Study: Windows Phone rises to 8.2 percent market share in five European markets

Microsoft recently announced that Windows Phone had become the second most used smartphone operating system in all of Latin America, and now a new research report that claims the mobile OS has made significant gains in five key European markets.

The study, from Kantar Worldpanel, says that Windows Phone can now lay claim to an average of 8.2 percent market share in the U.K., Germany, France, Italy and Spain. The study adds that the majority of Windows Phone sales in those locations have come from entry-level Nokia smartphones, such as the Lumia 520.

According to the study, Windows Phone buyers are typically not switching from iOS or Android devices but rather are moving from older cell phones to their first smartphone purchases. A press release issued alongside the report quotes Dominic Sunnebo, Kantar's strategic insight director, as saying:

Windows Phone’s success has been in convincing first time smartphone buyers to choose one of its devices with 42% of sales over the past year coming from existing featurephone owners. This is a much higher proportion than Android and iOS. The Lumia 520 is hitting a sweet spot, offering the price and quality that new smartphone buyers are looking for.

The study also says that sales of BlackBerry smartphones have plummeted in Europe and now account for 2.4 percent of all smartphone sales in five aforementioned European countries, along with just 1.2 percent in the U.S.

Source: Kantar Worldpanel | Windows Phone image via Shutterstock

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Hopefully with WP doing well in the cheaper markets this will mean more developers will take an interest in getting their application onto WP. This will resolve one of the main reasons people don't consider the WP in the high end market.

Regardless of your choice of phone OS you should want WP to do well. Competition will always benefit us as the consumer.

Dammit, I just came because I was casually interested in reading some of this community's amusing comments, but now my shoes are all stick. Who spilled their koolaid on the floor and didn't clean it up?

vcfan said,
Windows Phone users. We don't die, we multiply. whos with me?

I'm with you

I like my Lumia, really don't miss anything from my previous phone (Android and Symbian)

If Windows Phone Sales are coming from first time buyers than that means that carriers are pushing windows phones when new users go into the stores to purchase a smart phone in EU..
That is not the case in the US, For some reason they seem to push the android brand in the US because geeks work behind the counter in US carrier stores and they prefer the more customization than ease of use... I do know that non geeks here in the US that have androids do not know what they are doing with the phones since they are to confusing..

Originally gave my mom a Samsung Galaxy phone and it was a huge mistake. Replaced it recently with an HTC 8X and she is doing great with it. Much easier for her to use. Also nice that it has offline GPS navigation because she doesn't have a data plan and has gotten lost in the past.

Man the support calls I was getting for that Android phone: constantly wanting to know about running out of memory, why she's not allowed to delete some apps, why she is getting so many notifications about software updates, etc. etc. Android was driving me nuts and I didn't even have an Android phone. I even deleted all of her photos by accident once trying to fix it. The auto-upload to SkyDrive on WP8 should keep me from ever doing that again.

Gibbyhome said,
If Windows Phone Sales are coming from first time buyers than that means that carriers are pushing windows phones when new users go into the stores to purchase a smart phone in EU..
That is not the case in the US, For some reason they seem to push the android brand in the US because geeks work behind the counter in US carrier stores and they prefer the more customization than ease of use... I do know that non geeks here in the US that have androids do not know what they are doing with the phones since they are to confusing..

Actually the vast majority of people in the EU buy phones off contract.... They do not have a market controlled by the carriers racket there; not to mention that in the majority of the Countries there is illegal to lock the device to a specific carrier.

Fritzly said,

Actually the vast majority of people in the EU buy phones off contract.... They do not have a market controlled by the carriers racket there; not to mention that in the majority of the Countries there is illegal to lock the device to a specific carrier.
Can't speak for other countries but in the UK, which is now one of the most successful WP markets, the majority of phones are bought on contract, particularly high-end as they have steep subsidies.

For example last December I got a Lumia 920 on a 2 year / £30/month contract. This included 600mins / 1GB / Unlimited texts and the handset was free. And for any Americans, incoming calls in the UK are always free (and don't count towards the 600mins).

One of the few areas where us Brits don't get absolutely f***ed over on price vs America.

"Microsoft is struggling to get back the market share it once had"
Microsoft never had a larger share of the smartphone market than it has now. Windows Mobile was mostly used on PDAs and Pocket PCs, not on smartphones.

