Ubuntu implements units policy, will switch to base-10 units in future release

Ubuntu's future 10.10 operating system is going to make a small, but contentious change to how file sizes are represented. Like most other operating systems using binary prefixes, Ubuntu currently represents 1 kB (kilobyte) as 1024 bytes (base-2). But starting with 10.10, a switch to SI prefixes (base-10) will denote 1 kB as 1000 bytes, 1 MB as 1000 kB, 1 GB as 1000 MB, and so on. 

It was first reported that 10.04 Lucid Lynx would make the switch to base-10, but it was eventually delayed to lucid+1 (10.10) as all applications didn't comply with the new units policy and were still using base-2. 

The new units policy establishes two basic guidelines: applications should use the IEC/binary prefix for base-2 units and the SI prefix for base-10 units. The SI prefix should not be mixed with base-2 units. The exact policy from the wiki is outlined below: 

Applications must use IEC standard for base-2 units:

  • 1 KiB (kibibyte) = 1,024 bytes (Note: big k)
  • 1 MiB (mebibyte) = 1,024 KiB = 1,048,576 bytes
  • 1 GiB (gibibyte) = 1,024 MiB = 1,048,576 KiB = 1,073,741,824 bytes
  • 1 TiB (tebibyte) = 1,024 GiB = 1,048,576 MiB = 1,073,741,824 KiB = 1,099,511,627,776 bytes

Applications must use SI standard for base-10 units:

  • 1 kB (kilobyte) = 1,000 bytes (Note: small k)
  • 1 MB (megabyte) = 1,000 kB = 1,000,000 bytes
  • 1 GB (gigabyte) = 1,000 MB = 1,000,000 kB = 1,000,000,000 bytes
  • 1 TB (terabyte) = 1,000 GB = 1,000,000 MB = 1,000,000,000 kB = 1,000,000,000,000 bytes

It is not allowed to use the SI standard for base-2 units:

  • 1 kB ≠ 1,024 bytes
  • KB (with a big k) does not exist

Additional implementation guidelines are also outlined: base-10 should be used to represent network bandwidth and disk sizes while RAM sizes should use base-2. File sizes can either be shown in both base-10 and base-2, only base-10, or a user option to choose between the two (but with base-10 set as the default). 

This new counting will finally put them in line with the standard Greek meaning of "kilo" as 1000 and will seek to alleviate the confusion that regular consumers often have when buying a new hard drive. The pros are not exclusive of the cons though, as inconsistencies between different operating systems presents a troubling user experience dilemma. Other new confusions that this would bring are also outlined in the wiki: 

  • CD-ROM sizes are specified in MiB, but the manufacturers label this "MB" (a "700 MB" CD-ROM contains approximately 700 MiB = 737 MB).
  • Memory (RAM, ROM) is specified in base 2, but labeled with SI prefixes. For example, a "512 MB" RAM contains 512 MiB = 536.9 MB.

Apple themselves moved over to base-10 counting with the release of 10.6 Snow Leopard. Previous Mac OS X operating systems from 10.0 to 10.5 measured file and drive sizes in base-2. 

Credit to Mephistopheles for the news tip.

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119 Comments

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This is just one of those dumb moments, I can understand why as they are trying to confirm to a standard. But seriously this is a dumb standard.

My question is this, if they are shifting to base 10 for measuring bytes are they changing it so that there are 10 bits to a byte as well. Otherwise what is the point, if they retain 8 bits = 1 byte then it just makes things even worse because there is an inconsistency in the base up through the levels.

It's disappointing that so many of Neowin's readers don't seem to understand what base 10 and base 2 means. 5 GB, 5 GiB and 1024 bytes are all base 10 numbers. 5 GB in base 10 is 101 GB in base 2. The confusing article didn't help.

The Ubuntu policy is NOT about number systems. It is NOT about units either, it's about prefixes.

It may make sense to use the base 2 based prefixes when dealing with base 2 numbers, that's rows of 1's and 0's. But when using base 10 numbers, numbers represented with 0's, 1's, 2's, 3's etc. up to 9's, you should use base 10 based prefixes. Kilo-, mega-, giga- , tera-, peta- etc. Those are SI-standard prefixes and each of those that i mentioned are exactly 1000 x unit increment of the former.

1024 is a base 10 number, it's 10000000000 in base 2. It's not in any way more difficult for the logical gates of modern computers to divide by 10000000000 (1024) than it is to divide by 1111101000 (1000). It may be harder for humans to simulate the binary devision but from a hardware perspective there's no difference in difficulty. However it's much harder for humans to divide with 1024 than 1000 in base 10. That's why computers should use the standard kilo- means 1000 when representing numbers for humans.

