UK Court orders blocking of more "illegal" websites

Following the decision by the High Court of the UK last year to block The Pirate Bay and its known alternative addresses, the court in the UK has added three more sites to the list and are requiring a number of "major" ISPs to block them henceforth.

The BBC reports that the ISPs will be required to stop their users from accessing Kickass Torrents, H33T and Fenopy.

Music industry group the British Phonographic Industry (BPI) said the sites infringed copyright on a "significant scale".

Opponents to the decision have long argued that such decisions have little effect, and in some cases such as the blocking of The Pirate Bay last year, can actually have the opposite effect where traffic not only returned to normal, but actually increased after the ruling.

Speaking after Thursdays decision BPI chief executive Geoff Taylor said:

The growth of digital music in the UK is held back by a raft of illegal businesses commercially exploiting music online without permission.

Blocking illegal sites helps ensure that the legal digital market can grow and labels can continue to sign and develop new talent.

The BBC report also pointed out that a market research firm NPD has suggested that there had been a large reduction in the number of users illegally downloading music, with users instead favouring legal options like streaming site Spotify. However, their report did fail to mention that services like Spotify has only become a viable legal option since recently and has still yet to roll out in other countries.

Source: BBC

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great job... can just get better with the UK leaving the EU.. Maybe they can link together with the Iran intranet. Long live censorship. just don't fight the cause of the problems

The problem is, the BPI doesn't seem to know the difference between pirates.

Real Pirates: Live near Somalia
Knock-Off Nigel Pirates: People who download DVDs to sell out the back of their car at a car boot sale.
People Who Just Want to Watch Shows: Use torrent sites to download shows they want to watch because they're not out in the UK yet, or the BBC iPlayer puts crappy restrictions on the content.

I would suggest the majority of people are simply the latter which I fail to see the problem with.

Mr Spoon said,
The problem is, the BPI doesn't seem to know the difference between pirates.

Real Pirates: Live near Somalia
Knock-Off Nigel Pirates: People who download DVDs to sell out the back of their car at a car boot sale.
People Who Just Want to Watch Shows: Use torrent sites to download shows they want to watch because they're not out in the UK yet, or the BBC iPlayer puts crappy restrictions on the content.

I would suggest the majority of people are simply the latter which I fail to see the problem with.


Were you referring to 'Suits'?

I will never buy a CD or DVD again whilst even a fraction of a percent of the profit from it (it's actually much higher) goes to the BP-****ing useless-I. I buy off artist's site that do not have any profit going to the BPI and would hope others do the same.
The BPI is a scummy sham organisation that needs disbanding ASAP.

The growth of digital music in the UK is held back by a raft of illegal businesses commercially exploiting music online without permission.

Nope. Actually, file sharing helps grow "digital music". Whether there is revenue involved is another topic, but it definitely grows that segment.
Blocking illegal sites helps ensure that the legal digital market can grow and labels can continue to sign and develop new talent.

So this is not possible today? It's not happening right now? You aren't making any sense.

If my preferred US late night talk shows were available to watch on any non-FTA channel on Sky . . .

Paying in excess of £30 a month, just to be able to watch two US late night talk shows, likely to be
heavily edited, and have ad-breaks every 10 minutes or so, would be a waste of £30+ per month,
when the "unauthorised sources" has them completely unedited from the original US broadcast,
and ad-breaks removed for nowt ... the choice is rather obvious. The only downsides to this are
that the shows are often available from a few days or upto a week after the original broadcast,
so I've often got a backlog of about 5-10 shows (sometime more) to watch over a weekend.

I have little or no interest towards anything else available on Sky. I don't follow any sports, and I
can get almost all the movies I want from the online streaming services like Netflix or LoveFilm.

