Editorial

The current drawbacks of Xbox One

Microsoft’s recently released Xbox One has a lot of benefits. It’s a good console (read Neowin’s review here), and it has the potential to be great. But for all the benefits it offers, there are still some glaring issues.

Both Microsoft and Sony are believed to have rushed their consoles to the market in an effort to make the busy holiday shopping season. And while rushed doesn’t necessarily mean deficient, it does mean there are some corners that were cut.

Luckily for Microsoft, all the major issues with the console are fixable; in fact, most could probably be fixed by the time the first major updates comes out for the console, which should be released in the coming months. Right now, however, the drawbacks prevent the console from being a “must-buy” device, though it’s still an easy recommendation for those who can afford it – just not everyone else yet.

Poor store layout

Much like Windows 8’s store before it, the Xbox One store needs a lot of improvement.

Right now, games are sorted in a few ways: by popularity, rating, selling, and if they’re new or featured. That’s not much of a problem at the moment given the limited amount of games available, but down the line it will only lead to headaches. But even now, just a few weeks after the console was released, the game store is already a mess.

Currently, finding game content is an unnecessary burden on users. Instead of actually being listed alongside the full game in the store, demos and add-ons are nowhere to be seen in the aforementioned sections. Instead, users have to search for the other content; it’s not listed in the same area as the full game. The Xbox 360’s games store, by comparison, featured demos and DLC's listed alongside all other content for a game. The app store currently features the same layout as well.

This may seem like a minor gripe at first blush, but it loses the sense of discovery Xbox 360 users have become accustomed to.

For Xbox Live Arcade demos on the Xbox 360, there were always trial versions as well. Since all games are now simply considered Xbox One games, with no subsection of type (such as full games, arcade games and indie games, as found on the Xbox 360), it likely means they’re all subject to the same standards. If that means smaller, XBLA-sized games don’t have demos or trials displayed alongside the full game in the store, it's going to prove to be a major headache for independent and small developers.

Odd interface quirks

While the Metro interface of the Xbox One can be a major asset, there are several ways it doesn’t live up to its predecessor’s version of the interface.

On the Xbox 360, a guide menu can be called up with the press of a button to quickly view certain frequent tasks, such as messages or achievements. Now, users are thrown back into the home screen and forced to select separate apps for those tasks – and, if apps aren’t pinned, users will have to launch the app that lists all installed games and apps. That’s part of the issue of Xbox One making almost every task an app – it requires far more button presses, and it can also make navigating back to the place you started a pain.

If you want to see what achievements you have remaining in a game, for instance, you have to exit the game and load the achievements app, seen above. By comparison, the Xbox 360 allowed you to pull up a list of achievements while in a game to view them – and the important information was much quicker to navigate, with descriptions appearing in the same window instead of separate windows for each achievement.

The use of app snapping somewhat aids in the change, but many apps don’t have snapping features – or they have poor versions at the moment.

Regardless of how Microsoft fixes it, it’s something that needs to be addressed. The unnecessary complexity of the interface is a clear step backwards. Instead of easily navigating through frequent activities, there are more button presses and a variety of different hoops to jump through to get to where you want to go.

Lack of proper storage management

You’re holding it wrong. It’s not a bug, it’s a feature. And now: Storage is automatic, and users don’t need to worry about it.

Companies often get creative with excuses when there are clear issues with a product, but there is no excuse for lacking proper storage management on a device that could quickly have its storage filled to capacity. Microsoft claims that “storage is automatic” thanks to the cloud, meaning a user’s console likely knows it can delete locally saved data when a game is uninstalled, and that data will still be available on the cloud.

That’s a great capability, but it only takes care of some of the smallest file sizes. Users who may have several games installed but aren’t sure what they want to remove will have to research the file sizes of each game instead of simply pulling up a storage menu to see that information in one place. It’s not an elegant solution, and it doesn’t make storage management problems go away – it just makes them worse. Additionally, DLC doesn’t appear to have any management options; so if a user downloads a DLC pack that’s no longer necessary, he or she may simply be stuck with it until the game is uninstalled.

By comparison, the Xbox 360’s storage options were easily found in the settings area, seen above. In other words, yet again there’s another significant interface element that’s a major step back from the previous generation, and this one has more ramifications for users.

Microsoft’s storage management decisions appear to impact other aspects of the console as well. Xbox Video purchases can’t be downloaded to the console, likely a remnant of the previously always-online requirement. This may help save space, but a better option would be allowing visible storage – that way those with slow internet connections can purchases or rent HD videos without worry.