Mixing base-2 information with base-10 units was the biggest stuff up in computing history. It's like measuring a distance in kilometers and then giving it then unit of miles instead. 1024 bits is not a kilobyte, it is 1.024kB (or 1 KiB). Maybe the people complaining about this should push for the new IEC units to be adopted by consumer products, instead of continuing to bend the SI units to fit base-2.

Exactly, the only reason this is even an issue is because 1024 happens to be close to 1000, not because they're actually related at all.

On another note, we should probably get rid of the decimal system entirely, and switch to hex. The decimal system exists because we have ten fingers in each hand. A childish concept. In reality, the simplest number system is base 2, the simplest logic is boolean logic, and as such we should use those as a solid base to build up on higher concepts. I suggest hex because of its compactness and because it fits nicely with binary numerals.

toroleasts said,
Exactly, the only reason this is even an issue is because 1024 happens to be close to 1000, not because they're actually related at all.

On another note, we should probably get rid of the decimal system entirely, and switch to hex. The decimal system exists because we have ten fingers in each hand. A childish concept. In reality, the simplest number system is base 2, the simplest logic is boolean logic, and as such we should use those as a solid base to build up on higher concepts. I suggest hex because of its compactness and because it fits nicely with binary numerals.

Cool!

I am off to engineer a super race of humans with 6 extra fingers!

blasted ... i liked the 1024 system ... and whenever i spoke with computer illiterates i would dumb it down to 1000 and give them a rough estimate ....

sad, i am a sad panda

Nobody is asking you to use powers of 10 when discussing binary sizes, just that you use the correct units (Ki, Mi, Gi, Ti and so on). This switch should have been made decades ago.

Wow that says a lot. Adapt to those not informed instead of teaching them.

Kinda sounds like the man who was given a fish...

Agree on that, architecture is based on base-2, and you can't change that ever. That you see 500GB labeled HDD does not mean that the computer actually see 500GB, it's going to be less because manufacturers use base-10 (why the hell?).

Actually is more lying than doing some good. As being programmer, I just can't this that simple.

This is total bull****, computers work in BASE 2. I am completely disappointed in ubuntu. So now because the dumb people who bought a 500GB hd freak out when it says 465.66GB, educated people have to deal with multiple standards now?

Anyone who thinks this is a good idea is a retard that doesn't understand programming, and is literally subhuman trash for trying to impose their plebeian logic in an operating system.

toroleasts said,
Anyone who thinks this is a good idea is a retard that doesn't understand programming, and is literally subhuman trash for trying to impose their plebeian logic in an operating system.

Indeed, you would have to be a retard of the very highest order to resist positive change to an unambiguous notation .

And still the Linux community is upset and wonders why no normal PC user wants to switch to any of their various retarded distros. Ubuntu's switch to left-hand side window controls takes the cake though.

It will be weird to calculate ram and hard drive space differently. Having 4GB ram not equal 4GB of hard drive space is bothersome. It just doesn't seem right.

This is a problem because it's a misrepresentation of numbers. Computers are base-2, that's how things are measured. Displaying binary data in a base-10 format shouldn't be an option at all.

Honestly just have Windows output everything in kibis, mebis, etc... with Ki and Mi. Most consumers will ignore the i anyway, and for those that don't, they'll realize it's the hardware manufacturers that are screwing them over.

You know, it they were just consistent with this there wouldn't have been a whole lot of confusion to begin with.

In the end it doesn't really matter.

How hard is it to remember that the next greatest unit is 1024 of the prior unit? This is really all they need to know.

It's easy to see just by looking at the replies here and in the forum thread which members here have been using computers since the 70's or 80's and those who have only been using them for the last decade or so.

roadwarrior said,
It's easy to see just by looking at the replies here and in the forum thread which members here have been using computers since the 70's or 80's and those who have only been using them for the last decade or so.

No kidding.

roadwarrior said,
It's easy to see just by looking at the replies here and in the forum thread which members here have been using computers since the 70's or 80's and those who have only been using them for the last decade or so.
Funny, but I have been using computers since CP/M on a Commodore PET in elementary school.

I just don't get upset over this item to make a system-wide standard, that is user selectable.

I know computing uses powers of 2, but I just don't think that this is the biggest issue out there.

markjensen said,
Funny, but I have been using computers since CP/M on a Commodore PET in elementary school.