"The flagship Windows Phone device, the Lumia 925, has a 1280x768 display, a 1.5GHz dual-core CPU, an outdated GPU and only 1GB of RAM "
Actually, the flagship WP device is called Lumia 1020 and has 2 GB RAMs. Also you can't really compare specs between different software platforms, because you know, if WP is more effective at using hardware than Android (which it obviously is, because everyone knows how much Android a resource hog), then it can deliver the same or better user experience and effective performance on - in absolute terms - lower hardware specs.

"Feature-wise the operating system is still trying to catch-up to Android and iOS "
You just made me laugh hard. Thank you for this happy moment in my life.

Actually technology-wise Windows platforms are lightyears ahead of both iOS and Android systems in all areas (kernel architecture, security, multimedia, development tools, etc.) If one thing is sure then it's that Android is not so successful because of its Linux kernel and Java-like VM (which are both technologically obsolete for years and decades now), but on the contrary: they're successful just because the end-user does not realize that they're actually getting something that's built on Linux and Java. If people would know that, they'd run screaming from Android.

"and the app ecosystem is woefully underdeveloped."
Right. Because having 200 fart button apps is so much better than having just 20. You also obviously missed this: http://venturebeat.com/2013/08...id-and-windows-are-zombies/

"Microsoft's numbers are improving but the prognosis for Windows Phone isn't."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wishful_thinking

Edited by felrefordit, Sep 3 2013, 12:11am :

felrefordit said,
"Microsoft is struggling to get back the market share it once had"
Microsoft never had a larger share of the smartphone market than it has now. Windows Mobile was mostly used on PDAs and Pocket PCs, not on smartphones.

"The flagship Windows Phone device, the Lumia 925, has a 1280x768 display, a 1.5GHz dual-core CPU, an outdated GPU and only 1GB of RAM "
Actually, the flagship WP device is called Lumia 1020 and has 2 GB RAMs. Also you can't really compare specs between different software platforms, because you know, if WP is more effective at using hardware than Android (which it obviously is, because everyone knows how much Android a resource hog), then it can deliver the same or better user experience and effective performance on - in absolute terms - lower hardware specs.

"Feature-wise the operating system is still trying to catch-up to Android and iOS "
You just made me laugh hard. Thank you for this happy moment in my life.

Actually technology-wise Windows platforms are lightyears ahead of both iOS and Android systems in all areas (kernel architecture, security, multimedia, development tools, etc.) If one thing is sure then it's that Android is not so successful because of its Linux kernel and Java-like VM (which are both technologically obsolete for years and decades now), but on the contrary: they're successful just because the end-user does not realize that they're actually getting something that's built on Linux and Java. If people would know that, they'd run screaming from Android.

"and the app ecosystem is woefully underdeveloped."
Right. Because having 200 fart button apps is so much better than having just 20. You also obviously missed this: http://venturebeat.com/2013/08...id-and-windows-are-zombies/

"Microsoft's numbers are improving but the prognosis for Windows Phone isn't."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wishful_thinking


I guess you never heard of the HTC HD2 and WM having 40-45% of market share..... I have been using Windows phone since the Motorola MPX 200 so I do remember those times....

Trollercoaster said,

It's called the start screen. it's one big notification centre.

Which is great and all, but horrible for quickly reading my last five SMS or emails without having to open the app, or wait for it to scroll through the tile...

Trollercoaster said,

It's called the start screen. it's one big notification centre.


Maybe for you but a quick check will show you that this is a feature required by a lot of people. For example I do not want to have all my apps in the start screen; adding the OPTION to use a notification center is a win win situation...We are not in North Korea, people like choices.

omgben said,

Which is great and all, but horrible for quickly reading my last five SMS or emails without having to open the app, or wait for it to scroll through the tile...

Why would you open the notification centre to read your messages instead of opening the messages app?? It's the same number of actions to open!

mog0 said,
Why would you open the notification centre to read your messages instead of opening the messages app?? It's the same number of actions to open!

Exactly....and how will you read a full email in the notification tab? Makes no sense

It still has much potential. Better multi-tasking and more popular app development like instagram and I think it will do much better.