Extreme slowdowns

When the Xbox 360 launched, its dashboard “blades” interface lacked many features, but it offset that by being extremely fast. The Xbox One home screen has the opposite problem: There are times when the full-featured interface can be absurdly slow.

It appears that when the “instant on” mode is enabled, it’s easy for the Xbox One interface to gradually slow down over time, as a result of instances such as games crashing. “Battlefield 4,” for example, has crashing problems on all consoles it’s available on; on the Xbox One, however, the constant crashes eventually leads to the interface becoming painfully slow.

The slowdown impacts the home screen, app switching and general performance. “Battlefield 4” crashing is clearly the fault of DICE and EA, but the crashing slowing down the Xbox One interface is Microsoft’s responsibility.

While the Xbox 360’s dashboard was occasionally sluggish when fetching Internet-based data, the Xbox One’s home screen doesn’t appear to rely on much Internet-based data. In other words, the current errors are likely programming-based, meaning they should be fixable in time.

Kinect usefulness limited

Microsoft made a big deal about the importance of the next-generation Kinect sensor that comes bundled with each Xbox One. The sensor is a big part of the console’s ecosystem, Microsoft officials have said, and there are no plans to offer a version without Kinect.

There’s some truth to the statements that Kinect is important to the console, as it powers many of the TV capabilities of the console as well as some of its more unique features, such as instant user recognition and controller switching. Yet Xbox One’s TV capabilities are primarily for U.S. users at the moment, and the $100 cost increase over Sony’s PlayStation 4 is hardly worth it for the console’s more unique navigation and recognition features alone.

If that weren’t bad enough, Xbox One launched with few games that required Kinect or made significant use of the sensor. The planned launch of “Kinect Sports Rivals” was delayed to 2014, and no third-party developers or publishers have announced games that make significant use of the sensor. That’s embarrassing, to be blunt.

[Correction: As pointed out by users below, the fitness games "Kinect Fitness," "Zumba World Party" and "Just Dance 2014" require the Kinect sensor, and the "D4" mystery game scheduled for 2014 will use it as well.]

Microsoft made big promises for the first-generation Kinect sensor, and it didn’t deliver. There were some extremely fun games, such as the first two Kinect Sports games, “Kinect Adventures” and “The Gunstringer.” But Microsoft slowly moved away from the sensor, with fewer and fewer games being released for it.

Yes, some games offer additional capabilities thanks to Kinect, but most are poorly implemented and add almost nothing to enhance gameplay. If Microsoft wants Kinect to be a vital part of Xbox One, it needs to show why. Since the console doesn’t have TV integration in most markets yet, there will likely be many unhappy they had to pay $100 more than a PlayStation 4, primarily because of Kinect.

Images via Microsoft

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That's my biggest gripe since getting my One, the storage management option. I always like to go into the storage options on my 360 to see just how much a game and its DLC is taking up, now I can't, and it's annoying.

Startup time is another for me. Unless you use the quick sleep mode, startup time is so much longer than the 360, when I got my One, and had completed the initial setup, I switched it off and on again, and was actually WORRIED when it took so long to start the OS, I thought the console had developed a problem, so put the quick sleep option on. It seems weird when Windows 8 on my quad core laptop starts quicker, even booting a VM as it starts it's faster than the One on cold start.

I love how I can quickly dash out of Forza 5 into Skydrive, for example, while in the middle of the race, then go straight back in as if nothing happened. I always wished the 360 could have done that! The Xbox One is the first console where I've been an early adopter, I sold some shares which I'd made profit on for my new toy, so it hasn't really cost me anything, I thought, "Why not?".

I trust Microsoft by now, I've had all their consoles and always had good service from them, electrically and in terms of their customer support. They've helped so much in my IT repair business, being second to none when a customer has had product key issues. Obviously it's early, I'm actually quite excited to see how the One evolves!

I'm having so much fun on Forza 5 it has all been worth it. With all assists off, on a 60" plasma it is sooo realistic I feel like I'm driving a real car, and can feel wheel lock and skid through the triggers! Forza 1, 2, 3, 4 and Horizon have nothing on this, and I've played em all! Add me on Live, gamertag AngelTiddles, let's race together, see if I can beat your Drivatar!

for me it's mostly... price and lack of games for the most part. it's hard to justify spending $500 for a system nowadays especially given that the vast majority of games ain't even worth playing anymore.

