Some Nintendo 3DS consoles hit with BSOD

So you got a Nintendo 3DS recently, and according to our review from yesterday, it's a pretty good device overall. But we have a small problem, some people are getting a BSOD on their 3DS. Fortunately, it's black instead of blue, and the language used is more inline with OS X kernel panics than the wall of text from NT kernel bluescreens.

This issue was first spotted in a forum post on NeoGAF, and has been picked up by CVG and PCWorld, amongst others. The cause of the BSOD are mixed, but there are two common culprits. Some players report seeing this screen while playing Super Monkey Ball, while others report the issue stems from Super Street Fighter IV losing a wireless connection and going into a loop. Others also report the issue stemming from bundled 3DS applications.

Fortunately, Nintendo is aware of the issue and has issued a statement to affected customers via NowGamer:

If anyone is experiencing any problems with their Nintendo 3DS console, we recommend that in the first instance they download and install the latest system update, now available online. If the problems still persist we recommend they contact their local Nintendo Customer Service centre to investigate the problem further.

Image Credit: NeoGAF

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39 Comments

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Love how it's Red, not black or blue. The picture used anyways.

Another attention grabbing title.

When you feel the need to go that low it shows what a crappy article your writing. It should stand on its own merit or you should NOT be writing it in the first place.

Name it what it is. Not that damn hard!!

Am I the only 1 tired of neowin pulling this crap? Reminds me of lame ass youtube!

war said,
Love how it's Red, not black or blue. The picture used anyways.

Another attention grabbing title.

When you feel the need to go that low it shows what a crappy article your writing. It should stand on its own merit or you should NOT be writing it in the first place.

Name it what it is. Not that damn hard!!

Am I the only 1 tired of neowin pulling this crap? Reminds me of lame ass youtube!

No, it's black. It has a red hue because of the lighting/angle used.

"Fortunately, it's black instead of blue, and the language used is more inline with OS X kernel panics than the wall of text from NT kernel bluescreens."

And this is a good thing? NT BSODs actually provide useful information, rather than a useless message... "Whoopsies! A problem occured but, I'm not going to tell you what happened or why."

For some reason I'm not surprised about the Monkey Ball aspect. I still remember getting a BSOD (blue) style error with Super Monkey Ball Adventure back on my Gamecube. The screen dimmed and tons of error codes came on screen... it was kinda scary.

Glad Nintendo is working on it though.

neufuse said,
I hate how we call it a BSOD when its a kernel crash anymore..... just call it what it is
BSOD is most recognized in the computer industry vs saying kernal panic. Most people dont know what a kernel is.

If u ran out in the street screaming 'kernel panic', they may thing something is wrong with Kentucky Fried Chicken. You know the "kernel (Colonel)Original Receipe? lol

TechieXP said,
BSOD is most recognized in the computer industry vs saying kernal panic. Most people dont know what a kernel is.

If u ran out in the street screaming 'kernel panic', they may thing something is wrong with Kentucky Fried Chicken. You know the "kernel (Colonel)Original Receipe? lol

people don't know what it is, because no one calls it what it is! this is not blue in any way, heck if you saw a crash on a mac and you said its a BSOD you'd get wacked over the head with a frying pan by a mac lover for calling it that.....

TechieXP said,
If u ran out in the street screaming 'kernel panic', they may thing something is wrong with Kentucky Fried Chicken.

I lol'ed!

neufuse said,

people don't know what it is, because no one calls it what it is! this is not blue in any way, heck if you saw a crash on a mac and you said its a BSOD you'd get wacked over the head with a frying pan by a mac lover for calling it that.....

Black screen of death?

neufuse said,
I hate how we call it a BSOD when its a kernel crash anymore..... just call it what it is

How about just shortening it to Death Screen?

Holy crap, Nintendo are usually gods of hardware and system software QA. Even if it's at launch, this says more about the industry's attitude towards product inter-operability and reliability it general...

kizuran said,
Holy crap, Nintendo are usually gods of hardware and system software QA. Even if it's at launch, this says more about the industry's attitude towards product inter-operability and reliability it general...

