Scientists Tout 3-D Facial Recognition

The future of password protection could be here soon, scientists from the University of Houston claim, if a "radically new approach to biometrics" comes to fruition. University of Houston Eckhard Pfeiffer Professor Ioannis Kakadiaris and his Computational Biomedicine Lab promise great things with their facial recognition project, dubbed URxD; the program reportedly uses a 3-D snapshot of a human's face to generate a unique biometric identifier. According to the team, URxD's uses run the gamut from everyday to ultra-confidential; be it paying for groceries to gaining access to secret facilities, URxD fits the bill. The verification process allegedly is as easy as easy as taking a photograph.

"Accuracy is the name of the game in 3-D face recognition," Kakadiaris said. "What makes our system so accurate is the strength of the variables that we use to describe a person's face. Remembering dozens of personal identification numbers and passwords is not the solution to identity theft. PINs and passwords are not only inconvenient to memorise, but also are impractical to safeguard. In essence, they merely tie two pieces of information together; once the secret is compromised, the rest follows. The solution is to be able to tie your private information to your person in a way that cannot be compromised."

While the promises are huge, only the real-world can ultimately decide whether this program fulfills lives up to its ambitions.

View: Full Story on vnunet.com

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

P2P Slammed as "New National Security Risk"

Next Story

The Gimp 2.3.19 Beta

21 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

PINs and passwords are not only inconvenient to memorise, but also are impractical to safeguard.

But they can be changed should they be compromised. Just like any biometric "gold standard" if it gets compromised you have no recourse. Anything that "positively" identifies you such as some criminal activity you didn't perform then gets you a "guilty until proven innocent" reversal. Which is pretty standard these days anyway...

Statikk said,
Good point. It also seems like a retinal scanner would be much harder to fool...
If you only eat carrot for one full month, retinal scanner are useless.

Pip'

The 3D scanner would have to refer back to a database of some sorts to link your scan to your identity. The database could still be manipulated.

Or plastic surgery.
What if you had a sudden change in your appearance?
Like (totally wouldn't happen that often to users of this, I am sure) if they got in a car accident and their face was unrecognizable, as compared to a scan from before?

That's a problem with any biometric: people change, sometimes on purpose, sometimes not.
Maybe there'll be a DNA scanner someday.

That's a stupid comment. You will simply have to update your "profile" (like 3d-face-rescanning) before you go out of the hospital.

Pip'

Pippin666 said,
That's a stupid comment. You will simply have to update your "profile" (like 3d-face-rescanning) before you go out of the hospital.

Pip'

How will you login though? You gotta make sure that you don't "log yourself out after you turn off the computer otherwise you might get in a car crash any of these days"

Tikitiki said,

How will you login though? You gotta make sure that you don't "log yourself out after you turn off the computer otherwise you might get in a car crash any of these days"

No as everything will centralised and store in a government server.

Pip'

billyea said,
That's a problem with any biometric: people change, sometimes on purpose, sometimes not.
Maybe there'll be a DNA scanner someday.

wow thats awesome, all someone will need to do is take some dna from somebody else