Study: Windows 8 to boost PC hard drive shipments

In the fall of 2011, it was not easy to find or buy a PC hard drive. Factories that made hard drives in Thailand shut down for months due to massive flooding in that country. As a result, shortages of hard drives hit the industry and prices went up for a number of months.

Now things in the hard drive industry appear to be not just back to normal but are now exceeding previous records. According to a new study by IHS, the research firm predicts that PC hard drive shipments will number around 524 million units in 2012, up 4.3 percent from 2011 and the highest shipment numbers ever for the industry.

IHS also predicts that the launch of Windows 8 in October will continue to boost hard drive shipments in the future. By 2016, the firm predicts that shipments will be at 575.1 million units worldwide. Fang Zhang, an analyst for storage systems at IHS.. stated:

The yearly rise in HDD shipments is the result of greater demand from the consumer and enterprise PC segments, both of which continue to clamor for disk space in order to hold storage-intensive media like music, videos and other forms of social media content. As downloadable media content becomes more readily accessible and affordable, so will the quest for storage space continue in order to satisfy unremitting demand. Meanwhile, the HDD industry has completely resolved disruptions to its HDD manufacturing and component supply caused by the Thailand disaster that struck one year ago.

Source: IHS
Hard drive image via Shutterstock

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I rather have a huge HDD then a much smaller SSD. I have 4Tb of movies right now. I share them all the time with people. They add what I do not have and they take what they want. Plus I do triple backups of all my other data. Before the floods I could get a 2tb drive for what a 1tb is now.

These prices need to go down. 3Tb should be in the 100-120 area now.

moloko said,
I rather have a huge HDD then a much smaller SSD. I have 4Tb of movies right now. I share them all the time with people. They add what I do not have and they take what they want. Plus I do triple backups of all my other data. Before the floods I could get a 2tb drive for what a 1tb is now.

These prices need to go down. 3Tb should be in the 100-120 area now.


QFT

Thank God Seagate and Western Digital were allowed to shop competitors!!! *phew* /s

GS:mac

moloko said,
These prices need to go down. 3Tb should be in the 100-120 area now.

A 3Tb external runs me about 199 AUD so it's not far off. Just bought one last month. End of the year, we'll probably see them drop even closer to your 100-120 with the new 4-5tb drives coming out next year.

moloko said,
I rather have a huge HDD then a much smaller SSD. I have 4Tb of movies right now. I share them all the time with people. They add what I do not have and they take what they want. Plus I do triple backups of all my other data. Before the floods I could get a 2tb drive for what a 1tb is now.

These prices need to go down. 3Tb should be in the 100-120 area now.

Triple backups?

So off site then? Because if you're triple backing up on the same PC you're doing it seriously wrong.

technikal said,

Triple backups?

So off site then? Because if you're triple backing up on the same PC you're doing it seriously wrong.

Yes I have one off site and one on a separate HHD. Not doing anything wrong, this is how I like to do it. I keep all data synced on my laptop, then my main drive, then an offsite which I keep at work and rotate with my main drive every other week. so at any time work or my room gets hit with a rocket or mortar, I still have a copy.

moloko said,

Yes I have one off site and one on a separate HHD. Not doing anything wrong, this is how I like to do it. I keep all data synced on my laptop, then my main drive, then an offsite which I keep at work and rotate with my main drive every other week. so at any time work or my room gets hit with a rocket or mortar, I still have a copy.


a hobby, dangerous bussiness or just a total paranoid wacko?

moloko said,

These prices need to go down. 3Tb should be in the 100-120 area now.


3TB hard drives will not fall to that price, other than sales, until 3TB hard drives become a necessity for the majority of the market. Right now, they are just a nice to have for the majority of the market and I don't see that changing anytime soon since everything is moving to cloud based storage anyway.

ILikeTobacco said,

3TB hard drives will not fall to that price, other than sales, until 3TB hard drives become a necessity for the majority of the market. Right now, they are just a nice to have for the majority of the market and I don't see that changing anytime soon since everything is moving to cloud based storage anyway.

How exactly is 25GB helping me store my vast amount of data?
Exactly, it doesn't. So when a 3TB storage need becomes popular, cloud won't be a good solution.
Let alone you're paying much more in the long run.

GS:mac

Shadowzz said,

a hobby, dangerous bussiness or just a total paranoid wacko?

Depends what you consider being deployed to afghanistan called.

Meph said,
With the rise of SSDs, more external HDDs will definitely be needed.

True, I know when I bought my Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon the first thing I purchased at the same time was a 1TB External Hard Disk.