I agree with most. I think overall the whole OS is definitively rushed and the UI clearly beta. However it is kind of pointless to worry about this given how much the Xbox360 evolved over time, therefore the xbox 1 current UI is as primitive to what we will have as the blades once were for the 360.

as for Kinect, I think it is great but definitively needs to be tweaked to respond to commands without the need to say xbox when you just said xbox 4 seconds ago.

Optical output only supporting Stereo sound now at launch was a bit of a disappointment. I also wish there would be some clear indicator that Kinect is working, now it's kind of a guesswork as it suddenly just stops working and there's no way to "wave" in order to wake it.

I totally disagree about the Kinect part of this article. I use the Kinect constantly...just not the motion sensing part of it. Being able to say "Xbox, on" and have my Xbox One, TV, surround receiver, and cable box all come to life is pure magic. I use it to go to TV ("Xbox, watch TV"), change channels, ("Xbox, watch ESPN"), or to load up a game ("Xbox, go to Battlefield 4"). I use it to make a Skype call ("Xbox, call Taylor"), or to ask for a medic in BF4 (just say "need medic"), and to record an awesome moment with "Xbox, record that!"

The other points are fair. However, in my experience, although there are slowdowns in the home screen UI, they are usually only short-lived stutters that go away after a few seconds. I'm sure these will be cleared up before long.

I still think the biggest issue the dashboard is facing is the "app driven" model that Microsoft created where everything is its own app. Friends is an app, achievements is an app, party is an app, etc. It leads to having to jump out of whatever experience I'm currently in to do the simplest things.

Using the guide on 360 while in the game allowed me to manage a party, send messages, invite friends, look at achievements, etc, all while I was still in the game from one simple menu. Now I need to leave the game, navigate to each app individually (and wait for each to load showing its own useless splash screen) to do anything. It rips me out of the experience and really makes the whole thing feel fractured. It shouldn't take 2-3X as long to do the same tasks as before. That's unacceptable.

On Xbox 360, to view my current achievements, I hit the guide button, scroll over a couple panes and hit A on achievements. Done. To get back into the game, I just hit guide again and I'm right back.

On Xbox One, I hit Home, select my "Friends" app, wait for that to load, select "Achievements", wait for that to load, then scroll over and finally select the game I'm on. To get back I either need to find the "Play" button on the game's achievements screen or hit "home" and find the game in my recent list at the bottom. Its a disaster.

Its even more exaggerated when all the apps try and feel the same, but still seem like they were created by totally different groups. Why is the achievements background black, but the friends feed is bright white? Why can the party app only be snapped?

If anything I'd love to have a bit of the old guide back. Press the Home button and the mini-guide pops up with links to important things for in game. Achievements, Friends, Party, etc. Selecting any of those opens the app windowed right there with the game in the background or runs a simplified version of the main app right in the guide. If you double tap the Home button, it takes you to the home screen like it does now. Simple.

You're not leaving the game. You're just switching to another screen and can flip back where you were. Does it make that much of a difference to see the game background on the borders? The advantages to this are huge because it's no longer limited to those few integrated items. Now any app can be loaded and accessed during the game. The snap thing is up to the app to support. Some things just can't be easily crammed into that form factor.

The game is an app. I'm leaving that app to open another app. Hence I'm leaving the game.

It actually does make a huge deal when it comes to a user's perception of where they are in the UI flow. It feels very jarring to just want to check an achievement or view a friend and suddenly you are thrown into other apps that make it seem like the game goes away. Especially when it can be a huge pain to navigate back to the game. Its not just "push the guide button again" and your back, now you have to go through home again and "relaunch" the game by clicking the disc drive tile or the "recent places" tile.

I'm totally for the multitasking this allows - being able to pause my game and go watch tv or something for a bit is awesome. However, I shouldn't have to go through such an annoying process to just check something quickly that relates to the game. I really think we need a quicker way to interact while remaining in the game for simple tasks, which is exactly what the guide gave us.

Perhaps you should have waited before buying. That way you could have saved yourself some time and headache for having to dealing with this expensive pain in the ass of a console. /s

In all seriousness, reading this article one would think they are reviewing a console that's been out for a while. This thing hasn't been out for a month yet. Is this the public needs to know information or some closet bashing? You make the call. I have my opinion.