To put that figure in perspective, Microsoft has less than half the market share it did back in 2005 with Windows Mobile. Back then it was projected that Microsoft would have a market share of nearly 30% by 2010.

Big deal. What matters is that they're growing again and doing quite well in important markets. I see more and more people with Lumias here in the UK and they should hit 10% here before the end of the year. In some countries WP is overtaking the iPhone which explains why Apple are producing the copycat iPhone 5C and redoing iOS.

jakem1 said,
Big deal. What matters is that they're growing again and doing quite well in important markets.

It is a big deal, actually. Microsoft is struggling to get back the market share it once had, offering phones that are behind the curve when it comes to the competition. The flagship Windows Phone device, the Lumia 925, has a 1280x768 display, a 1.5GHz dual-core CPU, an outdated GPU and only 1GB of RAM - it is hopelessly outdated in comparison to Android. Feature-wise the operating system is still trying to catch-up to Android and iOS and the app ecosystem is woefully underdeveloped.

Microsoft's numbers are improving but the prognosis for Windows Phone isn't.

Sorry but that's a load of nonsense. As you well know, hardware specs are meaningless on WP as it performs far better than Android. BY comparison the Galaxy S4 is a perfect example of an Android phone that still suffers from lag despite the fact that it has over the top specs.

Feature-wise the OS has everything that the majority of users want or need and there are only a few niche features that are coming in the next few months. The app ecosystem has the majority of must-have apps (80%+) and the situation improves every day. It's the third ecosystem which means developers will port to WP last but that's no big deal - Android users also have to wait to have their apps ported over from iOS.

Like it or not WP is catching on and it's now firmly entrenched in 3rd position. It won't be too long before it's in 2nd position in a number of significant markets.

theyarecomingforyou said,

It is a big deal, actually. Microsoft is struggling to get back the market share it once had, offering phones that are behind the curve when it comes to the competition. The flagship Windows Phone device, the Lumia 925, has a 1280x768 display, a 1.5GHz dual-core CPU, an outdated GPU and only 1GB of RAM - it is hopelessly outdated in comparison to Android. Feature-wise the operating system is still trying to catch-up to Android and iOS and the app ecosystem is woefully underdeveloped.

Microsoft's numbers are improving but the prognosis for Windows Phone isn't.

The flagship is the 1020.

And you've missed the point that WP8 runs spectacularly on low end devices. It doesn't need 8GB ram and a quad core processor etc - so why bother putting them in if all it'll do is suck battery or make the device heavier?

You'll also notice that many WP8 adopters are either first time buyers or people looking to upgrade a feature phone. For these people WP8 is not going to look "lacking" at all. I moved from Android to my WP8 device and I can do literally everything I did before.

Edited by Sandor, Sep 3 2013, 12:46am :

Outdated only in terms in specs not in performance, still blows away android away on a single core nevermind dual core. Its ok though 1080p + quadcore support is coming soon so then at least android people will feel the full rage of a quad core powered windows phone, its the on coming storm but can ye handle it??? GDR3 is where its at

theyarecomingforyou said,

It is a big deal, actually. Microsoft is struggling to get back the market share it once had, offering phones that are behind the curve when it comes to the competition. The flagship Windows Phone device, the Lumia 925, has a 1280x768 display, a 1.5GHz dual-core CPU, an outdated GPU and only 1GB of RAM - it is hopelessly outdated in comparison to Android. Feature-wise the operating system is still trying to catch-up to Android and iOS and the app ecosystem is woefully underdeveloped.

Microsoft's numbers are improving but the prognosis for Windows Phone isn't.

Windows Phone doesn't need half the junk Android phones have, though. The OS performs better than Droid on lesser hardware, and the Lumia 925's screen resolution is quite remarkable.

theyarecomingforyou said,

It is a big deal, actually. Microsoft is struggling to get back the market share it once had, offering phones that are behind the curve when it comes to the competition. The flagship Windows Phone device, the Lumia 925, has a 1280x768 display, a 1.5GHz dual-core CPU, an outdated GPU and only 1GB of RAM - it is hopelessly outdated in comparison to Android. Feature-wise the operating system is still trying to catch-up to Android and iOS and the app ecosystem is woefully underdeveloped.

