Steve Ballmer talks new changes at Microsoft but not wearable devices

Microsoft, under its CEO Steve Ballmer, finally announced its much rumored corporate reorganization Thursday, but the reveal still left a few unanswered questions. In a new, if brief, interview with Bloomberg Businessweek, Ballmer did expand on what the changes will mean in terms of specific executives as they move into their new jobs.

For example, Ballmer stated in the interview that Rick Rashid, the former head of Microsoft Research, will now work on current operating system development with the OS team. Ballmer said, "He’s not going to be a line manager, but he’s going to be a key architect. This is Rick’s field. We’re glad to have him."

As far as how the new OS lead Terry Myerson will work with the new head of devices Julie Larson-Green, Ballmer said they will have weekly meetings, adding, "You have to agree on what the cadence is on which devices and services." Ballmer said that former senior adviser Craig Mundie is now working on a "much longer-term" project for Microsoft but would not go into specifics.

Ballmer flat out dodged a question about possible future wearable devices coming from Microsoft, saying simply, "That is one of those questions I think I won’t answer." He did respond to a question about Microsoft's recent anti-Google campaigns, saying, "We have been sharper and clearer in our message and more proactive."

Source: Bloomberg Businessweek | Image via Microsoft

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It's too early for Microsoft to talk about wearable computers. Apple has not even shown them how to do it yet.

Once they do, Ballmer can move on to the phase where he publicly denies that wearable computers will take off. Finally, Ballmer can reveal Microsoft's take on wearable computers, which will be identical to Apple's except with enough things flipped and reversed and changed so it avoids a lawsuit but does not work as well.

All this talk about changes at Microsoft is good, and changes are much needed. But...before going out into the "wild blue yonder," fix the messes you have with your core competencies. If one's foundation is weak or crumbling, who cares what you build on it--it won't last for long.

not to worry. microsoft is pretty experience in playing catch-up. and i absolutely do not meant that as a compliment.

More accurate to say that MS has a lot of experience pushing out an idea or concept that doesn't take off for whatever reason and then another company follows along years later and makes it a hit. Then MS comes back with a new version of that idea and get roasted as copying the competition.

trooper11 said,
More accurate to say that MS has a lot of experience pushing out an idea or concept that doesn't take off for whatever reason and then another company follows along years later and makes it a hit. Then MS comes back with a new version of that idea and get roasted as copying the competition.

such as?

Well two big ones that come to mind are smartphones and tablets. Now I didn't say they invented these things, just that they pushed out products to try and Spark the market. Unfortunately neither lit the world on fire (XP Tablet edition and Windows Mobile) and it wasn't until Apple that both markets took off (iPhone and iPad).

Heck, there was already a watch using MS services (Fossil).

My point was that people sometimes forget that MS isn't new to tablets or smartphones.

Microsoft has been playing with wearable computers for years, along with IBM. Microsoft has a smart watch already. But Microsoft has for long held thing close to the vest. We'll see, I love tech but I don't think the time is quite there for wearable devices, not ones that everyone sees that can film everything.

That's why you have the choice not to purchase it. I mean after all it isn't like Microsoft is going to your house and forcing you to order any product at gunpoint.

Major Plonquer said,
I agree. I think wearable computing is just pants.

Just make sure you aren't wearing (or touching) them wrong!

Dot Matrix said,
Am I the only one who doesn't want wearable junk?

I'm fairly indifferent at this point, as the amount of detail out there is pretty scarce. However I look forward to trying stuff as it comes along and making up my own mind properly, as these new devices hit the market. The "iWatch" could end up being a neat idea depending on how it's designed & implemented. I could see more immediate benefits with Google Glass (such as augmented reality which surely has a big future) but I guess it's still so early in its life it hasn't become powerful or refined enough to live up to it's potential yet.

Wearable computing is the future. You will come around to appreciate it whether you like it or not. If you reject it, it is because you are a whining crying ignorant luddite.

/windows8shill

Enron said,
Microsoft is developing a Windows 8 powered belt buckle. It's going to be awesome.

When I was a kid I had the bat-belt.... now we will have the ball-belt...