UK cinemas ban Google Glass

Last week, Google announced the availability of Glass in the United Kingdom, marking the first launch of the wearable device outside of the US. Those purchasing the device in the UK for £1000 GBP will get the newest model of Glass, featuring double the RAM of the previous version. 

While some businesses - including British ones, like Virgin Atlantic Airways - have embraced Glass, not all organizations are quite so pleased to see the device in action. For example, some café and restaurant owners have banned it from their premises, and earlier this year, a movie theater in Columbus, Ohio, called Homeland Security agents to deal with a man wearing Google Glass while watching a film. 

There have been no examples of British cinemas calling the cops on Glass-wearers yet, but as The Independent reports, UK cinema chains are nonetheless banning the device. The Cinema Exhibitors' Association, which claims to represent 90% of UK cinema operators, has said that "customers will be requested not to wear these into cinema auditoriums, whether the film is playing or not." Cinema chain Vue said that its customers would be asked to remove Glass "as soon as the lights dim". 

Even so, Google Glass is probably one of the worst devices to use to record a movie surreptitiously. For a start, Google says that Glass can only record video for around 45 minutes before it completely drains the battery, and the limited amount of onboard storage presents another issue.

Additionally, both the image sensor and microphone are hardly suited to this kind of recording, and let's face it, you're extremely unlikely to be able to keep your head still enough through the movie to not completely ruin the video anyway. On top of all this, the display remains illuminated during recording, so it's not like you'd even be able to keep a low profile in a dark room. 

It's likely, however, that cinema chains are simply laying down the groundwork for the future, anticipating that Glass - and similar devices still to come - will improve with time, and that it makes sense to get users accustomed to the idea of a ban sooner rather than later. 

Source: The Independent | images via Google

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I can't believe some cinema called Homeland Security about this wouldn't the local PD have been a better choice talk about overkill.... bit like using an thermo nuclear device to blow a tree stump when a 1/8lb block of c4 would have sufficed

It seems like all of the problems surrounding Glass could be solved by Google releasing a version that doesn't have a camera.

I have no business in whether people want for some reason try to record a whole movie with the Google Glass (which they'd fail to do with decent quality anyway, and they'd run out of battery long before the ending) but if the display lights up that's distracting.

I hate when some moron feels like reaching his phone and checking his whatsapp, being taken out of the movie by a perfectly visible rectangle of light.
If you really need to check something then at least try to hide it a bit, don't hold it right in front of your face.

The lengths they go... It's funny. Are they seriously thinking enough will watch a Google Glass movie and then never ever watch it again in a better format, so that this will cause a signficant loss of revenue?

So they ban the one device that doesn't have the battery life nor resolution to adequately copy the movie? Jesus-tapdancing-Christ, people should really get their paranoia checked out!

Nogib said,
So they ban the one device that doesn't have the battery life nor resolution to adequately copy the movie? Jesus-tapdancing-Christ, people should really get their paranoia checked out!

What would justify the use of google glass in cinema ? There's no legitimate use.

bigmehdi said,

What would justify the use of google glass in cinema ? There's no legitimate use.

There's no legitimate use to justify bringing in a cellphone either but they aren't nazis about those!

Nogib said,

There's no legitimate use to justify bringing in a cellphone either but they aren't nazis about those!

Uh...yes there is? If an emergency crops up back home or one of my servers at my work place melts down I want to know about it as soon as it occurs.

Bigkaye said,
no. i watched csi. type enhance enough into the video editor and you'll get a crisp image.

yeah csi. You can enlarge any picture 1000x, and it still remain sharp and detailed.

> On top of all this, the display remains illuminated during recording, so it's not like you'd even be able to keep a low profile in a dark room.

It is android. Nobody can stop you from modding it so that the display doesn't light up etc.

If all other devices with a camera are banned in cinemas, then why not the glass?

P.S. I never understood why anyone would want to watch such crap quality recordings.

If I want to text away on my phone to my hearts content I'm free to. Phones aren't outright banned in cinemas.

doing so in a cinema is just being down right rude to the other patrons who've paid good money to watch the movie none of whom wish to be distracted by your phones screen flashing on everytime you get a txt msg or a FB notification over here in NZ we are asked to turn our phones off for the duration of the movie and everyone is happy to do so

Yes it's rude and yes we get asked to turn them off out of politeness. However they aren't banned so I don't understand what your point is.

Well Derp
While it would be a crap video quality and jerky as hell it will improve over time and allow a loop hole which could be exploited later on.

At our local cinema theirs a disabled guy that comes in with a wheelchair that would make Stephen Hawking Jealous. It has two screens on it and loads of bespoke equipment. They also gets prime seat near the front.

Obviously he's not but I always imagined fitting a Solid State Drive and Go Pro would be relatively trivial and would go completely unnoticed.

he may already be doing that, you might want to get on that, I mean, people might be walking in the way and making his camrip unwatchable /s

How is the front "prime" seat. The best seats are generally from the middle and a few rows back. Granted no wheelchair can use anything but the front anyway, but they're pretty much the worst seats.

Yeah. The front rows aren't the best. My best friend is legally blind, so whenever I go to the movies with her (most of the time TBH) we're in one of the front rows. It's not ideal for me, but she wouldn't be able to watch the movie at all further back.

-adrian- said,
Why? are you not allowed to hold your phone in the cinema ? pretty sure I can have phone with me in the cinema

You're not allowed to film the screen with your phone, no. Same as Glass.
"as soon as the lights dim"

MikeChipshop said,

You're not allowed to film the screen with your phone, no. Same as Glass.
"as soon as the lights dim"

If the movie is running and the phone is directed to the screen, you'll be asked to leave or worse if they actually catch you filming.

-adrian- said,
Why? are you not allowed to hold your phone in the cinema ? pretty sure I can have phone with me in the cinema

Most cinemas have quite advanced monitoring. If they see you're recording you can bet you'll be out of there after a few minutes.

good, stop the masses from recording a movie with their glasses! (by 'masses', I mean the one shady lookin' guy that would actually try it)