Six things Microsoft got right in Windows 8.1 and others still missing

Not unlike previous releases of Microsoft's ubiquitous desktop operating system, Windows 8 has faced a lot of scrutiny in the year it's been available. Every time the company has made a drastic change to Windows, it's been on the losing end of user opinion, and Windows 8 has been no different.

Microsoft found itself in a bind after the launch of Windows 7. Struggling for relevance in the mobile sector, the company attempted to fill the void in its portfolio by adding a touch-friendly UI layer over the Windows desktop. However, Metro came with myriad issues and complaints, mostly because of poor choices in usability design – part of what we've been hoping Microsoft will fix in Windows 8.1. And it has, somewhat.

Despite that and the fact that a single-year turnaround for any kind of Windows iteration is quick for the folks at Redmond, we're not sure if it's enough to please detractors. Before installing the free upgrade next Thursday, let's review what's been improved and what's still missing.

Read: Windows 8.1: Six Things Microsoft Got Right and Others That Are Still Missing

These articles are brought to you in partnership with TechSpot.

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Report: Microsoft to let OEMs use virtual buttons in Windows Phone 8.1

Next Story

Microsoft talks about merging SkyDrive programming in Windows 8.1

60 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

People criticize, Windows 8.1 is the best windows I have ever Used. why? Compare to 8 its more usable. compare to 7 its faster, has more features and more stable in general not mentioning has lower footprint and memory usage. and so on...
You don't like Metro Apps? fine, hit start type desktop program name (even part of it), hit enter. I don't know why is this rocket science.

When first using Windows 8 i was a little unsure and kept my main PC on Windows 7 x64. However it was still on my laptop's and after a while i ended up installing it on main PC. Once Windows 8.1 was leaked i instantly installed it on every machine. I don't miss Windows 7 now at all.

Windows 8 boots quicker, feels far quicker and so may improvements. Not had any issues with it at all (unlike when i upgraded a few machines to 7 from XP/Vista). Once you get used to the new features and workings you will notice how superior it is as an operating system.

I think 8.1 is a great improvement but I don't Understand why the music app is not being updated every single week. To me its ok but very barebones at best.

It is becoming increasingly evident that 8.1 has nothing to offer me. I am preparing myself for a big disappointment next week.

Shiranui said,
It is becoming increasingly evident that 8.1 has nothing to offer me. I am preparing myself for a big disappointment next week.

We all have our needs and preferences but I found the changes W8.1 brings to the OS very useful.
As usual little modifications can have a great effects on the overall experience although, at first sight, they could seem negligible. You might be surprised in a favourable way.... or might not of course.

Most regrettably, those "still missing" fixes are the crucial or critical ones that need fixing. Most of those fixed were the easy ones--just window dressing (putting lipstick on a pig?). Until the critical ones get fixed the vast majority of serious users who rely on keyboards and mice for data entry and the OS's UI, will remain with Windows-7. The longer MS "screws around" with not fixing the problems, the more users will seek alternatives. The basic mistake MS made was pandering to tablet users with Windows-8, and neglecting everyone else.

TsarNikky said,
Most regrettably, those "still missing" fixes are the crucial or critical ones that need fixing. Most of those fixed were the easy ones--just window dressing (putting lipstick on a pig?). Until the critical ones get fixed the vast majority of serious users who rely on keyboards and mice for data entry and the OS's UI, will remain with Windows-7. The longer MS "screws around" with not fixing the problems, the more users will seek alternatives. The basic mistake MS made was pandering to tablet users with Windows-8, and neglecting everyone else.

Is there something wrong with your PC that your keyboard and mouse aren't working? Maybe you might need to replace your mobo. Mine have been working wonderfully with Windows 8.

