TechSpot: Check if someone is using your WiFi

There are many reasons why you'd want to check if an unauthorized party is using your wireless network. It may be that you're experiencing a slow Internet connection or you simply don't want anyone getting a free ride while you pay the bill. Of course, there are also security implications if this person can somehow access files on your network, and even legal implications if he uses your connection for piracy or other illicit activities.

Whatever the case it's better to stay on the safe side. Many of you may have already taken some basic precautions when setting up your wireless network and know your way around troubleshooting these issues.

This brief guide is aimed at novice users in need a hand to find out if their Wi-Fi is being stolen. We've also thrown in a couple of suggestions on how to get something in return if you don't actually mind sharing your Wi-Fi.

Read: Check if someone is using your Wi-Fi

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14 Comments

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why all this work..... the router comes with its support software. you can leave open and unsecured for all i care as long as i have mac adress filtering

this kinda info is not needed...what is needed is a how-to secure your network document. WPA/WPA2 and you're set. Nobody using your wireless.

Noobs and their WEP.

SirEvan said,
this kinda info is not needed...what is needed is a how-to secure your network document. WPA/WPA2 and you're set. Nobody using your wireless.

Noobs and their WEP.

Of course it's needed. Here in Canada, most of the wifis access points are actually modem/router combo units from your ISP.

Most average users don't know anything beyond their ISPs support number.

Education is always the key, and a wireless security article targeted toward the less than savvy computer user is just fine.

Put together your WPA/WPA2 document and submit it here or to TS.


However, I disagree with the Ts article about 'getting something' for the people accessing your network.
My ISPs terms of service specifically state that I am not to be profiting by re-selling the connection I buy from them. Check the terms of service with your ISP to find out for sure before trying to profit from the people trying to steal your wifis

For a novice this would be excellent and informative.

Surely this would be in the destructions? Not that I ever read them anyway

You don't need a guide, just run Nir Sofer's free portable : Wireless Network Watcher v1.00


Wireless Network Watcher is a small utility that scans your
wireless network and displays the list of all computers and
devices that are currently connected to your network.
For every computer or device that is connected to your
network, the following information is displayed: IP address,
MAC address, the company that manufactured the network card,
and optionally the computer name

http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/wireless_network_watcher.html

alexalex said,
You don't need a guide, just run Nir Sofer's free portable : Wireless Network Watcher v1.00


Wireless Network Watcher is a small utility that scans your
wireless network and displays the list of all computers and
devices that are currently connected to your network.
For every computer or device that is connected to your
network, the following information is displayed: IP address,
MAC address, the company that manufactured the network card,
and optionally the computer name

http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/wireless_network_watcher.html

I didn't realise a guide was even needed (assuming you know your router password).

1) Open Web Browser
2) 192.168.0.1 (or other router IP)
3) Check the connected devices list
4) Profit!

Majesticmerc said,

I didn't realise a guide was even needed (assuming you know your router password).

1) Open Web Browser
2) 192.168.0.1 (or other router IP)
3) Check the connected devices list
4) Profit!

I dont mean this as rude, but the post said its for novice users. The average novice user doesnt even know that the router has a password much less a way to see things. In addition using your own steps here are the questions a noob would ask

1) Open Web Browser = Is that the Big E on my background screen / boot screen
2 ) 192.168.0.1 = Where do I type that? Followed by whats an address bar?
3) Check the connection list = (scratch head thinking what do you look at?)

So your suggestion to a novice is asking for a miricle.

Majesticmerc said,

I didn't realise a guide was even needed (assuming you know your router password).

1) Open Web Browser
2) 192.168.0.1 (or other router IP)
3) Check the connected devices list
4) Profit!

Congratulations, you some how managed to troll with the post the exact same thing (just 99% less informative) as the artical on techspot... you didn't read.

3. btw doesn't work if the unwanted person has cloned a mac address of a known client on the network. As far as your router cares, its the same machine, but as others have said already. For a notice the techspot page is a pretty good way to get to grips with their network in the first instance.

What in the world makes you guys think that mentioned novices would (a) know what a Techspot is, and (b) be able to follow the instruction?. Granted, it goes into more detail than I did, but still, if they didn't follow my instructions, they certainly won't follow an article that uses words like "Gateway" and "TCP/IP".