Usability expert Jakob Nielsen: Windows 8 UI is disappointing

There has been much debate over the "Modern" user interface of Windows 8 before and after its launch in late October. Today, one of the leading experts in web usability, Jakob Nielsen, took the time to conduct a study of the Windows 8 UI and called his final results "disappointing".

Nielsen said in a post on his blog that he invited 12 "experienced" PC owners to try out Windows 8 for his study, both on regular PCs as well as on Microsoft's Surface tablet, which runs under Windows RT. He felt that having both the "Modern" UI and the desktop interface was a problem for a number of reasons, including switching between the two set ups and its users having to remember which UI to go to for certain features.

While Windows 8 does support running two apps, with one in a "snapped view" at the same time, Nielsen said that his test subjects were unable to get this feature to work. He added:

The single-window strategy works well on tablets and is required on a small phone screen. But with a big monitor and dozens of applications and websites running simultaneously, a high-end PC user definitely benefits from the ability to see multiple windows at the same time. Indeed, the most important web use cases involve collecting, comparing, and choosing among several web pages, and such tasks are much easier with several windows when you have the screen space to see many things at once.

He also felt that the "Modern" UI cut down on information that is presented to the Windows 8 user, and that the touch screen gestures can lead to a number of user errors. He also feels the Charms feature is not well implemented.

In his conclusion Nielsen says:

I have nothing against Microsoft. I happen to think that Windows 7 is a good product and that Windows 8 is a misguided one. I derived these conclusions from first principles of human–computer interaction theory and from watching users in our new research. One doesn't have to hate or love a company in order to analyze its UI designs. I'll stay with Win7 the next few years and hope for better times with Windows 9. One great thing about Microsoft is that they do have a history of correcting their mistakes.

Source: Jakob Nielsen | Image via Microsoft

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It's the JIGSAW interface of Windows 8. It is awful. Well, this part is in metro, that isn't. FULL SCREEN APPS. THE GOD AWFUL START SCREEN. It's like someone took the worst parts of a mobile operating system and stuck them on a desktop counterpart. Not to mention, the in-system advertising. Jesus... That is awful. A lot of these metro apps should be only for a mobile device. A lot of people who use Windows 7, and love it, have desktops. They want a desktop equivalent. NOT THE METRO MOBILE VERSION. Did Microsoft think no one was going to notice that they just wrote one version of quintessential programs and tried to tailor it to desktop computers? Is Microsoft just trying to be cheap? I should be paid for how many times I've complained about every thing that is wrong with Windows 8. Are the developers too out of touch? Out of touch for a touchscreen UI... There is a great joke there. The App Changer Window. The WiFi Window. They are coded to look like Metro on the desktop. WTF?

Microsoft needs to focus on what is essential. Make desktop equivalents to the new emerging apps that are becoming essential. Messaging. Notifications. Contacts. SEPARATE METRO FROM WINDOWS ALL TOGETHER. MAKE A DESKTOP APP FOR THEIR STORE. THE END.

It's the JIGSAW interface of Windows 8. It is awful. Well, this part is in metro, that isn't. FULL SCREEN APPS. THE GOD AWFUL START SCREEN. It's like someone took the worst parts of a mobile operating system and stuck them on a desktop counterpart. Not to mention, the in-system advertising. Jesus... That is awful. A lot of these metro apps should be only for a mobile device. A lot of people who use Windows 7, and love it, have desktops. They want a desktop equivalent. NOT THE METRO MOBILE VERSION. Did Microsoft think no one was going to notice that they just wrote one version of quintessential programs and tried to tailor it to desktop computers? Is Microsoft just trying to be cheap? I should be paid for how many times I've complained about every thing that is wrong with Windows 8. Are the developers too out of touch? Out of touch for a touchscreen UI... There is a great joke there. The App Changer Window. The WiFi Window. They are coded to look like Metro on the desktop. WTF?

Microsoft needs to focus on what is essential. Make desktop equivalents to the new emerging apps that are becoming essential. Messaging. Notifications. Contacts. SEPARATE METRO FROM WINDOWS ALL TOGETHER. MAKE A DESKTOP APP FOR THEIR STORE. THE END.

Agree 100% been saying ti all along in my last 50 neowin posts.

Windows 8 is perfect for tablets.

for a desktop it dosent cut it!
It makes life harder not easier

I agree with this. Having used Windows Phone 7 for 2 years, which has an amazing UI and makes all of the features very accessible, I believe Windows 8 is a very shallow attempt to bring Metro UI to desktop and tablet users. It was poorly done, and I feel very disappointed in how this product came out. Even on my Surface, I find parts of the UI very inconvenient, and sometimes inconsistent.

Metro UI was about making features more accessible, universally easy to understand, and getting things done in as few steps as possible. Windows 8 adds more steps to get things done, hides features away, and its features are less discover-able. I feel like the Windows team looked at Metro and all they saw was fonts, infographics, and live tiles; when the biggest part of Metro is setting up easy paths for getting from here to there. It's based on Airport terminals, after all.