I have 2 issues with W8.
When I connect any camera or phone it stores all pictures in one big folder with no option that I see to do otherwise same with downloads. Xbox music while improved has yet to reach anywhere near Zune quality. No syncing in app, no buying multiple tracks at once, have to buy them one at a time, this is lame and sad. And a huge white box covers screen when buying track. Also no sorting of music by what you own and what your are subscribing too. If you never used Zune desktop client you prolly wouldn't notice how empty the music app is. Oh yea, and no related tab and favorite song, heart icon either so lame.

I have to believe MS has a self-serving agenda responsible for their refusal to provide true phone/playlist syncing in the music app or a Modern UI Zune client. It's too big of a glaring hole for them to "not" be aware of it.

Why? Fault tolerance? Channel bonding? Just curious why you want it client side. If it was there I'd use it, but we come to Neowin. Not sure how many would or could afford it (twice the ports client side).

Quite a lot of motherboards already come with dual nics. And for those that don't, a PCI-E nic card isn't exactly expensive. So in answer to your question "Not sure how many would or could afford it ", I answer... "Many".

I'm quite often hitting the limit of gigabit at home now when transferring video files over to my NAS box. I'd very much like to double that available bandwidth if possible, though I'd need a new dual-nic NAS to do it.

MorganX said,
Why? Fault tolerance? Channel bonding? Just curious why you want it client side. If it was there I'd use it, but we come to Neowin. Not sure how many would or could afford it (twice the ports client side).

Dual port Nic's like the NC380T or 360T are ridiculously inexpensive as is Cat6. Increased bandwidth without the cost of 10G or fiber.

Of course if you don't have a home server this useless for just internet.

I can see it for home use. In the enterprise is where I was thinking. The cost of the additional NIC and the cost of another port, not to mention running cable. Since you mentioned Server that's just where my thought process jumped to. It would be nice to have for home networks. Not sure enough people would need or use it to justify having to support it in the client OS (from MS' point of view).

Jesus, it's amazing how many people just stubbornly refuse to grow the hell up and adjust to change. Once you adjust to Windows 8, it's really pretty pleasant to use. It took some getting used to, but I don't miss 7 a bit.

Very well said. It isn't that people dislike Windows 8, it is that they don't want to learn something new. Which is understandable as well. Personally I have no issues using Windows 8, I love it but I watch others use it and feel bad for them, because they are making life very difficult for themselves by trying very hard to make it Windows 7.

Skwerl said,
Jesus, it's amazing how many people just stubbornly refuse to grow the hell up and adjust to change. Once you adjust to Windows 8, it's really pretty pleasant to use. It took some getting used to, but I don't miss 7 a bit.

Have you considered the possibility that some people who went through the " adjusting" process found out that the experience was not pleasant for them?

Skwerl said,
Jesus, it's amazing how many people just stubbornly refuse to grow the hell up and adjust to change. Once you adjust to Windows 8, it's really pretty pleasant to use. It took some getting used to, but I don't miss 7 a bit.

Start Menu > Huge and useless Modern Menu.

That's why!.

For example, this happens when i search for 3ds:

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/...0298345195_87490178f8_o.jpg

Also the fact that Modern UI applications are a nonsense : slow, expensive and limited. Two words, one with plenty of applications and other limited. Makes sense.

Not all change is good, If adobe removed layers from Photoshop people would scream for good reasons. This sort of "Why don't you like change" is not the issue.

I'm the sort of person that runs beta OS'es for the change but I find metro a horrible waste of interface. They put metro on Server 2012 and it's a HORRIBLE experience. Trying to set up a server over a RDP session and it needs the windows key to get at software. That doesn't translate well over rdp windows.

What where they thinking?!

Lurking_Grue said,
Not all change is good, If adobe removed layers from Photoshop people would scream for good reasons. This sort of "Why don't you like change" is not the issue.

I'm the sort of person that runs beta OS'es for the change but I find metro a horrible waste of interface. They put metro on Server 2012 and it's a HORRIBLE experience. Trying to set up a server over a RDP session and it needs the windows key to get at software. That doesn't translate well over rdp windows.

What where they thinking?!

Why do you need the Windows key? I remote into our 2012 servers often and I am trying to remember ever needing to use the Windows key.