I wouldn't put too much credence on the release of Windows-8 as being the reason for the boost in PC hard drive shipments. More accurately, it just represents pent-up demand from Windows-7 users, and possibly new Windows-8 users.

I would think that more and more people will be switching over to SSDs for their OS installations and programs, while sticking with mechanical drives for storage and backup purposes. Having said that, declining hard drive prices after the high cost of them for several months will likely increase the number of HDDs purchased in the coming months.

devHead said,
I would think that more and more people will be switching over to SSDs for their OS installations and programs, while sticking with mechanical drives for storage and backup purposes. Having said that, declining hard drive prices after the high cost of them for several months will likely increase the number of HDDs purchased in the coming months.

Right and with mSATA becoming popular, larger laptops can contain both a small 64GB-128GB main mSATA drive plus a hard drive, or a 32GB mSATA cache drive and a hard drive.

JohnCz said,
increase in shipments, yes ... but I think typical storage capacity will see a decrease due to SSD usage.

That makes no sense whatsoever.

GS:mac

Indeed. Capacity vs price has always been strictly non-linear. At the moment the fine point seems be 1 Tb. Anything less costs nearly the same, anything more comes at a premium. Except for WD Green but they're total shyte anyway.

Glassed Silver said,
That makes no sense whatsoever.

GS:mac

It makes perfect sense, SSD is gradually over taking hard disk as ultrabook's start shipping in large volumes along with a movement towards SSD then add ontop of that the fact that SSD's are typically smaller capacity than hard disks then what you're going to see is a movement from hard disks to SSD but a decrease in average capacity. (The original poster is probably assuming the SSD and hard disk statistics are rolled up together rather than treated as two separate markets).

Side Note: Not really much of an issue given that most people I know are using an external disk to store their big files on such as music collection which are not performance sensitive.

Phouchg said,
Indeed. Capacity vs price has always been strictly non-linear. At the moment the fine point seems be 1 Tb. Anything less costs nearly the same, anything more comes at a premium. Except for WD Green but they're total shyte anyway.

They're fine for pure storage.

Mr Nom Nom's said,

It makes perfect sense, SSD is gradually over taking hard disk as ultrabook's start shipping in large volumes along with a movement towards SSD then add ontop of that the fact that SSD's are typically smaller capacity than hard disks then what you're going to see is a movement from hard disks to SSD but a decrease in average capacity. (The original poster is probably assuming the SSD and hard disk statistics are rolled up together rather than treated as two separate markets).

Side Note: Not really much of an issue given that most people I know are using an external disk to store their big files on such as music collection which are not performance sensitive.


Oh ok, fair enough then

GS:mac

FrozenEclipse said,

They're fine for pure storage.


Even general use. I have one where I put my games on. Works fine. It isnt as fast as usual harddrives, but then again I personally don't mind waiting a few sec longer.

Shadowzz said,

Even general use. I have one where I put my games on. Works fine. It isnt as fast as usual harddrives, but then again I personally don't mind waiting a few sec longer.

Yes, or if you want to keep your energy bills a little lower if you have a bunch of them.

Also, many external hard drives use them.
Now, I wouldn't really put them in a RAID, but I'd definitely use them over Seagates in my external enclosures.
All my main data storage is happening on Western Digital drives, two of them eco.
Can't complain too much, although my 3TB external drive takes ages to spin up.

GS:mac

Yet their prices are STILL not back to pre-flood level. Back in March 2011 I bought a 2TB 7200RPM SATA 3 (6.0Gbps) hard drive for $70 shipped on Amazon and it wasn't even on sale. I STILL can't do that.

mrp04 said,
Yet their prices are STILL not back to pre-flood level. Back in March 2011 I bought a 2TB 7200RPM SATA 3 (6.0Gbps) hard drive for $70 shipped on Amazon and it wasn't even on sale. I STILL can't do that.

Not just that, if I remember correctly, the floods never caused a shortage, but the OEMs who bought huge stockpiles when they found out which lead to the actual shortage for normal consumers.

Tony. said,

Not just that, if I remember correctly, the floods never caused a shortage, but the OEMs who bought huge stockpiles when they found out which lead to the actual shortage for normal consumers.


+1. Remember reading this on softpedia. It seems it was taking the advantage of the situation to rip our money off.

Tony. said,

Not just that, if I remember correctly, the floods never caused a shortage, but the OEMs who bought huge stockpiles when they found out which lead to the actual shortage for normal consumers.

While I get what you are saying, remember that we are not normal consumers. Most consumers buy from OEMs so they didn't experience the shortage at all. For our niche market there was a shortage, not for the rest of the consumers who don't usually buy just an internal hard drive.