Same here, although I think we used TRS-80's more.

I just don't get upset over this item to make a system-wide standard, that is user selectable.

I'm not upset over anything, I just think it's silly for the self-important "standards organizations" to retroactively try to change a de-facto standard that has been in place for DECADES simply because the terminology means something else in a totally different field. All I can say to them is "good luck getting manufacturers and the media (print, news, and even TV and movies) to change just because you say so".

Edited by roadwarrior, Mar 27 2010, 4:08pm :

So, is your problem with standard organizations (like the one that created the Metric system?) or with making a distro consistent across the board and letting the user select which units he/she prefers (if he/she has a preference, that is)?

Both of those positions seems a little odd to me.

Is your point that people that have used computers for several decades for some reason hate consitency in their use of units? While it is true that old-timers tend to resist change (even for the better, as in this case), I do think that even older people should be able to see the sense in unamiguous and consistent units.

Also, I've been working with computers for over 15 years, and when speaking to any non-computer person, I've ALWAYS used base-10 when talking about space, size, speed, etc.

1 Gig? About a thousand megs.
3 Mbps connection? About 300K a second.
1 K? About a thousand bytes.

Base 10 is more natural and is easier to understand.

More people have been ANGERED about their hard drives not showing up at the exact size advertised in Windows than will be angered that things aren't "base 2" moon number.

Xenomorph said,
More people have been ANGERED about their hard drives not showing up at the exact size advertised in Windows than will be angered that things aren't "base 2" moon number.

The hard drive issue was exactly because the manufacturers refused to use the accepted standard and chose to use base 10 in order to make their drives look bigger. Many of the got sued over it too.

Xenomorph said,
Also, I've been working with computers for over 15 years, and when speaking to any non-computer person, I've ALWAYS used base-10 when talking about space, size, speed, etc.

1 Gig? About a thousand megs.
3 Mbps connection? About 300K a second.
1 K? About a thousand bytes.

Base 10 is more natural and is easier to understand.

More people have been ANGERED about their hard drives not showing up at the exact size advertised in Windows than will be angered that things aren't "base 2" moon number.

But even more monoric people will actually feel that Windows eats their disk space and switch to OSX because they do.
O.o

Honestly, I liked how Mac OS X did this.

I liked how I could make a "300 Gig" partition, and it measured out to be 300,000,000,000 exactly.

I think Ubuntu trying to "think different" is a GOOD thing. Linux as a Deskop OS has advanced at a glacier's pace over the past 15 years. Always trying to play catch up, never offering anything amazing or even what most people want.
If Ubuntu starts making wacky changes, something may catch peoples' attention.

Xenomorph said,
Honestly, I liked how Mac OS X did this.

I liked how I could make a "300 Gig" partition, and it measured out to be 300,000,000,000 exactly.

I think Ubuntu trying to "think different" is a GOOD thing. Linux as a Deskop OS has advanced at a glacier's pace over the past 15 years. Always trying to play catch up, never offering anything amazing or even what most people want.
If Ubuntu starts making wacky changes, something may catch peoples' attention.

ubuntu didn't exist before 2004 so..

what are you all crying about? they are setting a standard to represent file sizes correctly without confusion, if it says kb, Kb, kB or whatever, think of it as base 10.. if it says kib, kIb, KiB, KIb or something it is base 2... seems most of you would want to see KiB as your setting, which I also think of as "normal", they should have ONLY KiB as a third option and set as default though.

what a disappointment, I'm still ANDing the old fashion way ... pencil and paper ... c'mon folks we can't dummy proof everything

Why are all the "angry" people acting like cod liver oil is being forced down their throats?

This is a distro default for consistency among apps. And it is user-selectable, so the anal-retentive can select base-2, and the rest of the world can just be happy knowing that the same values will be shown system-wide.

What is here to get all worked up about?

chadlachlanross said,
So does this mean they will start advertising 1 TB hard drives by their actual size of 931 Gb?

But the drive is actually 1TB.

bob_c_b said,

But the drive is actually 1TB.

By the 'new' standard, yes, and I get that system will now start calculating space so it seems that formerly 931 Gb now displays as a 1TB drive.... but it's been so damn annoying.

chadlachlanross said,
So does this mean they will start advertising 1 TB hard drives by their actual size of 931 Gb?

You must mean 931 GiB.

chadlachlanross said,

By the 'new' standard, yes, and I get that system will now start calculating space so it seems that formerly 931 Gb now displays as a 1TB drive.... but it's been so damn annoying.