Lurking_Grue said,
All the full screen and horizontal scrolling is just a horrible waste of interface. I don't want full screen weather widgets.

I disagree, it's taking advantage *of* your screen space, something nothing else does, not even websites. I have 1680x1050 pixels of screen space that almost always went wasted when running XP, Vista, and 7. Windows 8 takes advantage of that, but not wasting a single pixel. The Star Screen allows me to pin more apps to it, than the choppy old Start Menu did, and looks beautiful while doing it. Having it constantly light up makes me feel like my PC is doing more for me than staring at a blank desktop.

Brony said,

Start Menu > Huge and useless Modern Menu.

That's why!.

For example, this happens when i search for 3ds:

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/...0298345195_87490178f8_o.jpg

That is more of an issue with the naming convention used by Autodesk for its shortcuts during the install process rather than anything wrong with Windows 8. This is probably the single biggest problem with the new Start Screen.

There is nothing wrong with the screen itself, the real problem is that third party application installers still create shortcuts based on the older Windows Start Menu. Why do we need an uninstall link when everything can be uninstalled from Programs & Features?

Do you really need a link to the Readme file, or the change log? Why not provide a link to them in the install process. Seriously, *IF* you ever read those files you would do it once and forget about it. Why do they even need to be on my PC? Why not have them easily available from their website?

The sooner developers start reducing the number of "Start Menu" links they create during the install process, the better the Start Screen will become.

Lurking_Grue said,

They put metro on Server 2012 and it's a HORRIBLE experience.

I can see the Start Screen being hugely valuable from a server monitoring perspective assuming appropriate live tiles are written for Windows Server. No need to load anything to instantly see if services are up and running as they are supposed to.

Dot Matrix said,

I disagree, it's taking advantage *of* your screen space, something nothing else does, not even websites..

What nonsense. It's wasting my screen space. I bought a large monitor for my desktop system so that I could open multiple windows in it. As many as I wanted.
Screen hogging menus and apps are NOT welcome. We left fullscreen apps behind in the 1980s.
Not metro but retro(grade).

gb8080 said,

What nonsense. It's wasting my screen space. I bought a large monitor for my desktop system so that I could open multiple windows in it. As many as I wanted.
Screen hogging menus and apps are NOT welcome. We left fullscreen apps behind in the 1980s.
Not metro but retro(grade).


The solution, the search in 8.1 is just a slightly bigger charms bar! for others, rightclick the start button. Or a desktop background of icons(no isn't screen wasting at all huh).
Or, install a 3rd party start menu. Why does Windows have to cater to your exact needs, there is a whole big wide world of Windows customization out there(*cough* stardock *cough*). The thing Linux gets praise for, Windows has as well. (there's a win7 3d desktop and compiz-like wobbly windows/fire stuff etc. probably works for win8)
Plenty in there I want extra in Windows, but I don't complain about it and just make it suit my needs.(one major thing I wanted for example is multi-monitor taskbar )

gb8080 said,

What nonsense. It's wasting my screen space. I bought a large monitor for my desktop system so that I could open multiple windows in it. As many as I wanted.
Screen hogging menus and apps are NOT welcome. We left fullscreen apps behind in the 1980s.
Not metro but retro(grade).

You seem to be forgetting that you can stack apps. Just an FYI.

Trent Devers said,

That is more of an issue with the naming convention used by Autodesk for its shortcuts during the install process rather than anything wrong with Windows 8. This is probably the single biggest problem with the new Start Screen.

There is nothing wrong with the screen itself, the real problem is that third party application installers still create shortcuts based on the older Windows Start Menu. Why do we need an uninstall link when everything can be uninstalled from Programs & Features?

Do you really need a link to the Readme file, or the change log? Why not provide a link to them in the install process. Seriously, *IF* you ever read those files you would do it once and forget about it. Why do they even need to be on my PC? Why not have them easily available from their website?