At least they were quick to push an update. That's always a good sign.

Tanshin said,

At least they were quick to push an update. That's always a good sign.

But it's evidence of the "patch/hotfix later" attitude of corporations system and software engineer teams these days.

Back in the days of console gaming lore (think back 15-20 years or so), the software engineers either made game hardware that (generally) worked as perfectly as possible, or not worth a crap (overgeneralizing, I know ). Either the hardware manufacturer ensured it worked all the time, with damn near everything developed for it (*cough* SNES *cough*), or was absolute garbage (*cough* Sega CD/MegaCD *cough*).

I'm not saying that "patch/hotfix later" is inherintly a bad practice, but it seems like it's an easily abused laziness cop-out. The days of game console manufacturers and game developers taking their time and going for 100% in terms of Q&A often yielded stabler releases IMO.

kizuran said,

But it's evidence of the "patch/hotfix later" attitude of corporations system and software engineer teams these days.

Back in the days of console gaming lore (think back 15-20 years or so), the software engineers either made game hardware that (generally) worked as perfectly as possible, or not worth a crap (overgeneralizing, I know ). Either the hardware manufacturer ensured it worked all the time, with damn near everything developed for it (*cough* SNES *cough*), or was absolute garbage (*cough* Sega CD/MegaCD *cough*).

I'm not saying that "patch/hotfix later" is inherintly a bad practice, but it seems like it's an easily abused laziness cop-out. The days of game console manufacturers and game developers taking their time and going for 100% in terms of Q&A often yielded stabler releases IMO.

All valid points in my opinion.

kizuran said,

But it's evidence of the "patch/hotfix later" attitude of corporations system and software engineer teams these days.

Back in the days of console gaming lore (think back 15-20 years or so), the software engineers either made game hardware that (generally) worked as perfectly as possible, or not worth a crap (overgeneralizing, I know ). Either the hardware manufacturer ensured it worked all the time, with damn near everything developed for it (*cough* SNES *cough*), or was absolute garbage (*cough* Sega CD/MegaCD *cough*).

I'm not saying that "patch/hotfix later" is inherintly a bad practice, but it seems like it's an easily abused laziness cop-out. The days of game console manufacturers and game developers taking their time and going for 100% in terms of Q&A often yielded stabler releases IMO.

No no, this is a terribly incorrect assumption.

Back in the days of the Super Nintendo and before, games didn't crash as often (but they did crash I'd like to add), because they were a LOT simpler. The advanced state of the games and the systems they're on now opens up far more opportunities for software and hardware failures. I'm not saying it's right, but this is what happens when things become more complex. And the 3DS and it's games are FAR more complex than the old systems. The fact is, while for some companies, laziness may be an attribute (laziness is the wrong word ... I'd put it down to 'cost effectiveness' and the need to get products out on time), Nintendo have very strict QA rules and they would have tested this device and it's games a massive amount. You ever tried to get a game through Nintendo QA? It's not always easy.

Like I say, you're probably correct for some instances, but the majority of the cases I don't think you could apply it to.

Should they get their act together? Yes. But it's not as easy as that. 1000 testers can check a system and never come across certain bugs. Then all it takes is one player to have the problem. That's just how it goes.

kizuran said,

But it's evidence of the "patch/hotfix later" attitude of corporations system and software engineer teams these days.

I agree. Having the ability to patch something later has lowered the bar on release quality.

kizuran said,

But it's evidence of the "patch/hotfix later" attitude of corporations system and software engineer teams these days.

I don't agree with that. As Spirit Dave said, they were a lot simpler. There is a billion times more code in these consoles and games than there used to be. The consoles have a lot more functions and capability, the games are much more complex, and there are a lot more variables in terms of compatibility.

So, if comparing it like that, you could say that modern computers are poorer quality because they crash more often and have more issues than an abacus. (or at the very least, a basic calculator)

I don't think that's a very accurate or fair comparison.

That said, the ability to update consoles to fix issues after they've been sold allows them to get the devices "out the door" quicker, which overall I think is beneficial for everyone.