I would love to see an article on a product like the when it is written by someone that actually had high level knowledge in the field. Too bad successful developers, programmers, and hardware makers do also post articles.

Why should the public pay $500+ for a console that was released with so many bugs and unfinished features? If you base your buying decision strictly on marketing from the company, that's fine, but some people like to hear from others what the current issues may be.

Plus this is clearly labeled as an editorial. It's the authors opinion.

As for Kinect games, Xbox Fitness and Just Dance are both really good. The Rival Sports Preview is also good.

I use Bing for everything store related. Xbox Bing Action games, Xbox Bing Racing games, Xbox Bing Game Demos, Xbox Bing New Games etc. Works awesome, the best way to navigate a store on maybe any device ever.

I agree with the points made in this article for the most part (though I expect them to be polished and resolved promptly)...

A couple of things though...

First, crashes in a game should not be able to impact the OS... This is just unacceptable. I have not witnessed this myself, but I hope, if true, this gets fixed.

Second, the Dashboard seems to rely on the internet quite a bit, so I have to disagree with that point of the article.

Third, there should be demos of every game... Not none... I figured at this point with a console pushing digital, that would have been a no brainer...

M_Lyons10 said,
First, crashes in a game should not be able to impact the OS... This is just unacceptable. I have not witnessed this myself, but I hope, if true, this gets fixed...

A crash is a crash, is the game not running within the OS?

I haven't seen anything take down the OS yet. I've have had Assassin's Creed crash several times, and I can go back to the dashboard, restart it, and continue. Applications can use up all the CPU or memory and slow everything else down.

Nothing using Kinect? Eh? Did Xbox Fitness, Just Dance 4, and Zoomba World Party not launch with the console?

No third party announcements? Did Harmonix not announce Fantasia? Did Swery not announce D4?

NerdyTech said,
microsoft-to-sell-surface-2-bundle-for-99-pro-2-bundle-for-199-on-dec-14

Was wondering the same. Went to link a friend to it to see if he could pick it up for me out of state (don't live near a store location). Maybe it was found to be false information.

Agreed. As much as I would like to have one, I know I would be impatient and frustrated at the teething problems. In the meantime I will enjoy some fabulous deals for the XBOX360 (GoW is free!)

efjay said,
Typical Microsoft. Glad I'm not being charged $500 to be a beta tester.

The store issue with addons is more just an issue in Microsoft changing Start to Menu and not explaining it. Hit Menu on a game, and then you can go to the add-ons. It's not hard, it's just not explained well.

Sicarius123 said,
The store issue with addons is more just an issue in Microsoft changing Start to Menu and not explaining it. Hit Menu on a game, and then you can go to the add-ons. It's not hard, it's just not explained well.

Agreed. I think few existing console users will think to press "Start" (the center button on the right, which has always been about starting and pausing games) in some of the new situations where it has new contextual function (e.g. when selecting different tiles on the start screen. There is no game to pause.)

Spicoli said,
I think people just didn't look at the instructions. It's the second item on the "3 new buttons" tutorial video and shows exactly how it works.

Really it's now the Xbox version of a right click or long press.

As all the issues are software related, fixing them shouldn't be an issue (as stated in the Editorial), so this is simply a case of making the holiday sales while owners experience will continue to improve over the consoles lifetime.

The way I see it is, having the console with some shortcomings is better then not having the console and waiting for the experience to be polished more - especially when you consider that polish will speedup with feedback from millions of owners.

to view frequent task, why not use pin apps or use the voice Command? Can you find any thing that is more useful than kinect from Sony or Nintendo? I use my Kinect a lot, to go to Setting launch games launch apps shut down and turn on the System check achievement check friends use it in battlefield fifa etc. How is that not being useful? We are not talking about Skype and the TV feature...

Do you think every thing will Come at once for a system they build from ground up? it takes time for the Xbox 360 to get to where it is today.

My favorite is say "xbox bing" and then the name of the show. It shows me which streaming services it's on and if it's part of the unlimited streaming subscription or a buy/rent PPV item. It sure beats going to each one to find stuff.

Too bad it can't search your TV listings, DVR, and DLNA storage, it's just trying to promote paid services. I was hoping it would be more of a universal search like spotlight or something.