Yep, losing capacity due to the numerical interpretation is great fun. People would rather see the truth then over simplified moronic guesstimates.

Digitalx said,

Yep, losing capacity due to the numerical interpretation is great fun. People would rather see the truth then over simplified moronic guesstimates.

You're not "loosing" space. This change doesn't do anything but paint the space differently. You still have the same amount of space and programs will still use the same amount.

would the so called dump consumers this is aimed at simply not walk into the local computer store and by a Windows 7 laptop/PC.? so kinda dumb really.. i dont see any consumer going for Linux. Wierd!!

I don't really like that. Apart from HD and Flash memory manufacturers, base-2 notations are everywhere. The manufacturers should use base-2 but it will put them in problems with their current offerings.

The end users only will get confused between those two notations.

Yay we are dumbing down again for the sake of consumers and their inability to learn.

To aid them even more we could measure them in Green Bottles so then they have a song to aid their learning as well.

Orange Battery said,
Yay we are dumbing down again for the sake of consumers and their inability to learn.

To aid them even more we could measure them in Green Bottles so then they have a song to aid their learning as well.

+1

AFAIK, Ubuntu changed the position of window buttons (minimize, maximize and close) to left-hand side, which is same as Mac, few weeks ago.

Now, Ubuntu is going to copy the unit policy from Mac too?

Can't Ubuntu, or even Linux community, build their own style?

GraphiteCube said,
AFAIK, Ubuntu changed the position of window buttons (minimize, maximize and close) to left-hand side, which is same as Mac, few weeks ago.

Now, Ubuntu is going to copy the unit policy from Mac too?

Can't Ubuntu, or even Linux community, build their own style?

They're probably deciding to target the Mac market more over the Windows one in the immediate future, as they're more likely to try a different OS.
Either that or they recently got a load of developers who love their Macs too much.

GraphiteCube said,
AFAIK, Ubuntu changed the position of window buttons (minimize, maximize and close) to left-hand side, which is same as Mac, few weeks ago.

Now, Ubuntu is going to copy the unit policy from Mac too?

Can't Ubuntu, or even Linux community, build their own style?

Starting to think so myself a bit that they're side tracking themselves a bit too much with copied ideas.

GraphiteCube said,
AFAIK, Ubuntu changed the position of window buttons (minimize, maximize and close) to left-hand side, which is same as Mac, few weeks ago.

Now, Ubuntu is going to copy the unit policy from Mac too?

Can't Ubuntu, or even Linux community, build their own style?


Thanks God there something call "third parties" that will help on creating a better system.

I'm triple booting the beta on my mac now . I'm fairly happy with it.. but if it is actually their goal to get the mac market share (as someone suggested), then they should improve their mac drivers.

Who cares for some buggy linux distro? They should fix more important issues than this. Anyway there is no chance that i replace my Windows 7 with some open source sh*t..

6205 said,
Who cares for some buggy linux distro? They should fix more important issues than this. Anyway there is no chance that i replace my Windows 7 with some open source sh*t..
Good job troll.

Hahaha, awesome. I love how Linux (especially Ubuntu) manages to shoot itself into the foot over and over again.
Brilliant idea to mix both ways, why not invent another method for file-size just for the sake of making life "easier"? - I vote for a base 1111 system, so 1 KB (note: capital Kb) equals 1111 b (note: small b) isnt that great? So we habe kB, kiB, Kb and maybe somebody invents something for klb (note: L not I).

Guys, seriously this cannot continue, first apple, now Ubuntu? Do you want to look exactly everywhere if there's a small I in between the letters or not and then re-think accordingly?
I like the current system, and apart from the hard-drives everyone uses base-2 notation.

Do you really want to go to a shop an buy 4.194304 GB of RAM?
And when you download a file, would you really like to check first if its base-2, base-10 (according to the notation) and then even *check* if they're notation is correct in the first place?
Thats ridiculous, stick to base-2 and stop to confuse everyone; this certainly doesn't make anything easier.

FusionOpz said,
Hate to tell you but hard drive and flash memory manufacturers use base 10....

Except Microsoft use Base2, so does CISCO, and it's how it's taught in any computing degree is base2.
kiliobyte = 1024

tunafish said,

Except Microsoft use Base2, so does CISCO, and it's how it's taught in any computing degree is base2.
kiliobyte = 1024


I most certainly learned about kilobytes and KIBIbytes in my computing degree, so that invalidates your statement ;-)

tunafish said,
Except Microsoft use Base2, so does CISCO, and it's how it's taught in any computing degree is base2.
kiliobyte = 1024

Kiliobyte? lol.

