Tech specs of Microsoft's next gen Surface released

Microsoft has just started taking pre-orders for its second iteration of the Microsoft Surface and many have been wondering what is actually powering the device. Neowin has been sent the official spec list which you can see below.

The AMD Athlon X2 245e is the CPU that is driving all the goods behind the scene with help from an AMD Radeon HD 6750 with 1 GB of memory. While all of this information is not new, we do know that the specs have remained the same since the product was first announced back in January.

Other tidbits, for those not aware about the product, are that it can support up to 50 touch points. The copious amount of inputs will allow multiple users to interact with the device at one time.

Overall, there is nothing outrageously shocking about the hardware powering the Surface as the true magic is baked into the code that runs the product. The only thing remaining at this point is how do we get one into our living rooms to replace our boring coffee tables without breaking the bank? 

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Lumia 800 update to be released soon

Next Story

Windows 8 secure boot loader reportedly bypassed ..or not [Update]

25 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

Other tidbits, for those not aware about the product, are that it can support up to 50 touch points. The copious amount of inputs will allow multiple users to interact with the device at one time

Which all Windows 7 systems support if the hardware offers the functionality. It also support more than just 'touch points' as the input points can be shapes/images have pressure information and other input data beyond just 'touch points'. A flashlight can even be used as a input device, as it uses imaging based input recognition, and the concept of 'touch' is the device 'seeing' fingers on the screen.

Sad that the iPhone/iPad have dumbed the general understanding and concepts of touch interaction down to being 2 or 4 points on a screen, with no regard to what is touching it.

Weird that even on capacitive screen Microsoft and other companies were doing implied pressure sensitive and actual pressure sensitive input with digitizer quality pressure, angle, tilt, high resolution velocity, and now that the iPad world is popular all of this advance input is lost on developers and the general population that are ok with points of touch instead of rich data about the points of touch.

Even the ZuneHD used implied pressure, and it assisted in the navigation of the UI as it could sense if the user was swiping or pressing easier than using velocity and other tricks to figure out the user's intent.

This was so disregarded in the general public and with OEM touch screen drivers by Apple creating the societal defacto standard of 'touch' that the WP7 team left that part of the API set out, as developers had no use for it, didn't understand it, and the touch screen controllers stopped supporting it in hardware.


Overall, there is nothing outrageously shocking about the hardware powering the Surface as the true magic is baked into the code that runs the product.

Yes, Windows 7... The only additional features are Apps it comes with that takes advantage of the rich touch and multi-user interaction, that is all built into Windows 7. The real magic is the image display, which if more users had access to, could be running Surface Applications on a standard copy of Windows 7 today.

Sadly people and developers have been 'told' that Windows 7 isn't a touch OS and doesn't do touch well, yet the PREMIUM touch screen product in the world, 'Microsoft Surface' is just running Windows 7. So users don't buy touch screen monitors and developers don't write touch enabled Apps, and the Myth about Windows 7 becomes partially true, in that it isn't used as a touch OS.

Windows 7 has more touch hardware and touch API support built into it than any other OS in the world, yet all we hear is Windows 7 sucks for touch, blah, ignorance, blah, blah...

Geesh...

drazgoosh said,
I would've thought it would have higher specs. Higher RAM, bigger HDD, more cores, better graphics card.

Why?
The key to this piece of hardware is the PixelSense technology and the surface software. When building a purpose built computer for commercial use, the actual computer specs of the are nailed down early on , as not to develop for a moving target.

The system is powerful enough to run the surface software and various other components.
This will be powering retail displays, not playing crysis.

The hardware only has to perform based on the load for which it's designed.

drazgoosh said,
I would've thought it would have higher specs. Higher RAM, bigger HDD, more cores, better graphics card.

Why, it isn't running Android, it is only running a desktop version of Windows 7.

Windows 7 can do what Surface is doing on netbook class technology, in fact there is a Microsoft R&D video from a few years ago, using infrared imaging technology on a low end notebook, that was doing all the things Surface is doing, and this was also running on Vista at the time, which did eat more RAM for Aero.

drazgoosh said,
I would've thought it would have higher specs. Higher RAM, bigger HDD, more cores, better graphics card.

