TechSpot: HTML 5 Gaming Showcase, Old Classics and Modern Titles You Can Play for Free

A lot has changed since the days when web developers relied almost exclusively on Flash for media-rich interactive content. Although the technology is still very much alive and may not see a replacement anytime soon for certain uses, more and more websites are implementing HTML5 for streaming audio and video, and we are also starting to see some applications in the gaming space.

HTML is a markup language for structuring and presenting content on the web. Its latest and still-in-development incarnation adds a variety of elements and attributes that make it easier to include and handle multimedia and graphical content on the web without having to resort to proprietary plugins.

On the gaming side, there are some really impressive examples that could easily rival some of the stuff that has been done on Flash over the past decade. We've compiled a small selection of old classics and modern titles built with HTML5 and other open web standards that will give you a taste of things to come.

Read: HTML 5 Gaming Showcase: Old Classics and Modern Games You Can Play for Free

These articles are brought to you in partnership with TechSpot.

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Yep.. it's great but that's all at the level of 10 years ago. It's nice to see it progressing but the problem is that these games simply don't run the same or without issues across platforms and browsers.

Compare that to latest Flash games (including the super awesome version of Angry Birds on Facebook, Age of Defenders, Unreal Tournament 3 and many others) and you see how far Flash is compared to HTML5. Stage3D and Flash 11.x just rock people's socks off at performance and fluidity of gameplay and now with Unity3D exporting to Flash we will see some truly breathtaking games in the browser that work in any browser.

Most of the games in HTML5 are fairly simple and interestingly enough, due to HTML5 shortcomings with audio (and number of channels and so on) Angry Birds version on Chrome Store is still using Flash for some audio stuff.

Boz said,
Yep.. it's great but that's all at the level of 10 years ago. It's nice to see it progressing but the problem is that these games simply don't run the same or without issues across platforms and browsers.

I guess that explains why HTML5 is still in development...?

Boz said,
Yep.. it's great but that's all at the level of 10 years ago. It's nice to see it progressing but the problem is that these games simply don't run the same or without issues across platforms and browsers.

Compare that to latest Flash games (including the super awesome version of Angry Birds on Facebook, Age of Defenders, Unreal Tournament 3 and many others) and you see how far Flash is compared to HTML5. Stage3D and Flash 11.x just rock people's socks off at performance and fluidity of gameplay and now with Unity3D exporting to Flash we will see some truly breathtaking games in the browser that work in any browser.

Most of the games in HTML5 are fairly simple and interestingly enough, due to HTML5 shortcomings with audio (and number of channels and so on) Angry Birds version on Chrome Store is still using Flash for some audio stuff.

The HTML5 version of those games run as fast and looks as nice on flash...

Breakthrough said,
I guess that explains why HTML5 is still in development...?

No need to bold it. Here's a thought: technology is supposed to be advancing. HTML5, however, is a step backwards in every aspect except arguably its openness. Many steps in some cases. 10 years ago I'd probably have welcomed it. We need it ready here and now, period.

Xerax said,
The HTML5 version of those games run as fast and looks as nice on flash...

Why don't you actually read Boz's post...
Keyphrase: issues across platforms and browsers. IE8, for instance.

cralias said,

No need to bold it. Here's a thought: technology is supposed to be advancing. HTML5, however, is a step backwards in every aspect except arguably its openness. Many steps in some cases. 10 years ago I'd probably have welcomed it. We need it ready here and now, period.


Why don't you actually read Boz's post...
Keyphrase: issues across platforms and browsers. IE8, for instance.

Why would HTML5 be a step backwards? It's standardising web development and making it easier to deliver new technologies to websites.

SPARTdAN said,

Why would HTML5 be a step backwards? It's standardising web development and making it easier to deliver new technologies to websites.

There have already been enough such standartization attempts. At least number 5 should tell you how much. Not only they've failed as such but they aren't enforcable. What's worse, HTML5 actually names unenforcability as an advantage. Tell me, please, what good is any "standard" (quotes intended) if one can't apply it to officially certify products and services (akin to ISO, for example) as a definite sign of quality and warranty and universally attribute to those who fail an audit and others who don't even bother the lack of it? Software is always delivered to the end user with the infamous "as is" and "not guaranteed to be fit for a particular purpose" clause, despite the advertising absolutely contradicting that claim in most cases. I want similar rules for all products and services, software included.

And another thing. I can't stress it enough that it's very late. It'd be naive of me to want it having occured when interwebs was in its infancy. Instead one would have hoped it coming around the dot-com boom, around 2000, when rich internet applications were just starting to appear, in anticipation of what's to come given the ever increasing pace of technology growth and capabilities of consumer machines (a fact which has been continuously ignored in pretty much every area, I might add). What we got instead was the smelly web-two, a collection of vague guidelines "more animations, more reflections of logos like they were on a spit-shiny floors", mostly kitsch.
And what technologies exactly are we talking about? Making flow layout a legacy and moving to a resolution independent XYZ, given the increasing graphical capabilites and requirements? Multi-thread scaling, essential and obvious requirement well ago, but even more now when mobile devices soon will have more cores than an average Joe's desktop. 3D, which is such a fad now? Native data processing (on GPUs perhaps) coupled with an increased security so malware can't exploit these capabilities at all? Increased security in general (for example, disallowing plaintext passwords and requiring a certain amount of entropy as well)? No, nothing of that, just some more Javascript librette, Canvas element and CSS that now makes spaghetti. HTML5 is this same web-two, web-three, web-five. It brings no technological advancement, only more cute UI niceties which always result in platform and browser incompatibilities. Especially in terms of audio/video codecs where "openness" has totally f*cked things up - oldfags happily support proprietary things like they'd always done, newfags, openfags and freetards take a standard and bastardize it with their own ideas. What's left of a standard if nobody gives a flying fly about supporting it fully in their products and services?
Instead, everyone still does things at their own pace and on their own. What has been standartized so far is slapping an HTML5 badge on it and selling this snakeoil, despite a possibility to classify it as false advertising.
Lastly, it's still in development. For how long still? Okay, you overslept a decade, then hurry the f* up now! It's already rolling like a snowball downhill!

Only thing it does - makes jobs. It's always a good thing. And that's it.

Thanks for reading (or tl;dr-ing - it does for me because after many such ramblings I don't expect fanbois that overjoyedly squak whenever they're fed a new thing by their masters to bother).