TechSpot PC Buying Guide: Mid-2014 Update

TechSpot's PC Buying Guide offers an in-depth list of today's best desktop PC hardware, spanning four typical budgets starting at ~$500 for a well-balanced machine capable of medium workloads, up to $3,000+ for the Luxury build which includes the best PC hardware recommendations when budget is not a big concern. In-between, you will find two mainstream systems that are good for heavy-multitasking and depending on your choice of GPU casual to high-end gaming.

• Decent performance • Good for everyday computing • Gaming with add-on GPU
• Good performance • Fast for everyday computing • Casual gaming
• Excellent performance • Great Multitasker • Perfect for gaming
• Workstation-like performance • Heavy multitasking • Extreme gaming
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They include sound cards.

They include needlessly expensive motherboards and then pair them with a budget 212 cooler. It's a good cooler, it's not good with heavy overclocking.

There are so many issues with these builds.

derekaw said,
Mac sales are up. Take a look at a Mac, you wont regret it.

See the World, they said, it will be funny, they said.

Anyways, for a professional in the vfx industry, Mac is a no-go, most companies are abandoning OSX completely or delegating as a second or third position (after Windows and Linux in some cases).

Well, I have the i7-4790K, but I need a newer PSU before I can upgrade my graphics card. I'd love a 770, but a 760 would suit me just fine.

Anyone have one up for sell? :)

dead.cell said,
Well, I have the i7-4790K, but I need a newer PSU before I can upgrade my graphics card. I'd love a 770, but a 760 would suit me just fine.

Anyone have one up for sell? :)

depends what PSU youve got if its like 600watt its fine... ive seen some steam machines with a 550watt PSU with i7 and 780 in it

I have a 600W already, but the problem is that it wasn't designed for the modern day, and lacks more than one 3-set SATA connectors and 8-pin / 6-pin connectors. I believe the 760 either uses 8+8 or 8+6, depending on the brand. I've already got an adapter to get the 8-pin on my mobo. :pinch:

dead.cell said,
I have a 600W already, but the problem is that it wasn't designed for the modern day, and lacks more than one 3-set SATA connectors and 8-pin / 6-pin connectors. I believe the 760 either uses 8+8 or 8+6, depending on the brand. I've already got an adapter to get the 8-pin on my mobo. :pinch:

if its modular you can buy em or you can buy molex to 8/6 pin connectors

Neither do I, but I likely have a different pet peeve. See, the article mentions:

Our Core i7-3960X Extreme Edition/GTX 780-packing test machine only consumed 333 watts at full load.

... and then proceeds straight with telling to get 600-700 and *godhellgasp* kilowatt units. Nobody ever upgrades that much, it harms efficiency by percent (several on 120V) and it does not enhance their longevity at all.