Microsoft's numbers are improving but the prognosis for Windows Phone isn't.

Your original post and reply deal with two separate issues which you seem to blend into one.

The first is Windows mobile becoming stagnant, this was a big mistake and they obviously did not see iPhone coming. By all accounts Bill Gates didn't think finger touch was the way to go and the whole thinking was based on stylus and old style MS GUI (in terms of styling) thinking. So iPhone came along and shifted things big time, hence the big project of windows phone 7 (interim to get the design language and devices out there) then windows phone 8 (the real project which had to wait for the new windows 8 kernel parts, with same GUI with improvements).

So now onto the second point, the lack of 'high end support' for hardware (quad core, resolution etc.

Many points and arguments can come into play here, but I think its based on MS focusing soley on making the OS responsive and fluid and efficient, so that even low end hardware can run the OS just fine, no CPU cycles wasted, no massive overhead and no 'real' need for quad (in the same way its needed on android). Now obviously apps that can run on a system which supports quad core and are coded to use the power can make use of this processing power, but the standard day to day use of phones needs reliability, stability, fluid and slick UI navigation and after all this is accomplished, give power to the odd app which may make use of it.

I personally don't see the big whooplaaa in having a quad core/ x MB RAM / x resolution display if in the end its basically paper specs which don't give me as a user any real benefit, sure there will be some situations (apps mainly) that can tap that power and give an advantage but personally I would rather use an OS which makes the absolute most of what it has and doesn't rush out updates which may cause instability issues.

Now this isn't to say I'm happy with the speed of updates, I feel MS could/should do better here but it does seem that things are coming together and updates will be heading to us faster soon (few issues have been dealt with now).

Anyway, this is just my opinion, but I like to think its based on logic/fact and reason.

jakem1 said,
Sorry but that's a load of nonsense. As you well know, hardware specs are meaningless on WP as it performs far better than Android. BY comparison the Galaxy S4 is a perfect example of an Android phone that still suffers from lag despite the fact that it has over the top specs.

Nobody is buying quad-core Android handsets to navigate the operating system slightly more smoothly or to browse Facebook - they're doing so for apps, particularly games. The Windows Phone ecosystem is still improving but every review mentions it as a limitation rather than an asset.

Microsoft has also placed too many limitations on the operating system. That is best evidenced by the fact that Windows Phone doesn't yet support 1080p while Android already supports 4K. It is simply behind the curve. You're talking about underspecced phones with a less developed app ecosystem that are priced the same as top-end Android handsets.

Trollercoaster said,
The flagship is the 1020

Same difference, only it has 2GB RAM. It's still woefully underspecced in comparison to Android handsets.

I'm looking at getting a new phone at the moment and while I considered the Lumia 925 and 1020 they're just too underpowered for my needs. Another factor is that there are no Windows Phone devices with 5"+ displays, which is what I'm looking for. Windows Phone just doesn't do what I want from it.

psionicinversion said,
Outdated only in terms in specs not in performance, still blows away android away on a single core nevermind dual core.

All the benchmarks say otherwise.

Dot Matrix said,
The OS performs better than Droid on lesser hardware, and the Lumia 925's screen resolution is quite remarkable.

No, it's not remarkable. The HTC One's display is remarkable.

duddit2 said,
I personally don't see the big whooplaaa in having a quad core/ x MB RAM / x resolution display if in the end its basically paper specs which don't give me as a user any real benefit, sure there will be some situations (apps mainly) that can tap that power and give an advantage but personally I would rather use an OS which makes the absolute most of what it has and doesn't rush out updates which may cause instability issues.

Most people buy phones on two-year contracts, meaning that what seems powerful now is soon hopelessly outdated. In that time many new and innovative apps are released that leverage that power.

sanctified said,
Specs are just for bragging. What matters is the expierence. In this regard WP8 offers the most fluid experience yet.

No, specs are for utilising. And if you're talking about the experience then you have to factor in the lack of apps and lower specs associated with Windows Phone devices.

All this discussion ignores iOS, which also has a very fluid interface and has the best app ecosystem out there. I haven't seen any reason to pick Windows Phone over iOS.

theyarecomingforyou said,

just too underpowered for my needs. Another factor is that there are no Windows Phone devices with 5"+ displays, which is what I'm looking for. Windows Phone just doesn't do what I want from it.

