resplendent in your tailored suit, know how to delegate: The sort of thing good leaders do.


Man, no other battles in the world for you to fight, so you just picked this one up out of boredom? So weird.

Not only is the event informal, and not only is it outside during one of the hottest summers Seattle has seen in a long time, but--jeez, it's Seattle after all. Nobody in Seattle wears a suit unless they're going into a meeting with a company that isn't from the west coast. It's just a cultural thing out here. All these companies are run by engineers. They hate the game to a fault.

I've seen VPs in Pokemon shirts out here. It's just a different culture. There's nothing sinister. Go pick a fight with an evil you don't have to use your imagination to see.

Hello,

Yes, that's typical marketing strategy. So, instead, perhaps you should be asking yourself what Mr. Nadella is trying to convey through this particular photo?

On a more (just as? less?) relevant note, I was on Microsoft's campus last week, and although it was pretty limited to a couple of locations (Building 33 and a visit to the Company Store), there did not appear to be much difference in how Microsoft employees dressed in previous years. Nice business casual down to T-shirts and jeans. Weather seems to trump fashion choices, and, frankly, I'd rather have Microsoft employees worry about writing great code than worrying about whether they should be "dressing to impress."

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

BavonWW said,
Why is he not wearing a suit? I don't trust business men at the best of times but even less if they try to come over as 'friendly'.
The same goes for businessmen, and politicians who take off their jacket and tie when visiting factories, schools, or being seen in any 'let's get down to our shirtsleeves situations'
All of these stances lack dignity: let others get down to their shirtsleeves for it shows that you, resplendent in your tailored suit, know how to delegate: The sort of thing good leaders do.


He's the head of one of the biggest tech companies and a millionaire, he can wear whatever he wants. He certainly doesn't care what you think.

A suit is just a uniform like any other. I think you should be allowed to wear whatever is comfortable at work. I couldn't give a rats ass what someone looks like, whether they're black, white, orange, yellow or as green as an orion slave girl. Whatever junk they've got in they're trunk, whether they're straight, gay, bi or a drag queen. All this is irrelevant.

The fact is Satya Nadella has proven him to be a more than capable leader. Thats what counts. How good is he at getting the job done? Any good leader recognises that leadership is about empowering your team to do a great job and contribute great ideas which can enable you to better execute your vision.

Thats exactly what Satya is doing.

siah1214 said,
He's the head of one of the biggest tech companies and a millionaire, he can wear whatever he wants. He certainly doesn't care what you think.

Well, he should do: I am also a Microsoft customer.

Joshie said,

Man, no other battles in the world for you to fight, so you just picked this one up out of boredom? So weird.

Not only is the event informal, and not only is it outside during one of the hottest summers Seattle has seen in a long time, but--jeez, it's Seattle after all. Nobody in Seattle wears a suit unless they're going into a meeting with a company that isn't from the west coast. It's just a cultural thing out here. All these companies are run by engineers. They hate the game to a fault.

I've seen VPs in Pokemon shirts out here. It's just a different culture. There's nothing sinister. Go pick a fight with an evil you don't have to use your imagination to see.

I think the image of one of the world's most powerful CEOs is a very important topic for discussion.
And as for "it's Seattle after all". What happened to the Global Village all of a sudden?

I'm not trying to stir resentment; just trying to stimulate discussion. I'm British: Recently I have had to watch our third in line to the Throne appear at the Commonwealth Games without jacket and tie - his wife was immaculate next to him which went a good way to soften the insult to the many hard working people, many of who were volunteers who they shook hands with. The point here is that casual is not an option once you are a leader.
Fight evil? Tony Blair was very fond of shirtsleeves; look how he turned out. WMD, Iraq, and much, much; more...

BavonWW said,

The point here is that casual is not an option once you are a leader.

The point here is that culture uber alles on this subject. Who are you to impose your cultural values on others? If I wanted to be offensive, I could attribute it to your being British. Since I'm not wearing a collar today, I guess you could blame my offense on my being some sort of street urchin in your eyes.

Microsoft needed this CEO for ages.

In the coming years if not months I'm sure some bad things will come his way and me and others might disagree, but so far absolutely the best choice for Microsoft CEO, period!

Totally agree. He's so humble yet is bringing on the change that the company has needed in some time, and it's already showing well. Can't wait to see what happens with the One Microsoft experience. :D

Hello,

The angle in this one throws off his dimensions. Check out some other photos of him--he has what looks like a long-distance runner's build. Which is actually not a bad thing, metaphorically or otherwise.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

I think maybe he has hyperthyroidism. Other than that, he looks healthy, hyper is not really that bad other than not being able to gain weight or muscle :p

Torolol said,
for a CEO he looks too skinny

I think he's athletic. These days it's mandatory for a CEO of a company to run a marathon. For a second I didn't see the mike and thought he was doing a Michael Jackson step.

With looks out of the way, does anyone think 36hrs is not enough time to code a software?


Xabier Granja said,
Actually he looks plenty healthy to me. Ballmer was a bit on the obese side.

So you're saying that if you're skinny then you're healthy and if you're obese you're unhealthy?