The sooner developers start reducing the number of "Start Menu" links they create during the install process, the better the Start Screen will become.

That'll probably never happen. They still f--king install icons to the desktop! Welcome to Windows 3!

In general I understand the sentiment behind the article. But in my opinion Microsoft should have made each UI element adaptable to the input type (mouse/touch) instead of disabling more 'metro' functions. Eventually the whole modern UI should become not only usable but also enjoyable for non-touch. Disabling it will only result in splitting the UI into two pieces and further increase the duality and confusion that people experience when using Windows 8.

However I don't get the final point. What is the issue with seeing a lot of unofficial youtube apps? The same goes for Android and iOS, as a consumer I WANT to see this. Of course the official app and the most popular apps should be put in front but I do like CHOICE. Show me all the results and allow me to order by popularity and relevance and I'm happy. I want apps like Metrotube to be shown when I search for a youtube app. So far Metrotube has been much better then any official youtube app!

I still think MSFT could easily fix a lot of the problems with 6 simple changes not mentioned in this article (or link)

1) allow an option to run metro apps in resizable desktop windows. this will end the complains and make the windows store a force to be reckoned with for all those apps will suddenly be useful for desktop/enterprise users.

2) allow folders or pages similar to windows phone pivots instead of the continues horizontal scroll of the start menu and all programs list. this will instantly organize things.

3) make a metro taskbar for running programs or simply never hide away the windows taskbar. Metro apps should show up in the windows taskbar.

4) make the right click app menus pinnable and on by default on all apps. if you right click a metro app, it suddenly becomes familiar and starts to make sense as you see...buttons and commands...what a concept! This should be the default as full screen apps with hidden command UIs are not usable in their current state.

5) kill the charms and hot corners and the settings panel for apps. it sucks. just let app makers create their own settings page. charms are a waste of time.

6) please, just once and for all, allow widgets. windows vista had them. bring them back to the start screen where they can finally do some good. Android proved they are a good thing to have.

I whole heartedly agree! I am thinking of trying out Win 8.1 with the Start Menu and Desktop fix that's out there but there are still things that would cause me some angst, like loosing out on some desktop gadgets that I've come to rely on daily.

3) no. no other OS designed primarily touch (as Metro UI is) has an always visible task switcher, why should Windows? Who wants screen space removed for an always visible task switcher on a touch-first interface anyway? Especially when a perfectly acceptable one already exists (left edge swipe, or even Alt+Tab).

5) again, no. the charms bar serves a purpose and is most definitely NOT a waste of time. The whole point of the charms bar, which is performs great at most of the time, is to enable apps to share a set of common commands to access settings, search, share data to other apps, and send data to devices such as printers, and projectors. it may not be the best of implementations for these ideas, but the idea itself is sound... to give users a consistent experience when they need to perform common actions within their app. it does this well so long as the developer does the necessary work. I have absolutely no desire to have every single app have a different way of searching, printing, or sharing data to another app, etc. Now THAT would suck.

6) yeah, widgets would be nice. I wouldn't be surprised to see things like this in Metro 2.0. Don't forget though that this new UI isn't yet 1 year old. Widgets only arrived in android with version 1.5, and they're still not on iOS.

neonspark said,
I still think MSFT could easily fix a lot of the problems with 6 simple changes not mentioned in this article (or link)

1) allow an option to run metro apps in resizable desktop windows. this will end the complains and make the windows store a force to be reckoned with for all those apps will suddenly be useful for desktop/enterprise users.

2) allow folders or pages similar to windows phone pivots instead of the continues horizontal scroll of the start menu and all programs list. this will instantly organize things.

3) make a metro taskbar for running programs or simply never hide away the windows taskbar. Metro apps should show up in the windows taskbar.

4) make the right click app menus pinnable and on by default on all apps. if you right click a metro app, it suddenly becomes familiar and starts to make sense as you see...buttons and commands...what a concept! This should be the default as full screen apps with hidden command UIs are not usable in their current state.