FusionOpz said,
Hate to tell you but hard drive and flash memory manufacturers use base 10....
But aren't they the only ones? and everyone else has always hated them for it, and it's cause legal battles over actual disk sizes.

Mathiasdm said,

I most certainly learned about kilobytes and KIBIbytes in my computing degree, so that invalidates your statement ;-)

Degree maybe - we have no idea which one where or who from so yeah. industry qualifications they don't so you're invalidated again.

Digitalx said,

Degree maybe - we have no idea which one where or who from so yeah. industry qualifications they don't so you're invalidated again.

Brilliant. You make up 'facts', and when you are refuted, you make up another 'fact'.

Digitalx said,

Degree maybe - we have no idea which one where or who from so yeah. industry qualifications they don't so you're invalidated again.

lolwat

ZeroSkyX said,

I like the current system, and apart from the hard-drives everyone uses base-2 notation

Edited by zeroskyx, Mar 27 2010, 4:36pm :

Digitalx said,

Degree maybe - we have no idea which one where or who from so yeah. industry qualifications they don't so you're invalidated again.

Yer basically any industry qualification like CCNA will do everything in base2.
Heck when I done a course in software development we where only taught base2

In my engineering degree we were taught base 10, oh wait it's an SI unit we already knew it because we use SI units properly for everything.

Extremely stupid idea; Now I'm going to be confused Just shoo away Ubuntu, don't go around calling yourself Linux, you're just an embarrassment.

Billus said,
Extremely stupid idea; Now I'm going to be confused Just shoo away Ubuntu, don't go around calling yourself Linux, you're just an embarrassment.

I used to like ubuntu nut now i backing off.

[/facepalm]
Really bad idea of them doing this. thing's like this would really irritate power users of linux who're generally the majority of users. False data indication is bad in more ways then good.

I wonder why Microsoft uses SI prefixes with base 2 units for their storage and hardware information... oh that's right they're not over simplified morons. Remember what happened to seagate selling their drives using base 10 unit indication...

How do you explain 1.44 MB floppy disks then? They are 1.38 MiB or 1.47 MB

1.44 * 1000 * 1024 bytes

SI is the way of the future, using base 2 with SI prefixes is just an archaic embarrassment.

smithy_dll said,
SI is the way of the future, using base 2 with SI prefixes is just an archaic embarrassment.
Except memory quantities in computers are a power of two instead of multiples of ten, and SI was invented hundreds of years before bits and computers.

smithy_dll said,
How do you explain 1.44 MB floppy disks then? They are 1.38 MiB or 1.47 MB

1.44 * 1000 * 1024 bytes

SI is the way of the future, using base 2 with SI prefixes is just an archaic embarrassment.

How is it and embarrassment when your data doesn't lie to you about how much is there or what it's full size is...base 2 units are in the I.T industry is pretty much only thing taught even through tertiary education and qualifications and things. Only people who use otherwise are either guessing, lazy or don't have a clue anyway what a kilobyte is. Numerical rounding should never exist in data information because it will always leave blanks which is not a good thing ever.

Edited by Digitalx, Mar 27 2010, 3:54pm :

Digitalx said,

How is it and embarrassment when your data doesn't lie to you about how much is there or what it's full size is...base 2 units are in the I.T industry is pretty much only thing taught even through tertiary education and qualifications and things. Only people who use otherwise are either guessing, lazy or don't have a clue anyway what a kilobyte is. Numerical rounding should never exist in data information because it will always leave blanks which is not a good thing ever.


True. Computer Tech is a root of mathematics, math must be always exact.
It will never be the same saying:
2.2 cm = 2 cm

Because if you construct a building with this measures, and not the exact ones, is very probable it will fall apart.

You must have gone to school a long time ago because as I went through uni, lecturers were constantly corrected on the false idea that kilo = 1024 by students, and after a healthy discussion the classes reverted to kilo = 1000.

Data should always be internally communicated in bytes IMO. From the user's point of view it doesn't matter how many decimal points you show them, just don't show too many. If you have noticed windows doesn't show every decimal point when it abuses SI units by using them for base-2. If the IT industry wants to use base-2, then invent your own units, oh wait you have, the IEC base units mentioned in TFA.