I know sky isn't free, but you couldn't use it as an argument

I'd never use Sky neither, monopoly scum

Here we go again..............
I know, lets just ban the internet, and do all the things that would make V or Equilibrium plausible while we're at it
(Although I partially agree with trying to combat piracy, I also know to take things posted in my stride, it's just another medium that gets abused)

FTA? Guessing free-to-air, are they available with sky etc? If they are you have no argument unfortunately, if not there not you have a great argument

Dan~ said,

FTA? Guessing free-to-air, are they available with sky etc? If they are you have
no argument unfortunately, if not there not you have a great argument


FTA is free-to-air, yes. Sky is not free-to-air. AFAIK, the two specific US late night talk shows I like
to watch are not even currently available via any subscription TV channels, let alone FTA ones.

I wouldn't subscribe to Sky even if they were available on subscription based TV ... !

If there was a way I could watch certain US late night talk shows, I wouldn't bother to download them
via torrents. None of them are available on "FTA" TV channels over here, so I have no other option
but to download them from various unauthorised sources such as torrent sites.

I called PPUK last year to ask about running in my area just generally about putting my name on the ballot rather than actually campaigning to get the party name out, they said they wanted someone to get things going around the area really because nobody close to me is running for the pirate party. I think I may actually call again when I'm done with uni and just do what it takes to get on the ballot!

I'm rarely going to buy a DVD of a show, or watch the adverts, so they are not losing any money from me if I happen to rush to download it before it's shown on TV.

This just annoys me more than anything. So if I can't watch it spoiler free, then I'll just not watch the show. That means I'm less likely to buy merchandise for it too. Oh well They will just lose viewers with this in the long run.

They'll never win and I do really hate BPI, nothing comes out of the UK (music wise) worth protecting anymore.

Say I bought an album the band receives a tiny amount, if I go watch them live then they receive a bigger amount.

So by me downloading an album (which I don't) isn't going to hurt the band in the slightest, when will be the day when bands don't form because they won't get any money? Never is the answer, they will always exist with or without BPI, RIAA etc.

BPI always banging on about how downloading is affecting sales etc, well go on there website and there banging on about adels album selling 100million copies, errr so downloading isn't affecting your sales then

It'll only get worse . F**k the BPI! Just like the RIAA in the States, many artists in the UK hate the BPI as they realise they are not out to protect the rights of the artists, those scumbags just want to get some money for their useless dying corporation!

So banning one site made piracy increase, maybe you just shouldn't block sites... Nah **** that, lets block more, that will make it better.

You don't even have to use TOR or any proxy service to access TPB. Last year they made all meta data into magnet links which means any site can mirror their magnets whilst hosting very little data. Genius. Pretty much any site can act as a clone of TPB which means even if the original is censored, other sites can harbour that information for you!

Anarkii said,
Booooooooooo
I guess tor and proxy service sales are going through the roof in the UK now then!

The biggest problem we have now is that the bar for the law has been set. Companies can force restrictions on us users in what ever way they see fit and as long as they can convince the judge that blocking a site is for protection. While the judge may or may not even be technically minded enough to understand the implications of what they're doing, right now the law has shown that blocking sites 'works' but it'll only be a matter of time before judges are told they need additional services blocked to help combat piracy.

We'll then see other restrictions happening to our internet.
We could see enforced restrictions on our open ports use, or even all your port 80 via transparent proxy setup to filter out and alter magnet:// a href link to a blocked notice site.
That'd sounds like a good idea for the judge and it just might happen.
However, from having transparent cache systems in the past enforced upon me I know, they don't work and often fail causing problems with almost every website when they do.

If we have common torrent ports blocked, as time progresses our ISPs will cotton on to this and start blocking additional services and may even introduce their own transparent proxy services and caged internet tunnels on cheaper service plans.
Imagine for a moment where your internet is really only a proxy itself to webpages.
Want to play a online multiplayer game that your ISP doesn't support? Upgrade to premium and pay £5 extra a month to unlock game services... yes that will happen if we're not careful.

When you make a dedicated service that's prim objective is piracy, you need to expect black-lash.

Makes me sad when corporations can say jump and our government says how high...

Maybe if the BPI got with the times and embraced new technology then piracy would become a thing of the past.

That was my point with the closing paragraph, services like Spotify (and others) are way better now than the non existent variants of it, say, three years plus ago.. but when people follow shows in the US and see they aren't going to be available for months after the US broadcast, what'cha gonna do?? I'm not advocating piracy btw.. Just pointing out why some people might do it.