Good little article. I agree with the short-comings mentioned. Although my games look wonderful, I can't help but miss my Xbox 360. I have until January to return my Xbox One with the extended holiday return policy. I would recommend folks enjoying their 360, to keep on enjoying it and wait for some improvements from Microsoft.

dead.cell said,
Agreed. I said screw the "next generation", which is still behind anyway, and grabbed a $199 PS3 with two games.
That's not a bad idea. Something I'm really considering. I'm hoping next year around this time, most of the annoyances will be fixed with the Xbox One.

Tha Bloo Monkee said,
You mean Kinect was just a gimmick? Whodathunkit!?

I actually don't think it was a gimmick, I just think Microsoft planned support for the sensor poorly. Non-U.S. users will essentially use it for instant recognition and voice navigation. They probably won't use it for almost anything else.

Microsoft made a big deal about how the new Kinect is essentially lag free, if there are no games for it, who cares?

HUH???

BF4,dr3,forza 5, crimson dragon, fighter within, Kinect sports rivals demo,xbox fitness,just dance 2014 all have some form of Kinect motion tracking support. other games like KI also handle multi player settings loading using Kinect.

So did they completely remove kinect controls from Ryse and Crimson Dragon? I was under the impression that controller support was an addition, and that even though it may be the default method, motion controls would at least remain an alternative. They just threw all that away?

Worst mobile site ever. What the blood clot were they thinking?

lol holding your finger to your temple to activate powers? That's the kind of creative stuff I like. I don't know if I'd actually want to do it, but it's an interesting use. So ryse has nothing left of the original control scheme?

Skin said,
This story/editorial is just poor all around.

How can you be negative without giving some constructive criticism?

Actually, got busy and really wasn't looking to elaborate on what looks to be a bashing fluff piece, but some over all first thoughts...

Dashboard.. well, I haven't seen a glut of posts or anger about the slow dashboard from most users, but does it occasionally get slow while loading something, or playing a memory intensive game? at times, but is that a drawback? Especially since the PS4 also has some 'slowdown' at times...and it really isn't a draw back as the 360 even is slow on some screen transitions. oh, also, it mentions it's over time, but then suggests that the BF4 constant crashes causes the dashboard to slow down quicker... then plays it off to be that MS still owns the dashboard part. meh. It just seems like a nice way to dig MS, while playing off possible real issues and interactions. BF4 is crap coded, even the devs know that, but let's leave out the game aspect when talking about the xbox one's alleged drawbacks - as that is software running on the console. Side note: It was seen that the one does have some issues with memory not being reallocated correctly after some games, apps, etc are used. Is this an OS issue, or the apps that hold it based on coding when they are turned 'off'? That may want to be looked into, rather than just calling out the console item as a drawback.

Kinect... 'launched with exactly zero games that required Kinect or made significant use of the sensor'... depends on what you mean by significant, also if the focus is only launch games, then why is this even under a list of drawbacks to the console, as the kinect offers things (voice, sensors, etc) and even if not HUGELY used, it is indeed used on the 'launch' games (forza, dr3, AS4, etc etc) and isn't a drawback to the console itself. sheesh.

Storage management itself really isn't much of a drawback to the majority of people based on internet articles and forums so far. Is it nice, yeah, but is it a drawback? Well, maybe for the author looking for buzz. Personally I am of the opinion that MS will offer it once they get the external storage working.

Interface quirks... well, the purpose of the console is to snap and run multiple items, heck, even the loved and talked about 360 guide buttons made you stop a lot of what you were doing to go take care of things... on the one, yeah, you have to start the apps, but once you do, it is pretty much seamless in transition. Drawback? not if used correctly.

There is more, but mostly opinion on the piece, which seems really meh overall.

Thanks for the reply, but this is a final part of a two part piece by the same author as noted in the very first paragraph there's also an appriasal piece http://www.neowin.net/news/the-current-benefits-of-xbox-one

Neowin is Microsoft oriented but we also aren't afraid to highlight the shortcomings of whatever it does too, and this is an Editorial as well, so the opinion of the author.

I'll make that clearer in the header of the article

Cool, it's just that in reading, it seemed to come across as another 'bashing' drawbacks for kicks and clicks article. I get it, but honestly felt it was reallllllly searching for things to hit and not bothering to look into the 'issues' more, and focused on a ton on author opinion and anecdotal items, and contained little to no supporting background or evidence.

Well in the case of the UI slowdowns, the reason was given for Battlefield 4 problems? I don't own an Xbox One though, but a reason (or background) was given.

