Time magazine gets official Windows Phone app

On Sunday, the new LinkedIn app for Windows Phone was released. Now, Time magazine has joined the ranks and released its first app for Windows Phone; it's now available for download from the Windows Store Marketplace.

While Time still produces the print weekly magazine, the Windows Phone app also includes videos from the Time.com website along with the extensive and impressive articles and photography that have become the trademarks of the news outlet.

Yet another popular news media outlet, The Daily Beast, has also launched the first version of its Windows Phone app earlier last week.

Finally, WPCentral.com reports that The Wall Street Journal may be the next big media outlet to release a Windows Phone app. Details and a specific release date were not mentioned, although the site claims the launch is "right around the corner."

There's been a surge of recent Windows Phone app releases. The website Windows Phone App List claims that over 82,000 apps have been released for the Windows Phone Marketplace since it was launched in the fall of 2010. It also claims that close to 2,000 apps have been added to the Marketplace in the last two weeks.

Image via Time

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13 Comments

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I think the biggest difference here as compared to Android apps is that these Windows Phone 7 apps really are using the Metro interface instead of coming up with their own because of the sloppiness in design pre-Android 3.0.

Cyborg_X said,
App is slow as **** to load pages even over wifi.

It is a little slow, but theres no reason why it should be. I hope they improve the performance.

It worries me that this is considered front-page news for the Windows Phone 7 eco-system. What does that suggest?

c3ntury said,
It worries me that this is considered front-page news for the Windows Phone 7 eco-system. What does that suggest?

That you are a troll?

c3ntury said,

Please enlighten me on how I'm trolling, if you would.


No you're not. I think its the worst response to a lot statements I see here.
Back to what you said, it's good to have such announcements about major apps; I know I would have missed it.

c3ntury said,

Please enlighten me on how I'm trolling, if you would.

You aren't helping the discussion. Just stating a pointless thing on a news site. Don't like it don't read it. I liked the article. See, who cares.

ccoltmanm said,

You aren't helping the discussion. Just stating a pointless thing on a news site. Don't like it don't read it. I liked the article. See, who cares.

Perhaps I didn't make this clear enough in my original comment, but I wasn't referring to the article itself.

I was moreover talking about the size of the WP7 app store and the amount of ports from iOS and Android of popular applications.

c3ntury said,
It worries me that this is considered front-page news for the Windows Phone 7 eco-system. What does that suggest?

It suggests that Windows Phone is getting more mainstream support/official apps. This is a good thing.

c3ntury said,

Perhaps I didn't make this clear enough in my original comment, but I wasn't referring to the article itself.

I was moreover talking about the size of the WP7 app store and the amount of ports from iOS and Android of popular applications.

Ports? Unless iOS and Android embraced Metro when I wasn't looking, these apps will be from scratch, which is more than I can say for some iOS to Android ports.

c3ntury said,

Perhaps I didn't make this clear enough in my original comment, but I wasn't referring to the article itself.

You are trolling...WP7 is getting more popular apps who care if they are ports....?
I was moreover talking about the size of the WP7 app store and the amount of ports from iOS and Android of popular applications.

c3ntury said,
It worries me that this is considered front-page news for the Windows Phone 7 eco-system. What does that suggest?

Are you really worried? That is the question many asked themselves and once they figured out that you are not really worried then they decided to call you a troll at that point.

Apple and Android both made front page news when they reached milestones in their app counts so what is the difference here?