5) kill the charms and hot corners and the settings panel for apps. it sucks. just let app makers create their own settings page. charms are a waste of time.

6) please, just once and for all, allow widgets. windows vista had them. bring them back to the start screen where they can finally do some good. Android proved they are a good thing to have.

Great suggestions

neonspark said,
I still think MSFT could easily fix a lot of the problems with 6 simple changes not mentioned in this article (or link)

1) allow an option to run metro apps in resizable desktop windows. this will end the complains and make the windows store a force to be reckoned with for all those apps will suddenly be useful for desktop/enterprise users.

2) allow folders or pages similar to windows phone pivots instead of the continues horizontal scroll of the start menu and all programs list. this will instantly organize things.

3) make a metro taskbar for running programs or simply never hide away the windows taskbar. Metro apps should show up in the windows taskbar.

4) make the right click app menus pinnable and on by default on all apps. if you right click a metro app, it suddenly becomes familiar and starts to make sense as you see...buttons and commands...what a concept! This should be the default as full screen apps with hidden command UIs are not usable in their current state.

5) kill the charms and hot corners and the settings panel for apps. it sucks. just let app makers create their own settings page. charms are a waste of time.

6) please, just once and for all, allow widgets. windows vista had them. bring them back to the start screen where they can finally do some good. Android proved they are a good thing to have.

Again, someone who doesn't understand the design principle behind the Metro switcher, and Charms. They were designed to be easily operated with your mouse or a THUMB (assuming you're holding a tablet) for easy access. It also creates app unity in the fact that users have ONE spot to go to for app settings, search, etc. That's not changing any time soon.

You're trying to bring the desktop back into focus, when in reality, the desktop is the problem Microsoft is trying to solve. The desktop isn't an expandable UI like Metro is.

neonspark said,
I still think MSFT could easily fix a lot of the problems with 6 simple changes not mentioned in this article (or link)

1) allow an option to run metro apps in resizable desktop windows. this will end the complains and make the windows store a force to be reckoned with for all those apps will suddenly be useful for desktop/enterprise users.

Stardock does this with ModernMix which can be purchased separately or as a part of the ObjectDesktop subscription. I agree it should be built in, but I am loving the app right now with Win 8.1.

Dot Matrix said,

You're trying to bring the desktop back into focus, when in reality, the desktop is the problem Microsoft is trying to solve. The desktop isn't an expandable UI like Metro is.

Well the desktop is the desktop for desktop computing tasks, lol. I've gone Windows 8 on my desk and while I'm happy, Remote Desktop Modern is fantastic and RSAT runs great on 8, I would be lying if I didn't admit when you're busy, and multitask a lot, Modern UI windows are constantly popping in and out as you miss in the upper left and work fast trying to switch apps, targeting the app bar is not fine tuned. It was made for touch after all. I'm doing better with a cheap and fantastic Logitech Zone Touch Mouse. Center scroll has 2 click zone and one can be assigned to switch apps and even if you click through them all it's very fast. It can be a mess at times, but it works, and when it's good it's real good. But I can see how many will be driven nuts.

neonspark said,
3) make a metro taskbar for running programs or simply never hide away the windows taskbar. Metro apps should show up in the windows taskbar.

Yes

TCLN Ryster said,
3) no. no other OS designed primarily touch (as Metro UI is) has an always visible task switcher, why should Windows? Who wants screen space removed for an always visible task switcher on a touch-first interface anyway? Especially when a perfectly acceptable one already exists (left edge swipe, or even Alt+Tab).

Yes. They don't because they're wrong. I've desperately tried to find a task-bar app for Android but none work well. Android doesn't allow apps to plug into the System UI like that. They can't reserve a portion of the screen, they can just float on top of other apps. I would really love a real taskbar but not even custom ROMs on my Nexus 7 or Note 2 allow for one.

Taskbar would work great on Windows 8 with modern and desktop apps. Just have it available as an option at least. With all the room it is awesome. One-tap switching between apps would just be so damn good.

