Toshiba unveils 5TB 'surveillance' hard drive

There hasn't been much coming out regarding any new additions to Toshiba's product line, besides the unveiling of a new tablet back in June. Out of this silence, Toshiba has announced a new 5TB hard drive, although it is not meant for the usual consumer market.

The hard drive, dubbed the MD04ABA-V Series, is touted as a "surveillance hard disk drive" and was made to be used for (you guessed it) surveillance. The products specifications are pretty standard: it has the usual 3.5-inch desktop form factor, offering both 4 and 5TB options, 128MiB cache, a 1 million hour Mean Time Between Failures rating (or MTBF for short,) as well as rotational vibration damping for use in RAID enclosures. It also supports incoming data streams from up to 32 high definition cameras and is able to run around the clock. Also, they do not disclose the disk speed, claiming that it is "low," and could mean that the component may spin between 5000 and 6000 rotations per minute.

Toshiba claims that customers using the new drive will be able to "retain higher resolution surveillance video data for longer periods using fewer HDDs," while conserving energy and space. This means that security companies will be able to keep the hi-res videos that they need for investigations for a longer amount of time, potentially allowing more cases to be solved, and leading to a safer experience wherever these hard disks are in use.

Source: Toshiba | Image via The Register

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8 Comments

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Kinda pathetic to read about HD maker claiming about their drive was made for "surveillance" at high res but all of the surveillance footage I see is never clear. It's all blurry. And their surveillance camera don't last long too. And for a 5000-6000 RPM drive to be a "surveillance" type of drive, kinda make me wanna laugh. I mean the least speed should be at 7200RPM. At 5000-6000RPM while taking in 32 data stream is just laughable claim.

Krome said,
Kinda pathetic to read about HD maker claiming about their drive was made for "surveillance" at high res but all of the surveillance footage I see is never clear. It's all blurry. And their surveillance camera don't last long too. And for a 5000-6000 RPM drive to be a "surveillance" type of drive, kinda make me wanna laugh. I mean the least speed should be at 7200RPM. At 5000-6000RPM while taking in 32 data stream is just laughable claim.

You have to take into account the buffers and their size plus the size of the cache in use. The camera feed isn't being written to the hard drive right away, it's going into a RAM buffer of some size, then off to the drives cache and then finally written to the platter. By then it doesn't have to spin that fast as it's not trying to keep up with the feeds.

Krome said,
Kinda pathetic to read about HD maker claiming about their drive was made for "surveillance" at high res but all of the surveillance footage I see is never clear. It's all blurry. And their surveillance camera don't last long too. And for a 5000-6000 RPM drive to be a "surveillance" type of drive, kinda make me wanna laugh. I mean the least speed should be at 7200RPM. At 5000-6000RPM while taking in 32 data stream is just laughable claim.

As someone who works in the surveillance industry, I think that if you only ever see unclear footage, then they are in major need of an upgrade to their cameras and storage. Broadcast quality HD recorded video is the norm these days.

Krome said,
Kinda pathetic to read about HD maker claiming about their drive was made for "surveillance" at high res but all of the surveillance footage I see is never clear. It's all blurry.

1) At the NSA, we don't really see blurry surveillance footage. Maybe that footage from the convenience store you see is because they're filming with a potato.

2) Even if the footage is filmed with a potato, we can press a couple of buttons and "enhance" to razor sharp resolution.

3) You might have heard back in the 1980s that your license plate can be read from low-earth orbiting satellites in space. Today, we can see the individual pixels on your Retina(tm) display from our secret moon base.

- E. Snowden