Skin said,
Actually, got busy and really wasn't looking to elaborate on what looks to be a bashing fluff piece, but some over all first thoughts...

Dashboard.. well, I haven't seen a glut of posts or anger about the slow dashboard from most users, but does it occasionally get slow while loading something, or playing a memory intensive game? at times, but is that a drawback? Especially since the PS4 also has some 'slowdown' at times...and it really isn't a draw back as the 360 even is slow on some screen transitions. oh, also, it mentions it's over time, but then suggests that the BF4 constant crashes causes the dashboard to slow down quicker... then plays it off to be that MS still owns the dashboard part. meh. It just seems like a nice way to dig MS, while playing off possible real issues and interactions. BF4 is crap coded, even the devs know that, but let's leave out the game aspect when talking about the xbox one's alleged drawbacks - as that is software running on the console. Side note: It was seen that the one does have some issues with memory not being reallocated correctly after some games, apps, etc are used. Is this an OS issue, or the apps that hold it based on coding when they are turned 'off'? That may want to be looked into, rather than just calling out the console item as a drawback.

Kinect... 'launched with exactly zero games that required Kinect or made significant use of the sensor'... depends on what you mean by significant, also if the focus is only launch games, then why is this even under a list of drawbacks to the console, as the kinect offers things (voice, sensors, etc) and even if not HUGELY used, it is indeed used on the 'launch' games (forza, dr3, AS4, etc etc) and isn't a drawback to the console itself. sheesh.

Storage management itself really isn't much of a drawback to the majority of people based on internet articles and forums so far. Is it nice, yeah, but is it a drawback? Well, maybe for the author looking for buzz. Personally I am of the opinion that MS will offer it once they get the external storage working.

Interface quirks... well, the purpose of the console is to snap and run multiple items, heck, even the loved and talked about 360 guide buttons made you stop a lot of what you were doing to go take care of things... on the one, yeah, you have to start the apps, but once you do, it is pretty much seamless in transition. Drawback? not if used correctly.

There is more, but mostly opinion on the piece, which seems really meh overall.

battle field 4 also Crashes on pc and ps 4. So why is that the Consoles fault? killer instinct has never Crashed on my Console Same with fifA 2014

Skin said,
This story/editorial is just poor all around.

Not at all. Seems spot on after using both ps4 and Xbox one for two weeks now. Ps4 UI rarely slows down. Xbox one does a lot. Though this is due to the suspend feature. Turn off quick booting and restart xbox and it's fine.

The UI itself I hate as it clearly a touchscreen interface butchered for a gamepad. I'm sure it'll get better but right now it's poor.

benjimoola said,

battle field 4 also Crashes on pc and ps 4. So why is that the Consoles fault? killer instinct has never Crashed on my Console Same with fifA 2014

Ugh, this is CLEARLY pointed out in the editorial as well

Still a poor editorial designed to nitpick hot topics and gather clicks and comments. That isn't changed by anything.

If we are going pure editorial, how about in my experience the PS4 slows down MORE than the xbox one. How about the PS4 UI seems old and tired (read: used up and non-innovative) to me, a nightmare of ugg when I try and navigate, yet with both kinect and a gamepad, I can get to where I want to go faster with the one.

Hmm, maybe I should write an editorial.

That just kind of disregards the already pointed out appraisal he wrote as well.. you can go on thinking everything is perfect though. Clearly our author who is an Xbox One owner writing from hands on experience disagrees.

Also, where in the article is this a XB1 v PS4 piece anyway?

Skin said,
Still a poor editorial designed to nitpick hot topics and gather clicks and comments. That isn't changed by anything.

If we are going pure editorial, how about in my experience the PS4 slows down MORE than the xbox one. How about the PS4 UI seems old and tired (read: used up and non-innovative) to me, a nightmare of ugg when I try and navigate, yet with both kinect and a gamepad, I can get to where I want to go faster with the one.

Hmm, maybe I should write an editorial.


Sounds to me like you're just upset that your precious console had some of its negatives pointed out.

Byron_Hinson said,

Not at all. Seems spot on after using both ps4 and Xbox one for two weeks now. Ps4 UI rarely slows down. Xbox one does a lot. Though this is due to the suspend feature. Turn off quick booting and restart xbox and it's fine.

The UI itself I hate as it clearly a touchscreen interface butchered for a gamepad. I'm sure it'll get better but right now it's poor.

