UK Anti-piracy solicitors shuts down as anti-piracy case looms

Some of you may remember some time ago a story that was widely circulated concerning UK law firm ACS Law and their activities with UK net users where demands were made for payment for allegedly downloaded content. Now that same firm is in hot water itself, when 23 users chose to fight the cases and take their pursuers to court.

The firm, and its "go-between" MediaCAT, is alleged to have bullied customers of ISPs by issuing speculative invoices for the allegedly downloaded content. They have chosen to try and avoid judicial scrutiny of the cases by winding up their respective companies. The action was taken just before ACS was due to appear before the London Patents County Court, which many observers believed it was likely to lose.

The woes of the firm are set to continue as the partners face a disciplinary hearing from their governing body over the letters that were issued to consumers and the general conduct of the firm as a whole. 

Judge Briss QC, who is presiding over the case is set to make a ruling in the case on February 8. The respondents in the action have indicated that they will pursue ACS Law for costs in the case and even counter-sue for allegedly harassing them. 

Briss has been reluctant to drop the case as ACS have demanded pointing out that the litigants seem reluctant for the claims to come under any judicial scrutiny. The case continues.

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12 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

Nice until the next 2 bit law company tries to cash in. If you ever get a letter from a law firm regarding copyright ignore it, they will try twice maybe three times. They try to pin it on you when you flap with all their legal mumbo jumbo. They have nothing on you until you admit it!!

I hope the so called "pirates" win; at least they're not in complete dishonor like the debt collectors, who are accusing people of owing them something by requiring money for stuff.

s1k3sT said,
I hope the so called "pirates" win; at least they're not in complete dishonor like the debt collectors, who are accusing people of owing them something by requiring money for stuff.

I hope they win but then again I know you. You feel everybody owes you. :-/

Leroy Jethro Gibbs said,

I hope they win but then again I know you. You feel everybody owes you. :-/

You know me? Doubtful...

I don't accuse anyone of owing me anything, if working for free doesn't prove that I don't know what can...

s1k3sT said,
I hope the so called "pirates" win; at least they're not in complete dishonor like the debt collectors, who are accusing people of owing them something by requiring money for stuff.

Ridlas said,
Pirates 1
Government 0

It's not necessarily just pirates. Alot of the people receiving these letters were completely innocent and were scared into paying to avoid court. Ironically, if they had opted to go to court, the cases would have vanished. As is the situation now.

Ridlas said,
Pirates 1
Government 0

This was nothing to do with the government, it was a certain lawyer using fear to get people to payout.

The government is completely against this kind of action. They actually advise people to write saying they are innocent (provided they are innocent) and do not communicate any more according to a statement by the House of Lords.

Ridlas said,
Pirates 1
Government 0

It's not just pirates that have been caught in the midst of this company. I myself received a letter from them, and I pay for everything I download/stream what I don't want to buy using services like Spotify. In fact, I'd never even heard of the movie that they insisted I had downloaded, and the Be broadband connection that had apparently "been used to infringe" is quite simply my backup line, and is only ever used if my router detects that my cable connection has died.

I sent them a letter explaining the above to them, via my solicitor, attaching an invoice for his time and the cost of sending the letter. I believe they actually paid his invoice in the end (unlike them, he was actually a real solicitor ).