TheLegendOfMart said,
Makes me sad when corporations can say jump and our government says how high...

Maybe if the BPI got with the times and embraced new technology then piracy would become a thing of the past.

But it is not governments its courts, quite different.

Agree second point.

Neobond said,
but when people follow shows in the US and see they aren't going to be available for months after the US broadcast, what'cha gonna do??.

Yep exactly. If HBO/AMC etc gave me a way to pay to see the latest Breaking Bad/Dexter/The Walking Dead I would happily. Right now not anyway to see the latest series without using a torrent. And if you don't torrent? Be ready for it to be spoiled by people talking about it by the time you wait for it arrive on disc (if it ever does) over here.

xstex said,

Yep exactly. If HBO/AMC etc gave me a way to pay to see the latest Breaking Bad/Dexter/The Walking Dead I would happily. Right now not anyway to see the latest series without using a torrent. And if you don't torrent? Be ready for it to be spoiled by people talking about it by the time you wait for it arrive on disc (if it ever does) over here.

I couldn't agree more, however I can see where the issue is.

Before a UK or European TV company pays millions for the rights to show they want to see if it is successful. That is the primary reason for delay especially with new shows.

The only answer I can think of is having private viewing of some kind.

stevember said,

I couldn't agree more, however I can see where the issue is.

Before a UK or European TV company pays millions for the rights to show they want to see if it is successful. That is the primary reason for delay especially with new shows.

The only answer I can think of is having private viewing of some kind.

I could understand argument for the brand new shows not coming to UK, but with shows such as Breaking Bad on its 5th series, Dexter on its 7th, and walking dead on it's 3rd.. These TV shows are massive hits.

Even the likes of The Big Bang Theory is a week delayed for the UK, and these companies have facebook pages that promote the shows that people all around the world 'like'. With posts offering up trailers and then recaps of the shows that not only can we not watch the trailers because we're not from the USA(blocked from their website), but we get told what's happening in the shows before we've had a chance to see them.

So even if we wanted to pay for the content via a USA subscription, we can't even login to (nor access) their website to view the webcast version paid for. It seems crazy that given that people are wanting to pay, they'd just telling them to go away and still advertise to the fans what they're missing out on.
Remember here, that these are fans of the show, they'd be more then happy to pay for it if they could.

The pirates that won't. Well, it doesn't matter how much you force them to try and buy, they're still not going to buy it.

Neobond said,
That was my point with the closing paragraph, services like Spotify (and others) are way better now than the non existent variants of it, say, three years plus ago.. but when people follow shows in the US and see they aren't going to be available for months after the US broadcast, what'cha gonna do?? I'm not advocating piracy btw.. Just pointing out why some people might do it.

Slowly but surely, the internet will turn into pay per view just like DTH services.

stevember said,
I can see where the issue is.

Before a UK or European TV company pays millions for the rights to show they want to see if it is successful. That is the primary reason for delay especially with new shows.

As already stated, that doesn't explain the delay for existing series. Media companies should stop targeting US launches and should seek to build a worldwide audience - that would also mean that shows that aren't successful in the US can continue on if there is a large international following. There really is no excuse, particularly now that streaming services are starting to take off and so much advertising is done online.

sagum said,

I could understand argument for the brand new shows not coming to UK, but with shows such as Breaking Bad on its 5th series, Dexter on its 7th, and walking dead on it's 3rd.. These TV shows are massive hits.

I DID say new shows.

Week delay is better than it used to be, not perfect granted.

BTW I get most mine from PB even if only a week.

stevember said,
Before a UK or European TV company pays millions for the rights to show they want to see if it is successful. That is the primary reason for delay especially with new shows.

Easy solution: broadcast it in the US and make it available online via paid streaming or iTunes elsewhere.

a0me said,

Easy solution: broadcast it in the US and make it available online via paid streaming or iTunes elsewhere.

They already do that, but it's still restricted to north America markets. Even if we wanted to paid to watch it streamed, we can't.