TechSpot: Nvidia GeForce GTX 750 Ti vs. AMD Radeon R7 265

Marking the introduction of its Maxwell architecture, Nvidia has targeted AMD's $150 Radeon R7 265 with the new GeForce GTX 750 Ti, a card that promises to be more than another rebadge. The GTX 750 Ti's GM107 is meant to make Nvidia's 28nm design process as efficient as possible by splitting Kepler's 192-core streaming multiprocessor into four blocks with each block featuring its own control logic.

With fewer cores being used to get more performance, Maxwell consumes less power and improves Kepler's performance per watt. Maxwell brings other improvements as well, but that boost alone suggests that AMD's Radeon R7 265 could be in trouble at today's pricing considering it's essentially a slightly overclocked and steeply discounted HD 7850.

However, we can't forget that it hasn't even been two years since the HD 7850 was the best mainstream value going, so we have high hopes for the R7 265 at its reduced price point.

Read: Nvidia GeForce GTX 750 Ti vs. AMD Radeon R7 265
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20 Comments

I hate this stupid mining thing. People who actually want the cards for gaming are getting screwed because the prices are all completely insane due to "miners" are buying up all the cards.

dr_crabman said,
It's not even cost effective anymore. Let's hope the bubble burst sooner than later.

It's not even cost effective anymore? The very reason Radeon GPU prices are so high lately is because it is VERY cost effective. Sorry, but I can't help but detect what might be some jealousy causing this type of complaint.

Thrackerzod said,
I hate this stupid mining thing. People who actually want the cards for gaming are getting screwed because the prices are all completely insane due to "miners" are buying up all the cards.

Supply and demand. Ultimately this is good for AMD/Radeon and gamers alike; AMD has been somewhat struggling lately, and this new emergence in the market will encourage them to continue working on more powerful GPUs rather than focusing all their efforts on unproven APUs.

Caleo said,

It's not even cost effective anymore? The very reason Radeon GPU prices are so high lately is because it is VERY cost effective. Sorry, but I can't help but detect what might be some jealousy causing this type of complaint.

so $0.5/day is cost effective for you? u will need to mine coins for 2 years to start gaining someprofit, and by then this card is going to be obsolete xD

Litecoin is something different. Many 290X owners who have bought 4 already paid for the electricity and system after only 1 month!

So yes $1600 a month for such a system is a nice continual investment that will only go up as the value increases. However this one wont have that kind of power as 4 of the 290x though LOL. But maybe an option if you do not have cash and want to make some extra income

WinRT said,

so $0.5/day is cost effective for you? u will need to mine coins for 2 years to start gaining someprofit, and by then this card is going to be obsolete xD

It would help to state which coin you're talking about. GPU mining for bitcoin is a dead end, but you can make over $500 in Litecoin a month with a four GPU system, or over $1000 in dogecoin. There's a guy in my doge pool who makes about $400 a day.

Price/Performance is disappointing. I expected this to replace 650 Ti Boost, which had great value, but it wasn't meant to be.

With a G-Sync capable monitor, the GTX 750 Ti will actually provide the smoother experience, especially in framerates between 30 and 60. For everyone else, though, the AMD card is the better buy, assuming it'll be available at these prices.

Do you think it's worth the extra money to buy a G-Sync capable monitor? Personally, I always turn on vsync and I don't notice any input lag or stutter.

G-Sync is a huge win at any framerate between 30 and 60 (assuming your monitor is 60hz). Without it, 45fps feels like a jerkier 30fps - it's actually a worse experience than stable 30fps. If you usually keep your framerate at or above 60, then it has less of an impact, but then again if you had G-Sync you could increase your graphical options and dive below 60fps without much impact to the fluidity. 60fps stops being that magical framerate you need for fluid gameplay.

I think basically every monitor should ship with that or some equivalent technology, including HDTVs, within a few years (yes I'm wildly optimistic).

I bought a 120hz Lightboost monitor before G-Sync was in the talks, so when I can't achieve 120fps, I just disable V-Sync, as tearing is less of an issue at 120hz; I'd certainly prefer G-Sync though.

I find it strange that on Crysis 3 it represents such low FPS. I have the mobile SLI variant (2 GT 750m) and I can throw 27~ as average @ 1080p with the settings it says.

Could it be unreleased drivers? Could it be that the settings on the page aren't the ones tested? Because no way in heaven that the mobile variant is as fast as its desktop counterpart, even in SLI.

(Edit: This isn't for show-up purposes)

This got me at $150 and I instantly though 'Great, time to update the 9600GT!'.
Then I looked at the overseas tax, prices start from £130, and I've suddenly lost interest again.

I have to admit, this is a pretty impressive offering from Nvidia in terms of gpu efficiency. Tests roughly 15-30% better framerates across most games than the 650Ti, and uses about 10% less power in the process.

Now, the price point isn't exactly flawless (seeing as I bought a 7870 for about $200 ~1.5 years ago which has a pretty good leg up performance wise), but with cryptocurrency miners driving prices up, it's not at all a bad offering for the low-midrange segment.

The R7 265 is a better buy if it's sold at $150 USD. With that said, the GTX 750 Ti is still an impressive video card. It plays Titanfall (at 1080p) better than the Xbox One.

It's a great video card even though the R7 265 is better, assuming it's priced at $150 USD. I think both cards will go up in price simply because of cryptocurrency miners. It's a new market for NVIDIA and AMD so you can expect them to try to make money there. It's both bad and good. Good in that it's a new source of profit for both companies but bad because it means higher prices for consumers and less supply.

I've noticed that prices for AMD video cards are still going up. When I wanted to buy my R9 270X, it was available for $209.99 CAD. When I bought it at the end of January, I paid $249.99. Now it's approaching $279.99.

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