The Xbox One UI has been fast and fluid for me. No slowdowns experienced yet. Even with fast booting, and apps left open/cached.

I don't have enough games for storage management to of any concern to me yet. I don't think most people do. So this should be given a little bit of slack, but should be addressed before the library grows considerably.

Tha Bloo Monkee said,

Sounds to me like you're just upset that your precious console had some of its negatives pointed out.

No, it doesn't. It called out poor editorial comments and logic, and really points to the type of comments that they hoped to get by dragging this to the front page.

If this was written the same way about PS4, same rules would apply.

Skin, you do realise that all gamers always find something wrong with consoles and PC games in general right.

Edited by zhangm, Dec 8 2013, 2:11pm :

Snake89 said,
Skin, you do realise that all gamers always find something wrong with consoles and PC games in general right.

Sigh. Did you not read the comment where this goes either way for either console. It isn't just the fact it is X vs. Y, it is the basic way it was written and the fluff opinion that made the editorial up.

So, yeah.

Edited by zhangm, Dec 8 2013, 2:30pm :

Skin said,
This story/editorial is just poor all around.

While I can respect someone disagreeing with me, your comments seem to indicate that having an opinion that differs from yours makes something "poor all around," which is silly. Also, a "fluff" piece and a "bashing" piece are the exact opposite types of articles.

The dashboard slowdown issue happens on several games, "Battlefield 4" is just the most obvious example I could give, hence why I called it an example. It does happen over time, but it can happen in the span of a few hours or a few days -- it's not like it takes a week for the dashboard to slow down. As I specifically stated in the article, yes, other consoles have crashing issues with the game; no, however, other consoles don't slow down as a result of the crashes. That's on Microsoft. The PlayStation 4's slowdowns are nothing like what's happening on Xbox One.

On your Kinect counterpoint, you don't even address the issue, you just get into semantics and say, 'Well, it depends on what you call significant use of Kinect.' The fact is no game requires it, and those that do use it do so in the most basic of ways -- ways that have no substantial gameplay impact. I already laid out the benefits of the sensor in the previous article, which was linked in the very first sentence of this post. But, as I stated, the current benefits are primarily for U.S. users. I'm a U.S. user myself, but how can we just ignore the clear drawbacks that Xbox One owners in the rest of the world are dealing with? It may only be at launch, but beyond "Kinect Sports Rivals," which is listed in the article, there are no major games announced that require Kinect or use it in significant ways.

Skin said,
Still a poor editorial designed to nitpick hot topics and gather clicks and comments. That isn't changed by anything.

If we are going pure editorial, how about in my experience the PS4 slows down MORE than the xbox one. How about the PS4 UI seems old and tired (read: used up and non-innovative) to me, a nightmare of ugg when I try and navigate, yet with both kinect and a gamepad, I can get to where I want to go faster with the one.

Hmm, maybe I should write an editorial.


You're making a lot of assumptions that simply aren't true.

Skin said,

No, it doesn't. It called out poor editorial comments and logic, and really points to the type of comments that they hoped to get by dragging this to the front page.

If this was written the same way about PS4, same rules would apply.


You have yet to illustrate what were poor editorial comments and logic, merely that you disagree with the opinions given in an opinion piece. I wrote about both the benefits and drawbacks of the Xbox One; I'm not going to apologize for writing what I feel are both positives and negatives of the console.

Edited by Anthony Tosie, Dec 8 2013, 3:43pm :

The article is about the XBONE's drawbacks. It says so right there in the title.

I find these articles very useful in determining what I buy. Consider buying a new car and not knowing what parts on it are broken or need fixing - you wouldn't, I hope.

Anthony Tosie said,

snipped from above for length

Honestly, you are playing a lot with words trying to justify why you wrote what I feel to be a poor editorial. It's OK, others CAN disagree with your thoughts, your style, and your life experiences that you write wrapped up in a blanket as fact.

You call out EXTREME slowdowns, which not everyone experiences in the least as a drackback, then suggest that it happens with a lot of games, but worsens in BF4 (I assume that you personally experienced all this, and isn't hearsay) then blame that on the console (when it could well be the coding utilized by the game on the console as I suggested) - evident by the PS4 being slow at times, and also crashing - but from what you say, not as much. Maybe the drawback is point blank, console is new and may crash with use and games - not some drawn out wording with seems to shift blame where you have no idea what is the reason. That was the point.