What needs are those? Have you used a WP8 device? I challenge you to. I have possibly one of the lowest end on the market (Ascend W1) and it's way sharper and smoother than the old android phone I had for a year...which was way more "powerful". This is why WP8 is gaining traction with people looking for a phone that offers great performance for not much money. It's why WP8 can run on hardware that would crawl on iOS or android...leading to increased uptake in markets where people don't have hundreds of dollars sitting around to buy a phone (eg Latin America). It's a good strategy...I can see them mopping up big chunks of market share and then when the new xbox and such like come along using compatible OSes it'll be even more interesting.

Ativ S is 4.8" but if the 0.2" difference is a killer for you then you're probably better off on android where you can drool over "specs". It's essentially a Galaxy S3 running WP...and I don't think anyone would call an S3 "underpowered".

theyarecomingforyou said,

It is a big deal, actually. Microsoft is struggling to get back the market share it once had, offering phones that are behind the curve when it comes to the competition. The flagship Windows Phone device, the Lumia 925, has a 1280x768 display, a 1.5GHz dual-core CPU, an outdated GPU and only 1GB of RAM - it is hopelessly outdated in comparison to Android. Feature-wise the operating system is still trying to catch-up to Android and iOS and the app ecosystem is woefully underdeveloped.

Microsoft's numbers are improving but the prognosis for Windows Phone isn't.

Then why can that same Windows Phone with supposedly outdated specs, run high end games like NOVA 3 and Modern Combat 4 smoother than any Android devices can, including the flagship Galaxy S4.

theyarecomingforyou said,
To put that figure in perspective, Microsoft has less than half the market share it did back in 2005 with Windows Mobile. Back then it was projected that Microsoft would have a market share of nearly 30% by 2010.

after all the replies followed by the obvious 'nah nah nah nahhhh i cant hear you' style response, there is no further point in this mini debate.

jakem1 said,
Big deal. What matters is that they're growing again and doing quite well in important markets. I see more and more people with Lumias here in the UK and they should hit 10% here before the end of the year. In some countries WP is overtaking the iPhone which explains why Apple are producing the copycat iPhone 5C and redoing iOS.

What the article does not mention is that in Italy, which is the trendiest market, WP was slightly lower and in China, and this is very weird, was down almost 40%.
http://www.wpcentral.com/kanta...rope-progress-still-slow-us

neo158 said,
Then why can that same Windows Phone with supposedly outdated specs, run high end games like NOVA 3 and Modern Combat 4 smoother than any Android devices can, including the flagship Galaxy S4.

I have yet to see any evidence they can. All performance benchmarks I've seen put the GS4 way ahead of any Windows Phone device. And you shouldn't forget that the GS4 has twice the resolution of ANY Windows Phone device, meaning there will be an obvious difference in image quality.

You also fail to recognise that Modern Combat 4 runs on Android and iOS devices with 512MB RAM but requires 1GB on Windows Phone.

At the end of the day I see no advantage to picking a Windows Phone device over an Android one.

can you even compare? back in 2005 the smartphone market was so small, so 30% of THAT market is really nothing compared to 8% of today's market

Julius Caro said,
can you even compare? back in 2005 the smartphone market was so small, so 30% of THAT market is really nothing compared to 8% of today's market

The figure I quoted relates to mobile operating systems, not just smartphones.

It will be interesting to see how well Windows/Phone does if Winodws RT and Windows Phone merges as its been reported that that is the direction MS is going. Once the stores are unified you could see the one purchase run everywhere including XBox One. Once MS has a more cohesive ecosystem it may prove to be the most compelling environment since by then a number of businesses may have upgraded. Time will tell.

Drewidian said,
It will be interesting to see how well Windows/Phone does if Winodws RT and Windows Phone merges as its been reported that that is the direction MS is going. Once the stores are unified you could see the one purchase run everywhere including XBox One. Once MS has a more cohesive ecosystem it may prove to be the most compelling environment since by then a number of businesses may have upgraded. Time will tell.

Theyre probably banking on Xbox boosting their sales and maybe getting Dev's to come out more. if the platform got lots of apps, it would really take off. App quality needs to be improved to, but i suppose thats something that comes with time.