The 'father of SharePoint' is now the head of Microsoft's corporate strategy

Microsoft has been gradually reshuffling its executive team in recent months, following the departure of Steve Ballmer, and the beginning of Satya Nadella’s tenure as the company’s CEO. Some of the big changes include Scott Guthrie’s appointment as Executive Vice President for the Cloud and Enterprise Group, and the return of Stephen Elop to Microsoft, where he is now in charge of its Devices Group.

Bloomberg reports that the latest executive to be reassigned is Jeff Teper who, until recently was the Corporate Vice President for the Office Service and Servers Group. Company spokesperson Peter Wootton confirmed that Teper has been promoted to take charge of Microsoft’s corporate strategy, with a broad remit that will include business areas such as company acquisitions and development.

Teper is sometimes referred to as the ‘father of SharePoint’, as he was one of the foundations ‘knowledge management’ team that later went on to develop and create Microsoft’s business collaboration platform. 

In an interview with GeekWire in 2011, he identified cloud computing as the most important technology of the year, perhaps a prescient statement, given the ‘cloud first, mobile first’ focus that Satya Nadella has established for Microsoft. It’s perhaps no great coincidence that the two share a similar vision, though, given that Teper was part of the team that hired Nadella to work at Microsoft in the first place. 

Nadella said last week that he is "still defining and tuning" Microsoft's long-term strategy, and Teper's appointment will no doubt be instrumental in helping to establish the company's vision and direction for the next decade and beyond. 

Source: Bloomberg | image via Microsoft

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I recently spoke with someone who used to be in the SharePoint product team and he heard 'through the grapevines' at Microsoft TVP that the next version of SharePoint is likely to be the last one available for on-premise customers.

Personally I think this defeats the whole concept of Microsoft providing customers with the choice and the ability to create hybrid clouds (a concept that Microsoft constantly promotes). Moreover not every customer will be willing to move to their documents to the cloud (considering document management) or their business processes or BI platform (or part of it) for that mater.

I think it is great that Microsoft is investing more and more on the whole cloud concept (both Azure and O365) but any hint that they are thinking of jumping ship from on-premise products is a big mistake. If they leave this space, a competitor will fill this void right in.

pmdci said,
.....

Well at both SharePoint 2014 conference and TechEd conference, they say that they are mobile first and cloud first, with new features being delivered cloud first, with on prem being updated later.

Even if MS move away from traditional on-prem model, doesn't mean that private cloud won't have these services in the future.

deadonthefloor said,

...

What my source heard is that will be no more on-premise SharePoint after the next version. So the whole 'new features being delivered cloud first, with on prem being updated later' is moot.

pmdci said,
...

My point is that legacy on-prem, aka bare metal is going away.

Private cloud == public cloud for the security concious and MS will be able to offer a solution, or you can live migrate from Azure back to Private cloud.

deadonthefloor said,

My point is that legacy on-prem, aka bare metal is going away [...]

And my point is that your point is not MSFT's point -- at least not what they tell its partners around here. ;-)

jacks9000 said,
Isn't it called Office 365 for small business? That comes with SharePoint etc.

My company is not ready to move to the cloud, and for security reasons, probably never will.
The cost of an on-site Sharepoint setup is still abortive.

Yes Access Services is not included in Foundation. What you can also try and do is connect to your existing Access Databases using Business Connectivity Services. To be fair you should be converting your access databases to SQL which will nicely fit in with BCS.

Riva said,
Yes Access Services is not included in Foundation. What you can also try and do is connect to your existing Access Databases using Business Connectivity Services. To be fair you should be converting your access databases to SQL which will nicely fit in with BCS.

Thanks for the info. I think I'll have a look at some opensource "alternatives" to see if any of them might be useful.

I love SharePoint... use it everyday at work... but I agree it needs to be optimized further to run faster and work even better with Explorer like it used to. I think he'll do great.

j2006 said,
I love SharePoint... use it everyday at work... but I agree it needs to be optimized further to run faster and work even better with Explorer like it used to. I think he'll do great.

Sounds like you need proper hardware for SharePoint

Mordkanin said,
Sharepoint is a monster of bloat and sloth for what it does.

Let's hope this isn't a bad omen....


As a SharePoint consultant I need to ask you where is the bloat and coming from?:p
SharePoint is not an out of the shelf product that anyone can pick up and start delivering solutions. It is a web multi-platform. The other issue is how companies adopt; rarely provide end user or admin training. With SharePoint we deliver Intranets, Extranets, Records Management, Business Intelligence, Public Facing web sites and all other sorts of business solutions. SharePoint can accommodate 75% of most business requirements out of the box while the other 25% can be achieved via 3rd party products or customisations. SharePoint 2010 and 2013 are known to have made Microsoft billions of USD the first 6-9 months after release. So where I am concluding is that if SharePoint isn't working for you then you are doing it wrong :D

Riva said,

As a SharePoint consultant I need to ask you where is the bloat and coming from?:p
SharePoint is not an out of the shelf product that anyone can pick up and start delivering solutions. It is a web multi-platform. The other issue is how companies adopt; rarely provide end user or admin training. With SharePoint we deliver Intranets, Extranets, Records Management, Business Intelligence, Public Facing web sites and all other sorts of business solutions. SharePoint can accommodate 75% of most business requirements out of the box while the other 25% can be achieved via 3rd party products or customisations. SharePoint 2010 and 2013 are known to have made Microsoft billions of USD the first 6-9 months after release. So where I am concluding is that if SharePoint isn't working for you then you are doing it wrong :D

Lets ask your customers, if they are also satisfied with what they got for their money. The sales number is not translated into happy customer. This figure doesnt show how many customers regret they let them to be persuaded by pushing consultants (like you for example) to buy that product.
Long story short, in all these PR bullsh*t reports the customer satisfaction is the last thing considered. Which I feel is the shame of the entire industry nowadays, but its another story.

Nik L said,
I personally have delivered quite a few SharePoint systems that have had no disputes regards ROI.

Agreed. If you are acquiring SharePoint for the purposes of a simple solution then your ROI is poor. When you look at it strategically as an IT platform then the ROI is massive.

Riva said,

As a SharePoint consultant I need to ask you where is the bloat and coming from?:p
SharePoint is not an out of the shelf product that anyone can pick up and start delivering solutions. It is a web multi-platform. The other issue is how companies adopt; rarely provide end user or admin training. With SharePoint we deliver Intranets, Extranets, Records Management, Business Intelligence, Public Facing web sites and all other sorts of business solutions. SharePoint can accommodate 75% of most business requirements out of the box while the other 25% can be achieved via 3rd party products or customisations. SharePoint 2010 and 2013 are known to have made Microsoft billions of USD the first 6-9 months after release. So where I am concluding is that if SharePoint isn't working for you then you are doing it wrong :D

As a SharePoint professional, i must admit that is BLOATED. But it is the kind of bloated apps that gives us a lot of money. For example, SP uses at least 8gb of RAM and it is only for a modest configuration, while we have system that uses 2GB of RAM (including OS and DB) and they are serving for 30k customers x day.

Anyways, the future of SharePoint is in the cloud and is amazing cheap.