Taiwan's miCard chosen as global memory card standard

A Taiwanese research institute has produced a new global memory card standard, called the miCard (Multiple Interface Card), designed to work in smaller consumer gadgets such as digital cameras, mobile phones and any device with a USB plug, which are common on PCs.

The purpose of the card is to make transferring pictures, songs and other data between gadgets and PCs easier. The card won the stamp of approval from the MultiMedia Card Association yesterday and is expected to be available globally starting in the third quarter.

The cards will initially store 8GB, but in the future, may be capable of up to 2TB.

News source: ComputerWorld

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From the article:

"Users will not only benefit from the versatility of the card, but also its speed. The miCard will transfer data at 480Mbit/sec, and throughput will improve over time." That works out to 60 MB per second. Not too shabby for a first version.

MysticSentinel said,
From the article:

"Users will not only benefit from the versatility of the card, but also its speed. The miCard will transfer data at 480Mbit/sec, and throughput will improve over time." That works out to 60 MB per second. Not too shabby for a first version.

Yea thats USB 2.0 spec, but you know nothing works at the full speed like it is advertised/marketed.. so try.... 20-30mb/s as stated earlier

From the original article, it sounds like this is a push by the memory card makers to get in on the act themselves. Sick of paying royalties to sandisk and the like on razor-thin-margin products, they've decided to develop their own standard and make those instead. If this means even *cheaper* flash memory in even *more* devices (i'm assuming readers/writers will be royalty free as well? but that might be wishful thinking..) then I say the king (SD) is dead! Long Live the King! (micards)

Ah, finally...something to add to my collection of MMC, SD, MiniSD, Memory Stick, Memory Stick Pro, Memory Stick Duo, Memory Stick Pro Duo, Compact Flash, Compact Flash II, etc.

I can't wait!
/sarcasm

CrimsonRedMk said,
Ah, finally...something to add to my collection of MMC, SD, MiniSD, Memory Stick, Memory Stick Pro, Memory Stick Duo, Memory Stick Pro Duo, Compact Flash, Compact Flash II, etc.

I can't wait!
/sarcasm

you don't have any microSD cards?? what are you, from 2005?

...and no xD; let's not even get started on different speeds too.

But your post sums up why we need one proprietary format, hopefully it will take off and save the consumer a lot of hassle.

i wonder how the fast the transfer speeds are tho...
cuz itll take a LONG time to transfer 2TBs of files at 20mb/s :suspicious:

riku0116 said,
i wonder how the fast the transfer speeds are tho...
cuz itll take a LONG time to transfer 2TBs of files at 20mb/s :suspicious:

you can't really go much faster than that on a USB 2.0 connection anyway

Here hoping sony drops the memory **** from his consumer cameras. I really like their cameras, but stayed away from them just because of the card.

well if this will actually be the standard for all devices then this is great for everyone. i don't know if it's going to work out that way.

This is relevant to my interests.

I wonder how quick they'll be to implement it. Becuase, yeah, standards are good. I thought SD was the standard though, doubt this'll catch on fast...

PureLegend said,
This is relevant to my interests.

I wonder how quick they'll be to implement it. Becuase, yeah, standards are good. I thought SD was the standard though, doubt this'll catch on fast...

SD is a proprietary format that you have to pay a license to use (MMC uses the same interface and it's free, but it's slower, so you can use SD cards for free in your devices, but it'll be slow). I'm wondering if this one will be free for all uses or will there be a licensing cost?

So far, 12 Taiwanese companies have signed on to manufacture the miCard, according to its inventor, the Industrial Technology Research Institute. Officials expect local companies to save $40 million in licensing fees thanks to the card, in addition to profiting from sales. Taiwanese companies will not have to pay royalties to make miCards or related technology.

Seems liike a good thing, in that case.