Dot Matrix said,

You're trying to bring the desktop back into focus, when in reality, the desktop is the problem Microsoft is trying to solve. The desktop isn't an expandable UI like Metro is.

Metro isn't expandable, it's a old outdated GUI concept that was EOL decades ago.

Athernar said,

Metro isn't expandable, it's a old outdated GUI concept that was EOL decades ago.

Sorry, what? I'm running Metro on both my phone, tablet, and desktop. I'm running the same apps on my smaller devices as I am on my desktop. How is that not expandable? The desktop would never have run on the other two devices. Also, you need to brush up on your history, Metro in its earliest form was introduced with MCE which came about 2004-2005, not even a decade ago.

Dot Matrix said,

You're trying to bring the desktop back into focus, when in reality, the desktop is the problem Microsoft is trying to solve. The desktop isn't an expandable UI like Metro is.

The day Metro apps will have the functionalities and flexibility of the Desktop ones your arguments could have some grounds.

Dot Matrix said,

Sorry, what? I'm running Metro on both my phone, tablet, and desktop. I'm running the same apps on my smaller devices as I am on my desktop. How is that not expandable? The desktop would never have run on the other two devices. Also, you need to brush up on your history, Metro in its earliest form was introduced with MCE which came about 2004-2005, not even a decade ago.

Why are you so resistant to change? Metro is the past, it's old, outdated and dead end - it should be replaced with something modern and functional.

Athernar said,

Why are you so resistant to change? Metro is the past, it's old, outdated and dead end - it should be replaced with something modern and functional.

Perhaps it's time to leave the Internet for a day, and come back when yo can hold a proper discussion.

Dot Matrix said,

Perhaps it's time to leave the Internet for a day, and come back when yo can hold a proper discussion.

No, I think haters like you should stop clinging to the past and embrace the future of computing.

Dot Matrix said,

Sorry, what? I'm running Metro on both my phone, tablet, and desktop. I'm running the same apps on my smaller devices as I am on my desktop. How is that not expandable? The desktop would never have run on the other two devices. Also, you need to brush up on your history, Metro in its earliest form was introduced with MCE which came about 2004-2005, not even a decade ago.

Interesting how when in 2002 I bought my first Tablet the OS was XP Tablet and had a desktop, same with the successive Tablets with Vista and W7.
As for the phone.... I had a desktop, kind of obviously, since the Motorola MPX 200.
Bottom line: it is debatable what is the best experience but stating that the desktop could not run on other devices is simply untrue.

Most people run apps on a desktop fullscreen(well, entire desktop sized). I know many causal users who hide the task bar by default. Its just an app switcher. Having it hotcornered doesn't make much of a difference. Just some getting used to. I agree having the option for windowed metro apps would be nice, plenty of situations for me at least where having multiple resizable windows on top of one another and besides each other can't be beaten. (like now, video in a corner. IE in a horizontal window, IRC behind it at the bottom. and download status somewhere on the side behind IRC. No can do Modern/Metro).
Modern/Metro changes very little for casual users, many are in the mindset that others use a computer like that, while I'm a 100% positive the way I for one use a desktop, is a rarity. And I can do this much better then I could on Win7. The desktop side of Win8 improved plenty to make it worth the upgrade from 7 even if you do not want to use any of the modern stuff.
Its just a new approach.

Athernar said,

Metro isn't expandable, it's a old outdated GUI concept that was EOL decades ago.

Not only is this an outdated and boring "joke", you can't even spell "AOL" properly.

Fritzly said,

Interesting how when in 2002 I bought my first Tablet the OS was XP Tablet and had a desktop, same with the successive Tablets with Vista and W7.
As for the phone.... I had a desktop, kind of obviously, since the Motorola MPX 200.
Bottom line: it is debatable what is the best experience but stating that the desktop could not run on other devices is simply untrue.