+1 me too
I thought the specs were a little outdated for where we're at now.

I wonder what was on Gates mind when he first introduced Surface and he was sitting next to Jobs on stage, and Steve showed him his Iphone. What is the inside story on what came first and when. And whether or not MS actually had multi-touch plans for the phone all along, or not.

jimmyfal said,
I wonder what was on Gates mind when he first introduced Surface and he was sitting next to Jobs on stage, and Steve showed him his Iphone. What is the inside story on what came first and when. And whether or not MS actually had multi-touch plans for the phone all along, or not.

Considering the TED video that Apple used for the iPhone UI and gestures was presented a year before the iPhone hit development, and Microsoft was behind pieces of the TED Video and had working multi-touch input technologies in R&D going back to the 1980s, I think Steve Jobs did an awesome job of conning you and the rest of the world they had any relevance in the world of touch interaction.

Microsoft Surface is not just 'touch' it is an imaging based input device that can see fingers and touch points, but can also see light from a flashlight, recognize shapes and images, and a massive about of object and other non-touch input in addition to a single point on the screen reporting single pixel coordinates like the iPhone does. Sure the iPhone can see 4 of these points, but it doesn't get any information like pressure, size of the finger, nor can it comprehend and process 50 of this rich points at the same time across several applications for multiple user interaction.

PS... This is just Windows 7, other than the cute Surface Apps running, the rest is the same OS millions of people are using everyday, as Windows 7 is the richest touch/input OS technology in the world. (Despite the myth it is a bad touch OS.)

este said,
AMD, eh? And only 4 gigs of ram......

Someone has to buy AMD hardware.


On a serious note, it doesn't need a ton of RAM, it's not a supercomputer, why does 4GB seem low?

GP007 said,

Someone has to buy AMD hardware.


On a serious note, it doesn't need a ton of RAM, it's not a supercomputer, why does 4GB seem low?

I figured that due to the nature of the device (multi touch points, applications requiring a lot of resources (when combined with the multi touch even)) it would need more to handle what will be done on it. 4gb just seems... low. That would have been acceptable 2 years ago maybe.

bdsams said,
Good to see that they didn't change, considering it was announced almost a year ago, they could have updated them .

My Windows Desktop has 6X the memory, Quad core. My tablets (Xoom and iPad 2) are portable. And I spent way less on these items than 1 surface table. I'll stick to that

WhatWarning said,

My Windows Desktop has 6X the memory, Quad core. My tablets (Xoom and iPad 2) are portable. And I spent way less on these items than 1 surface table. I'll stick to that

*clap* And? The cpu and ram aren't the key here, it's the screen, that's where all the cost is on this.

GP007 said,

*clap* And? The cpu and ram aren't the key here, it's the screen, that's where all the cost is on this.

Seriously lets face it, this table is not for the home. We all know that.

WhatWarning said,

Seriously lets face it, this table is not for the home. We all know that.

Seeing what people with money spend on for their home it all depends on the person in question.

GP007 said,

Seeing what people with money spend on for their home it all depends on the person in question.

Absolutely, trust me as stupid as the item sounds for everyday use, I would buy one if I had the money. I love gadgets. If I was a part of the 1%, I would Occupy that table.

WhatWarning said,
... I spent way less on these items than 1 surface table. I'll stick to that

Good for you. Your desktop PC doesn't have 40" touchscreen with PixelSense and Gorilla Glass capable of receiving 50 touchpoints at once!

dotf said,

Good for you. Your desktop PC doesn't have 40" touchscreen with PixelSense and Gorilla Glass capable of receiving 50 touchpoints at once!

No but my iPad 2 and Xoom will suffice. I can actually lean back and relax and use it.

But like I said before, this is not meant for the home. If you have 1, I envy you. Not just because you have 1, but because you have money to throw away on it.

if you really want to make me mad, tell me you have 1 in each room.

Quick Shot said,
How much do these things go for?

Here's a snip-snip from the pre-order article mentioned above:
"While there is no official posting on price, Long Zheng tweeted that the street price will be $8400 in the US but the price will fluctuate regionally. While this may sound high, it is far cheaper than the first iteration of surface which hit the cash register at $12500."