Tipster claims to reveal details of upcoming Windows Phones

It's fair to say that Windows Phone hasn't exactly taken the market by storm in the two and a half years since it launched. The story for Microsoft's mobile OS is still something of a mixed bag - in some markets, such as Finland and Italy, its market share percentage has soared into double digits; but there remain many regions where the platform is struggling, such as in the US, where Nokia, the largest Windows Phone vendor by some margin, saw its sales fall by almost 43% last quarter

These are uncertain times for Windows Phone to be sure, but that's not stopping manufacturers from lining up a new range of handsets, which a tipster on Reddit claims to have knowledge of. The informant refers to some devices that we already know about, including HTC's mid-range 'Tiara', but adds to previously revealed details on that handset by claiming that it will come in two variants - one with LTE, and one without, for different markets.

Reference is also made to two new Nokia handsets that we've already become acquainted with: 'EOS', which is expected to feature a high-end PureView camera - possibly with a 41MP sensor - and a quad-core chipset; and 'Catwalk', which is believed to be a thin and light device with an aluminium body. Adding to the information already revealed, it's claimed that neither device will include integrated wireless charging but, like the Lumia 820, will offer this feature through optional covers. Nokia is expected to announce one or both of these devices at an event in London on May 14.

But beyond the devices that we already know about, two new handsets are also named. Huawei, which has already released its W1 Windows Phone is said to be lining up the 'Ascend WQ 5'. While we can't verify this specific information, Neowin has received confirmation from a Huawei executive that a second "higher-end" Windows Phone will be added to the company's range this year. 

Samsung is also said to be preparing a new Windows Phone, referred to as 'Cronus LTE'. Assuming the handset materialises, you can expect it to take on the new ATIV branding that the company has adopted for all of its Windows Phone and Windows devices. This, and all of the handsets mentioned above, are said to be arriving between May and August of this year. 

Finally, the tipster appears to refer to 'Max' as an OS update beyond the 'GDR2' (General Distribution Release 2) update which is rolling out soon. It's unclear whether 'Max' refers to the GDR3 update which is expected to bring support for 1080p resolution displays and quad-core processors, and which should arrive before the end of this year, ahead of the 'Blue' update for Windows Phone which is now expected to arrive in early 2014, as Paul Thurrott revealed this week.

While the information revealed by the tipster today certainly sounds credible, bear in mind that it does come from an unverified source, so for now, be sure to approach it with caution, rather than treating it as gospel. 

Source: Reddit | via WMPowerUser

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23 Comments

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The main reason Windows Phone has been struggling in the US is Carrier/OEM adoption.

The Nokia Lumia 920 is THE Flagship Phone, and has been selling great....on ONE Carrier. That was their biggest mistake. How are you going to have a Flagship phone on only one network.

All other OEMs have been half-assing their Windows Phones w/ Mid-Level specs (Compared to their high-end Android phones). Where is the HTC One w/ Windows Phone? Where is the Galaxy S 4 w/ Windows Phone? Who is going to buy a 6-month - 1 year Old Windows Phone device, when the LATEST GREATEST device available is an Android device?

That's been a problem so far but hopefully it will change soon. The Nokia 920 and the HTC 8X used a Snapdragon S4 clocked at 1.5 GHz with a Adreno 225 GPU with 1GB of Ram. Those are basically the same as the Samsung Galaxy S III which was released 5 months earlier and had an extra GB of ram. The Snapdragon 800 will be released first on the LG D801 soon so they won't be first there. But perhaps they could be the first to use a Snapdragon 900/1000.

greensabath said,
The main reason Windows Phone has been struggling in the US is Carrier/OEM adoption.

The Nokia Lumia 920 is THE Flagship Phone, and has been selling great....on ONE Carrier. That was their biggest mistake. How are you going to have a Flagship phone on only one network.

All other OEMs have been half-assing their Windows Phones w/ Mid-Level specs (Compared to their high-end Android phones). Where is the HTC One w/ Windows Phone? Where is the Galaxy S 4 w/ Windows Phone? Who is going to buy a 6-month - 1 year Old Windows Phone device, when the LATEST GREATEST device available is an Android device?

this is not only occuring in the US. same story here in canada. only one carrier offers the 920. my only options via my provider are the 620 and ativ s. wtf?!

and both times when I contacted my company (on the phone AND in store), they both asked me the same question: I totally respect your decision but out of curiosity, what do you like about windows phone? nobody seems to like it/I barely hear stories about it.

The biggest thing that NOBODY ever points out is that the 822 on Verizon (largest US carrier), which is a much inferior phone to the 920 (available ONLY on AT&T), yet sold for the same price as the 920, is the top selling WP8 smartphone in the US!

That tells me that the 920 sales were SEVERELY limited by the exclusivity agreement.

Does MS even want WP to succeed? Or will we see Windows reduced to the PC/x86 version and the portable/ARM versions eventually, completely dropping the phone-only OS?

Carping from the cheap seats? To be honest, few people in the world care much about what's happening in the USA. As we all know, the USA is about a decade behind the rest of the world - particularly Asia and Europe - in mobile usage. The USA completely missed the boat with GSM and the miniscule little carriers in America have the wrong business model to encourage mobile use. All the major telecoms companies are European or Asian today. There are only two handset manufacturers in America, Apple who have lost their innovation lead and Motorola - a basket case that for years didn't even allow ring-tones.

