TwitPic founder launches Twitter competitor, Heello

Twitter and TwitPic founder Noah Everett don't exactly get along ever since the former announced its own in-house picture service, executed by Photobucket. There would be no better time nor reason for Everett to launch his own micro-blogging social media service, which is why he did. Noah Everett, today, launched Heello, his answer to Twitter.

Heello works -- mostly -- exactly like Twitter does in practically every single way, except the nomenclature is different. Instead of tweets, users can "ping." Instead of retweeting, you're invited to "echo" a "ping." And unlike the perhaps ill-fated connotation of following, you can "listen" to users' pings. However, the basic function is the same: you read updates from friends at 140 characters per... ping, you can see a specific ping at a time, you can reference another user by using the @ symbol, and you get a stream of everyone's pings that you're listening to on the homepage.

The main difference: you can share these on Twitter and Facebook. Though it's wise in a self-advertising aspect, we don't imagine Heello needs much more coverage than it's perhaps going to get from just the fact that it launched and who its founder is.

Everett didn't exactly make it a secret that he was disappointed with Twitter's self-hosted pictures announcement — even more so that the company didn't think to contact TwitPic. That service fully launched yesterday. Twitter, furthermore, has gotten into some quibbles from developers' ends for adding features third parties usually took care of, sometimes rendering their applications or services useless, all of which spurred when the company created its official application for iPhone by acquiring then-Tweetie.

Twitter is certainly not the first in the micro-blogging game, but it definitely has gained the most traction and popularity. Though Heello seems easy and intuitive enough to use (besides the fact that when I was trying it out, the service told me I had exceeded my 140 character limit when in reality I had five characters left) but it obviously remains to be seen if it will take off or just be seen as a clone.

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19 Comments

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He should have upped the character limit and tried a new design. This service looks exactly like twitter. It needs some different implementations to gain users. If not, why change to this?

Looks awful...

I was expecting to see a much neater twitter design but all I saw was twitter stripped and new naming which just doesn't work as good. Twitter has become the name for "tweeting".

Twitter is too well embedded in the world for anyone to care. Everything media/entertainment-related is on Twitter, and as we've seen from the riots is great for spreading news too. Twitter also has the desktop and mobile apps, as well as plenty of third-party services tied to it. Launching something that does exactly the same thing (even down to the same character limit) is a total waste of time and money.

Don't see this getting off the ground. It sounds exactly like Twitter with another name. Services already exist that allow you to update to Twitter and Facebook simutaneously, so suddenly Heello doesn't really have any features that Twitter or third-party social networking apps doesn't have.

And besides, it just yet another service that people have to sign up for, and people will probably be like "I have a Facebook, I have a Twitter, I have a..." etc., so this is just one extra thing.

Lucas said,
I smell some type of lawsuit, lets see how long it takes.
looks like a direct rip.. wonder if it is a joke?

Without using the words follow, twitter or update. Describe heelo to me.

Won't take off, might in the tech world but that's about it.

Nicholas-c said,
Won't take off, might in the tech world but that's about it.
that's what they said about twitter

I don't see this taking off. Twitter is a household name, but the average joe consumer will have no idea who the twitpic founder is, or will even hear about heello. They know Twitter, they know the people on twitter, what does this new platform offer the average user over a well known and established site?

Ruran said,
I don't see this taking off. Twitter is a household name, but the average joe consumer will have no idea who the twitpic founder is, or will even hear about heello. They know Twitter, they know the people on twitter, what does this new platform offer the average user over a well known and established site?
No point in moving as it does the same thing lol. The only new thing is sharing to twitter and facebook.... I can do this from diaspora