Track your deceased relatives with a coffin GPS

Worried that your dead relatives may rise from the dead and wander off? There’s an app for that! The Daily Mail points out that a natural burial site in Indiana, The Preserve, will place a GPS transmitter in the deceased’s casket.

The GPS (called iGrave) is there to let staff members easily identify who is buried where, as well as giving family members the ability to track down their loved ones. On the surface, this sounds silly: Unless the zombie apocalypse begins, your relatives are probably not going to move. However, since natural burial sites do not use traditional tombstones, this lets people accurately identify where the bodies are located.

While this could be useful for people who don’t visit the cemetery often, we think that providing a simple map or GPS coordinates might be a better long-term solution since the batteries in the iGrave only last for a few years. This might be a technology-based solution to a problem that doesn’t really exist.

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27 Comments

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Doesn't the majority of caskets come with identification capsules already? No batteries needed. If a casket happens to leave its resting place, simply unscrew the capsule and all of the information is there.

As far as locating where a body is, that's the responsibility of those who keep those records. Incompetence seems to be the real problem there.

The whole burial industry is another way of making money and we are stupid enough to follow outdated traditions and bury bones and visit them from time to time like a dog...

Maybe when I die I hope people will tape fireworks round my body and shoot me to skie where I can be burned to ashes in a beautiful spectacular ending!

Just saying sounds cooler then a gps tracker.

With some of the reports I've read in the news, I could sadly see people feeling the need to tag deceased loved ones just to verify they were actually buried in the lot they paid for, & in the casket they paid for as well.

I'd imagine it could also be very useful for those who bury arms, ammo, etc., so if sales of the tech take off, that may be part of the reason why.

Wonderful! We'll finally have a conclusive final proof that both Heaven and Hell are actually located right here on Earth.

THolman said,
Doesn't putting a GPS device in there kind of defeat the point of a natural, environmentally friendly burial?

lol - hadn't even thought of that angle.

leave it up to someone to come up with something as stupid as this instead of just putting up a solar light or something on the top to mark it.. gotta make a dishonest buck some how I guess.

sava700 said,
leave it up to someone to come up with something as stupid as this instead of just putting up a solar light or something on the top to mark it.. gotta make a dishonest buck some how I guess.

A "natural" grave has no marker, it is meant to leave no environmental impact. A solar light, however little there may be, has toxic materials in it.

schubb2003 said,

A "natural" grave has no marker, it is meant to leave no environmental impact. A solar light, however little there may be, has toxic materials in it.


Nothing "natural" about having a GPS transmitter in your coffin. A GPS transmitter, however little there may be, has toxic materials in it.

It's getting pretty sad...

Besides...as someone else said on here...the battery would fail...or the worms would eat through the GPS after a certain amount of time.

Or forget about getting your deceased loved one a GPS and have them cremated and put on your fireplace mantle. You won't lose them there.

uh how would a GPS device work underground in a casket? sure this isn't some kind of RFID tagging or something else? especially since GPS requires power, and a battery would go dead, no pun intended


edit: ok read the full source article... all they do is put a RFID "tag" in the casket and use a pipe locator to find it, the same thing that gas and water companies use to tag and find their underground pipelines now......

neufuse said,
uh how would a GPS device work underground in a casket? sure this isn't some kind of RFID tagging or something else? especially since GPS requires power, and a battery would go dead, no pun intended


edit: ok read the full source article... all they do is put a RFID "tag" in the casket and use a pipe locator to find it, the same thing that gas and water companies use to tag and find their underground pipelines now......


Actually, the article says that there are different versions of iGrave. Some use RFID, and some use actual GPS satellites. If you're only a few feet underground, the satellite would probably still work. The battery life is stated as only a few years though and is reflected in both my article and the original.

Ever hear of lat. & long. coordinates? You don't need an RFID tag or GPS at the grave.

I can see this usable at Arlington. Select a name and gps points you to the coordinates....only at Arlington, the body under the headstone is more than likely 33% wrong.

Although lat & long coordinates would work, it could potentially be troublesome in places with seismic activity. I think it the big Japan earthquake recently, parts of Japan moved as much as 8-13 feet. Suddenly, you would need updated lat/lon to find your loved one.