So it's not surprising that Nokia aren't doing well in America. They're doing well here in China though, a market bigger than Europe and USA combined with the world's biggest mobile company, the world's biggest phone company and the world's second biggest telecoms company.

Keep things in perspective and remember, you can't tell who'll win a race by watching the battle for last place.

I am a Lumia 920 owner and when I hold the Iphone 5 it feels flimsy and brittle. The same goes for the other "leading" phones. Yes, the 920 could be lighter but we are talking grams here. I totally love the polycarbon body also.

red hook said,
I am a Lumia 920 owner and when I hold the Iphone 5 it feels flimsy and brittle. The same goes for the other "leading" phones. Yes, the 920 could be lighter but we are talking grams here. I totally love the polycarbon body also.

How is any iPhone flimsy? Its a completely solid build with no areas that give any flex. As for brittle, I guess something on one could smash if you threw it.

Deihmos said,
While the industry is going slim and light Nokia is going fat and heavy. I don't get it.

Dude, this is a phone. If your hand hurts from holding 185g, you should go to gym instead of using a phone.
If it was something like google glass, then the weight would have been a real issue.

Deihmos said,
While the industry is going slim and light Nokia is going fat and heavy. I don't get it.

Because 99% of iPhone users, walk around with shells - making it just as heavy and bulky as the 920. That argument is also rendered moot when you consider the additional tech packed in the 920.

Don't get me wrong; I prefer a thin and light phone. However, phones are still made of glass and other brittle materials that have a tough time withstanding human abuse, without some form of protection. Which is why I'm glad to see phones coming out in aluminum, and a serious interest in flexible LCD displays. That - combined with flexible circuit boards - would make thin and light phones practical.

Deihmos said,
While the industry is going slim and light Nokia is going fat and heavy. I don't get it.

It's because of the way Nokia makes their camera modules.

MrHistamine said,

[...]Which is why I'm glad to see phones coming out in aluminum, and a serious interest in flexible LCD displays. That - combined with flexible circuit boards - would make thin and light phones practical.

I do not understand where this misconception about aluminum started, but it is NOT a good material. It is fairly light, yes, but it is soft and prone to deformation and scratches. Plastic might feel cheap, but it is by far a better material for laptops and phones the same. I hope they stick to plastic.

Quality feel is not the same as build quality.

EDIT: removed Apple references to avoid flamewar

fleawin said,

I do not understand where this misconception about aluminum started, but it is NOT a good material. It is fairly light, yes, but it is soft and prone to deformation and scratches. Plastic might feel cheap, but it is by far a better material for laptops and phones the same. I hope they stick to plastic.

Quality feel is not the same as build quality.

EDIT: removed Apple references to avoid flamewar

Those properties are exactly why it's needed; however, I was referring to an aluminum alloy, not pure aluminum. Plastic is prone to the same issues (especially at the same thickness); at least with aluminum, you'd have the ability to knock and buff the imperfections out yourself (or professionally).

And the "misconception" is not exclusively a product of Apple's usage. Panasonic's ToughBooks employ magnesium alloy (most likely mixed with aluminum) to great effect.

Though, it seems we'll still have a choice in our phone's external materials, so to each their own.

Windows Phone 8 already supports up to 64 cores so no update is required to make it support a comparatively measly four.

All I can say personally, is that this phone:
http://www.pocket-lint.com/new...aluminum-lumia-handset-leak

Is legit. I played with it ages ago. It wasn't aluminum by the way.. I couldn't tell what it was, unless it's aluminum in a way I don't understand. Nice phone, and yes, there is a slight bulge for the camera, because the phone is thinner than the 920. Less "button space" on the bottom of the phone compared to the 920, but a bigger black bar up top. You'll see what I mean when it's announced.

Neobond said,
Windows Phone has a ways to go, and hopefully Microsoft is listening to their growing consumer base.

A ways to go in what regards? I'd like to see them embrace their promise of open testing/delivery of updates that seems to have gone the way of the dodo, but other than that, this is pretty much a fox news headline.. "i'm not going to say anything, other than raise a question where ill insinuate something"

spudtrooper said,

A ways to go in what regards? I'd like to see them embrace their promise of open testing/delivery of updates that seems to have gone the way of the dodo, but other than that, this is pretty much a fox news headline.. "i'm not going to say anything, other than raise a question where ill insinuate something"

Well for starters, MS can start by making sure they are honest with their customers and stop giving them empty promises. The enthusiasts program is just the latest in a long line of them saying one thing and dropping the ball when execution time comes along.

Neobond said,
Windows Phone has a ways to go, and hopefully Microsoft is listening to their growing consumer base.

Except making wp and rt API same, so a dev can code once and target four platforms (x86, ARM, WP and xbox next), I don't see anything "ways to go" in terms of platform.
After that, just more integration (between all devices) from first party apps.

But it has ways to go if you talk about market share though.

Crimson Rain said,

Except making wp and rt API same, so a dev can code once and target four platforms (x86, ARM, WP and xbox next), I don't see anything "ways to go" in terms of platform.

Here here!

Neobond said,
Windows Phone has a ways to go, and hopefully Microsoft is listening to their growing consumer base.
I have found that Microsoft and and Nokia are not listening to users like with windows phone 8 it was rush to market with a lot of bugs to the point it was unusable and users had to wait months to find out out what going on and both Nokia and Microsoft where they where not replying to support requests about it.