Sneak peek of the Metro-supported Google Chrome

In March, Google announced that it would be re-adapting its Chrome web browser with the Windows 8 Metro user-interface and it is now apparent that Google finally has something to show.

As you can see, the new adaptation isn’t a massive change and is exactly what the name implies – it’s Chrome, in Metro. The performance and expectations will still be relatively similar to how it runs in other operating systems. However, the very first test releases will allow sharing of certain content and offer a range of cross-OS features, and Google has stated that the browser will obey Snap View for tablet-friendly Windows 8 multitasking.

Metro support will come in the next Dev channel release for those using the Windows 8 Release Preview. Those of us wanting to run the completed product will have to wait a few months. This means that should people start getting bored with Internet Explorer 10, users will most likely turn to FireFox’s Metro-supported browser or Google Chrome’s Metro-enabled browser.

Source: Google Chromium Blog

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44 Comments

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I'd prefer it if the buttons were slightly larger. Though I still want them to stick to the UI they have maintained for Chrome.

so they completely missed the point: metro apps are done in mind of touch coontrol - what they do? duplicate the desktop browser and stick a big metro sign on it... congrats google

lucky i don't even care for chrome as i don't ever use it

In Chromium blog: "Over the next few months, we'll be smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support"

Aor said,
In Chromium blog: "Over the next few months, we'll be smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support"

So how is this a sneak peak?

Happy with IE 10 on Metro and FireFox on the desktop thanks. Chrome isn't really offering anything by wrapping their desktop browser within a Metro tile.

Aergan said,
Happy with IE 10 on Metro and FireFox on the desktop thanks. Chrome isn't really offering anything by wrapping their desktop browser within a Metro tile.

I am happy with IE10 everywhere.

SharpGreen said,
You guys do know that pic was just showing it works right? That isn't actually going to be the final UI.

Source?

TCLN Ryster said,

Source?

Read the Chromium blog.

"Over the next few months, we'll be smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support [...]"

ScottBT said,

Read the Chromium blog.

"Over the next few months, we'll be smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support [...]"

They should have worded it differently if they actually plan to really change it. Smoothing out the UI means it's not going to change a lot. If they said they are going to be designing the UI, that would be different.

I just read this on the Chromium blog....

(Chrome won't run in WinRT, i.e. Windows 8 on ARM processors, as Microsoft is not allowing browsers other than Internet Explorer on the platform.)

This statement strikes me as false.... I've not heard anything about Microsoft stopping other browsers in WinRT Metro.

TCLN Ryster said,
I just read this on the Chromium blog....

This statement strikes me as false.... I've not heard anything about Microsoft stopping other browsers in WinRT Metro.

Anything to make Microsoft look bad.

TCLN Ryster said,
This statement strikes me as false.... I've not heard anything about Microsoft stopping other browsers in WinRT Metro.
Just because you haven't heard it doesn't mean that it isn't true. There were numerous articles concerning this policy, with both Google and Mozilla taking issue with the policy.

dtboos said,
Google are some lazy mf'ers in the design area.

And the fact that all their web based services look like they came out of 1999 didn't hint that so far?

That screenshot looks like it came from XP, but I hope Chrome Metro will look a little bit better than that. I see that the Wrench icon has changed, but I wonder what that other button over it does?

There are two flags in chrome://flags that enable some touch UI experiments in Chrome, but there's nothing thrilling about them. One of the flags just makes the Wrench menu bigger and I don't remember what the other one does.

Metro Chrome looks like they are trying to duplicate the desktop UI experience rather than embracing a touch optimized UI. Small buttons for close, new tab, back, etc. This could all change for the final release, but it looks like Google does not really understand what Metro is about. Desktop IE is a pain to use with only a finger, and Metro Chrome looks like it will as big of a pain to use with touch.

nohone said,
Metro Chrome looks like they are trying to duplicate the desktop UI experience rather than embracing a touch optimized UI. Small buttons for close, new tab, back, etc. This could all change for the final release, but it looks like Google does not really understand what Metro is about. Desktop IE is a pain to use with only a finger, and Metro Chrome looks like it will as big of a pain to use with touch.

Or refuse to understand.

I hope this is just place holder showing that Google Chrome works as a metro app and they are still doing the UI. Otherwise, this is the worst attempt of metrofying something. At least FireFox is redoing the UI to look like it's apart of Windows 8.

Xerax said,
And how easy is that going to be to naviagate with touch? Not at all.

Do we really need buttons and UI the size of IE10? If it works on the iPad, should work fine on here.

Possession said,

Do we really need buttons and UI the size of IE10? If it works on the iPad, should work fine on here.

Have you used a Windows 8 Tablet? I just tried to use chrome in desktop mode (the UI look's exactly the same). And it was really hard.

And for those that wonder if an x64 interpretation of Chrome is undoable, look no further than Waterfox (the x64-only Firefox recoding) - if anything, I find it far more stable than Firefox in the CP (and the RP as well). There is something to be said for matching OS bitness with application bitness.

No major difference really but I guess the little tweaks all count and all help. Looking forward to Mozillas metro interpretation.

PsYcHoKiLLa said,
Ummmm...Where's the changes?

I agree entirely! The blue edge on the top is absolutely hideous! It needs to be black.

Terracotta said,

I agree entirely! The blue edge on the top is absolutely hideous! It needs to be black.


They haven't even started the UI yet. They're at the same stage as Mozilla in their development.

PsYcHoKiLLa said,
Ummmm...Where's the changes?
The fact that they probably haven't done much with the UI aside (this isn't even in dev build yet...), the caption buttons have been replaced by a larger button, and the menu button is replaced by a new icon as well, presumably making its function more understood in a touch environment.

Meph said,

They haven't even started the UI yet. They're at the same stage as Mozilla in their development.

Hmm...Agreed. I understand this is an alpha build but it just seams somewhat bland...

Still waiting on a 64-bit version of Chrome for Windows, and before anyone says it. I do not really care if you think its not needed.

Ninja Grinch said,
Still waiting on a 64-bit version of Chrome for Windows, and before anyone says it. I do not really care if you think its not needed.

Memory leaks over 2GB!!

Wait, that's the 64 bit Firefox version.

Ninja Grinch said,
Still waiting on a 64-bit version of Chrome for Windows, and before anyone says it. I do not really care if you think its not needed.

Your lack of caring doesn't make it any less pointless ;-)

TCLN Ryster said,

Your lack of caring doesn't make it any less pointless ;-)

Touche, but at the same time something is only as pointless as it is for the person using it. What could be pointless to you may not be to someone else.

TCLN Ryster said,

Your lack of caring doesn't make it any less pointless ;-)

64 bit does have some advantages. Yes, the performance difference between a 64 bit and 32 bit browser won't always be significant, but its 2012 and its about time we had more native 64 bit software. 64 bit processors have been the mainstream for years, 64 bit operating systems are now mainstream, and the major browser plugins now support 64 bit.