And what consumers bought those? Those tablets failed at their respective launches, and created quite the kerfluffle between OEMs, Microsoft, and tech pundits. Yes, they had the desktop, but what good was it, when people couldn't use it?

Dot Matrix said,

And what consumers bought those? Those tablets failed at their respective launches, and created quite the kerfluffle between OEMs, Microsoft, and tech pundits. Yes, they had the desktop, but what good was it, when people couldn't use it?

Either way you are in denial or " not informed" but I will bite anyway:
When MS launched the concept of a Tablet PC, again, in 2002 aimed it to business customers because, at the time, a portable computer was something used primarily by such audience. It is undoubtable that at launch the hardware was very expensive and under power but, again, it was 2002.
What Steve Jobs, like it or not, understood was that, in 2010 with a much cheaper and more powerful available hardware, the original concept was ready to be extended to the consumer market.
As for usability even XP Tablet was very usable; people interacted with it using a pen not fingers.
Let us see what a Tablet and MS OSes will be in eight years.....

neonspark said,

1) allow an option to run metro apps in resizable desktop windows. this will end the complains and make the windows store a force to be reckoned with for all those apps will suddenly be useful for desktop/enterprise users.

Yes! That's one of the things I've been saying. Making WinRT api able to target both the desktop and modern UI would be a good step forward. Then you can use the UI that makes the most sense on depending on how a device is being used at any given moment.

neonspark said,

3) make a metro taskbar for running programs or simply never hide away the windows taskbar. Metro apps should show up in the windows taskbar.

TCLN Ryster said,
3) no. no other OS designed primarily touch (as Metro UI is) has an always visible task switcher, why should Windows? Who wants screen space removed for an always visible task switcher on a touch-first interface anyway? Especially when a perfectly acceptable one already exists (left edge swipe, or even Alt+Tab).

Um, yes, maybe not task switcher, but every OS that I've seen recently, mobile or otherwise, has some sort of status/taskbar that is always visible. The lack of a task or status bar in modern ui is my biggest gripe with it. Having to swipe to see the time, battery status, network status, etc, is just dumb. Making the windows taskbar visible in modern ui would be great. Sure, there are some things that should still be completely full-screen like games and video players. Those that don't like it can set it to auto-hide...

Edited by domboy, Oct 16 2013, 2:37pm :

agtsmith said,

Not only is this an outdated and boring "joke", you can't even spell "AOL" properly.

Maybe because I wasn't trying to spell AOL in the first place, but rather EOL - the acronym for "End of Life"?

You're not very smart, are you?

"Every time the company has made a drastic change to Windows, it's been on the losing end of user opinion, and Windows 8 has been no different"

That's not a rational sentence. You can say "losing end of some user's opinions"

Perhaps you missed the memo: if this were about Apple, please, just give them a break. For Microsoft they are supposed to be criticized, if just one person doesn't like something Microsoft does (such as Win8) then not one single person on the face of the earth likes Win8, by just writing this I am a hater, and we all need to be silenced because the comments and forums have just become too negative towards Apple while not one single person says anything bad about Microsoft.

Remember, Spicoli, suggestions regarding grammar or issues with the article itself should be done by clicking the author's name above and selecting 'Report a problem with the article'

WhatTheSchmidt said,
Perhaps you missed the memo: if this were about Apple, please, just give them a break. For Microsoft they are supposed to be criticized, if just one person doesn't like something Microsoft does (such as Win8) then not one single person on the face of the earth likes Win8

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

devHead said,
Remember, Spicoli, suggestions regarding grammar or issues with the article itself should be done by clicking the author's name above and selecting 'Report a problem with the article'

That's not a grammar issue. That's an irrational generalization.

Spicoli said,

That's not a grammar issue. That's an irrational generalization.

Actually it's complete BS.

Win3.1->Win95
WinME-> WinXP
WinXP->Vista
Vista->8

I count 2 for and 2 against. Why let the truth stand in the way of a good story?

Neowin .. where unprofessional journalism looks like exactly that ... unprofessional.