You call out kinect use (required and 'no substantial gameplay impact') along with a blame of semantics... funny that you argue a slightly different meaning/wording from your initial post to confront that - if you are going to use words and phrases than it is important to relay what you mean the first time. The point stands, not being there (required or significant) in launch games as a drawback... opinion yes, but on a tech website... please.

You then call out store, storage management, UI features as a drawback...etc... if you are going to express opinion, that's fine. I just expressed mine on how your drawbacks and editorial logic arriving at your opinions (1st part aside since that has no reason to be mentioned in comments) smacks of a push for it to be so taken as fact and appears to reach a point where it regurgitates (other random internet) talking points in a grasp at superfluous things to make a 'news' item.

I mean no disrespect, I just think it was poor overall, and really doesn't deserve to be on the front page of a great site like Neowin. Other people will disagree, that's the point of comments.

Skin said,
This story/editorial is just poor all around.

I think the article has some what of a point but I feel its focus is a bit near sighted. I mean while its true that the Kinect sensor is pointless right now the fact that its included guarantees one in every home. This means that a developer can take advantage of this feature and not worry who doesn't have to co aider anyone not having the peripheral. Anyone who has kept up with gaming knows that Additions to consoles doesn't get bought by everyone and you have to consider that when developing the game. What MS did is genius, right now it sucks but think of all the possibilities. Imagine playing a first person shooter and instead of using the dpad or some button combination to bring up the different weapons you can raise your hand grab a grenade and throw it making you feel that you're doing the deed. Or in a RPG certain hand gestures causes a certain magic spell or attack. Its just a matter of time.

Anthony Tosie said,

While I can respect someone disagreeing with me, your comments seem to indicate that having an opinion that differs from yours makes something "poor all around," which is silly. Also, a "fluff" piece and a "bashing" piece are the exact opposite types of articles.

The dashboard slowdown issue happens on several games, "Battlefield 4" is just the most obvious example I could give, hence why I called it an example. It does happen over time, but it can happen in the span of a few hours or a few days -- it's not like it takes a week for the dashboard to slow down. As I specifically stated in the article, yes, other consoles have crashing issues with the game; no, however, other consoles don't slow down as a result of the crashes. That's on Microsoft. The PlayStation 4's slowdowns are nothing like what's happening on Xbox One.

On your Kinect counterpoint, you don't even address the issue, you just get into semantics and say, 'Well, it depends on what you call significant use of Kinect.' The fact is no game requires it, and those that do use it do so in the most basic of ways -- ways that have no substantial gameplay impact. I already laid out the benefits of the sensor in the previous article, which was linked in the very first sentence of this post. But, as I stated, the current benefits are primarily for U.S. users. I'm a U.S. user myself, but how can we just ignore the clear drawbacks that Xbox One owners in the rest of the world are dealing with? It may only be at launch, but beyond "Kinect Sports Rivals," which is listed in the article, there are no major games announced that require Kinect or use it in significant ways.


You're making a lot of assumptions that simply aren't true.


You have yet to illustrate what were poor editorial comments and logic, merely that you disagree with the opinions given in an opinion piece. I wrote about both the benefits and drawbacks of the Xbox One; I'm not going to apologize for writing what I feel are both positives and negatives of the console.


Wow... It seems no 2 Xbox One experiences are the same. Apps or the UI have yet to slow down on me. And this is with fast boot enabled. I have the Day One edition and had it since day one of release.
Now those 2K14 and BF4 servers are ticking me off. I think Azure should of just been mandated. Sure some people would be ticked, but it would be for the greater good.

Good thing, most issues can be resolved with software updates.

It's sad that some feel an author should have to dance around with their words to protect the feelings of a piece of plastic.

dead.cell said,
It's sad that some feel an author should have to dance around with their words to protect the feelings of a piece of plastic.

If the author feels that these are legit issues, that's fine. Especially if Mr. Tosie, is experiencing these issue first hand. I mean this is $500 of his hard earned cash, I'd be ticked too.

I'm more confused than "Justify yourself for this blasphemy" feelings. All these different experiences people are having is off the charts. In one of my forum post I talked about a friend who's Xbox One experience has been anything but good. But me on the other hand have had no issues, and clear sailing with the Apps and UI. My only beef being the actual game servers, and trying to play a game of 2K14 or Battlefield.

These mixed results, to me aren't a good thing, because it makes it harder to pin point a solution for everyone in one shot.
Everyone has the same issue, easier to find out why.