By the way, nothing is exactly, it's always a nominal quantity with a tolerance. That's why your building probably won't collapse if they use 22 mm instead of 20 mm.

smithy_dll said,
You must have gone to school a long time ago because as I went through uni, lecturers were constantly corrected on the false idea that kilo = 1024 by students, and after a healthy discussion the classes reverted to kilo = 1000.

Remind me to keep my children away from that school.

Razor_D said,
OS X actually did this first in Snow Leopard.

It's much easier for consumers!

they did this because most apple customers are retards...

tunafish said,
oh come on, these units are always base 2, it's how your taught in CCNA, MCSE etc!!! Screw you ubuntu!

If by always you mean in the very small field of MSCE/CCNA, outside of that everyone obeys SI units. I suppose you don't obey speed limits either due to unit issues?

smithy_dll said,

If by always you mean in the very small field of MSCE/CCNA, outside of that everyone obeys SI units. I suppose you don't obey speed limits either due to unit issues?

What the hell has speed got to do with this topic? If you must really know i do follow speed limits.

CCNA and MCSE etc small, oh really grow up. Digital system are based on multiples of powers of 2, and guess what computers deal with? Oh it quite possibly cant be binary can it.......
Quite frankly in the computing world and networking world a kilobyte will always be 1024, it's how it always has been.

Edited by tunafish, Mar 27 2010, 12:52pm :

tunafish said,

Digital system are based on multiples of powers of 2, and guess what computers deal with? Oh it quite possibly cant be binary can it.......

Well, maybe you should stop referring to them as 1024 then.. since, you know, 1024 is in decimals
If you want to stick with binaries, fine, say 100,0000,0000 bytes, not 1024.

smithy_dll said,

If by always you mean in the very small field of MSCE/CCNA, outside of that everyone obeys SI units. I suppose you don't obey speed limits either due to unit issues?

SI units don't make sense here. Addressing is done in base-2. One kilobyte is a 0x400 page.

tunafish said,

...
Quite frankly in the computing world and networking world a kilobyte will always be 1024, it's how it always has been.

Yeah... It's Base 10 in Networking (1Kbps = 1000 bits per second)

This is one of the reasons people want to unify it with the standard units.

MioTheGreat said,

SI units don't make sense here. Addressing is done in base-2. One kilobyte is a 0x400 page.


Which is why they should use KiB there, to eliminate the confusion.

I may be wrong here, but if they're measuring disk space in base 2 and file size in base 10, isn't that just going to confuse people?

You are wrong. They'll be measuring both disk space and file sizes using the same unit, bytes. But more importantly they will be using the same prefixes for both and you will know if it's the power of two based prefix or the standard prefix that's also used for other units.

Call me old fashioned, but I much prefer Base-2. Would it really be that much extra effort to make it a user configurable option somewhere? Have Base-10 be the default, but enable Base-2 for those of us who know the pitfalls of Hard Drives?

Kushan said,
Call me old fashioned, but I much prefer Base-2. Would it really be that much extra effort to make it a user configurable option somewhere? Have Base-10 be the default, but enable Base-2 for those of us who know the pitfalls of Hard Drives?


Did you miss this line?

File sizes can either be shown in both base-10 and base-2, only base-10, or a user option to choose between the two (but with base-10 set as the default).

markjensen said,


Did you miss this line?

File sizes can either be shown in both base-10 and base-2, only base-10, or a user option to choose between the two (but with base-10 set as the default).

This is actually going to make people retarded and cause yet more problems with 'why do I not have enough space' or whatnot, I can't believe they are doing this, I've never liked ubuntu and they do this which just makes me hate that lame distro more.

n_K said,

This is actually going to make people retarded and cause yet more problems with 'why do I not have enough space' or whatnot, I can't believe they are doing this, I've never liked ubuntu and they do this which just makes me hate that lame distro more.

Well, I guess it is cool to hate "lame" distros. More power to you.

There is a system-wide default, and the user can change it if they want.

Nothing to be angry about.

Edited by markjensen, Mar 27 2010, 1:01pm :

n_K said,
This is actually going to make people retarded and cause yet more problems with 'why do I not have enough space' or whatnot, I can't believe they are doing this, I've never liked ubuntu and they do this which just makes me hate that lame distro more.

Anyone "retarded" enough to wonder where all their space has gone with a change like this isn't likely to be using linux.

protocol7 said,

Anyone "retarded" enough to wonder where all their space has gone with a change like this isn't likely to be using linux.

+1 MILLION!

TonyLock said,
About time someone took the lead on this!

Now, next chance, MetricTime.

Apple did/does it in Snow Leopard.