If you look at how difficult it is to do a simple copy/paste on a Surface compared to a Windows Phone, you'll see what I mean. The whole process from fumbling to select the text, and then holding down until you get the context menu, which half the time doesn't show up on the first try, is contrived. Selecting text and doing copy/pastes on WP is so easy and straightforward, why can't it be like this on Windows 8? Also, the on-screen keyboard has **** auto-correct, when Windows Phone has it nailed.

I've been using it since it launched, so I know how to use most power-user features now, but I still find myself frustrated with hidden toolbars in the full screen apps. I hate how app settings are hidden in the settings charm. Would it have been so difficult to copy Windows Phone's toolbar ellipse?

They were sorely lacking in attention to detail with this.

Don't get me wrong though, I still use Windows 8 on my desktop, laptop and Surface, but I feel it really needs some polishing.

The comments on this article are amazingly retarded. I usually don't comment due to the level of retardedness, but this is beyond belief. The article (not the short quotes here, the actual article) is a long and detailed analysis that makes several well-argued points based on both classical UX theory and empirical data. The comments on this page are a bunch of pitiful and ineffective one-line ad hominems aiming to destroy the credibility of the author rather than provide counter-evidence to his points.

Either this forum has become a bunch of angry teenagers or I must lose faith in humanity.

One problem is that a lot of people (including myself) can't stand the look of the metro ui... It just looks & feels dull.... I want a computer OS, not a DVD player rip-off menu interface...
Windows 8 is already the WinME of the 21st century..
I hope microsoft will wake up and release a whole new OS asap, not just a patched win7 with an ugly touch overlay interface...

WTF are you people on? Jacob Nielsen developed usability heuristics for user interface design in early 90's, those heuristics are still the most used.

This 'usability' expert is also an oxygen consumption expert, and a caloric intake expert, and a 'con Neowin idiots' expert...

He has no background on usability or OS models or interface designs or interaction designs and even his 'web site design expertise' would be laughed out of a 101 graphic design course.


Neowin, this is where you are going, really? Maybe it is time I dump some money into one of your competitors, so people don't get the enquirer version of information and assume it has credibility.

I don't want to quit you, but I will...

thenetavenger said,
his 'web site design expertise' would be laughed out of a 101 graphic design course.

So the topic is about a usability designer, and you manage to confuse that with graphical design.

So much for your credibility.

I work as a Microsoft consultant. I configure and deploy Windows Server infrastructures mostly based on Active Directory, Lync Server and Exchange Server, and I personally use Windows 7. I have worked with Microsoft technologies for MANY years, but I am NOT a fanboy (luckily). Microsoft has had MANY flaws but they have fixed them.

Personally I don't want to use Windows 8 on my laptop/desktop. I have the license keys and media available for free from technet/msdn, and I have had that since RTM. I still don't want to use Win8 personally. I love the new UI of Office 2013 and Lync 2013, and I love the changes that has been made to Exchange 2013 and Hyper-V 3.0... BUT - Windows 8 is flawed. Even more so than Windows Vista was. Sure you can work your way around the inconsistent user experience but why bother when I can continue using Windows 7 which I am perfectly happy with?

The biggest problem with Windows 8 is the fact that for DESKTOP users there is absolutely NO REASON to upgrade from Windows 7!

bidz said,
I work as a Microsoft consultant. I configure and deploy Windows Server infrastructures mostly based on Active Directory, Lync Server and Exchange Server, and I personally use Windows 7. I have worked with Microsoft technologies for MANY years, but I am NOT a fanboy (luckily). Microsoft has had MANY flaws but they have fixed them.

Personally I don't want to use Windows 8 on my laptop/desktop. I have the license keys and media available for free from technet/msdn, and I have had that since RTM. I still don't want to use Win8 personally. I love the new UI of Office 2013 and Lync 2013, and I love the changes that has been made to Exchange 2013 and Hyper-V 3.0... BUT - Windows 8 is flawed. Even more so than Windows Vista was. Sure you can work your way around the inconsistent user experience but why bother when I can continue using Windows 7 which I am perfectly happy with?

The biggest problem with Windows 8 is the fact that for DESKTOP users there is absolutely NO REASON to upgrade from Windows 7!

Access to an 'information' screen instead of a static desktop?
Access to a lot of fairly nice Apps that do not run on Windows 7?
Faster performance?
Less RAM consumption?
New video model with enhanced GP-GPU?
CPU - GPU hybrid computing - send CPU calls through GPU - send GPU calls through CPU?


Anyone that 'seriously' uses the new start screen will feel the loss of the information and access it provides when moving to Windows 7.

It is obvious you have not 'seriously' ran Windows 8.

I was right there with after the developer preview, and had a time of WTH is Microsoft doing, until I actually installed it as a main OS on one computer at my home. Within a few days I found the loss of Apps and information when working on Windows 7 systems noticeable. My family found it noticeable too, and before long everyone was insisting on Windows 8 everywhere.

The other fallacy is that by moving to Windows 8 you are giving up something. This isn't true, and you gain a lot of nice features, especially if you are power user/tech/developer that is a keyboard person, as the shortcuts and navigation in Windows 8 on the new UI and the desktop is a marginal improvement.

thenetavenger said,

Access to an 'information' screen instead of a static desktop?


When I work on a desktop I work on a desktop. I am not interested in having non-relevant information presented to me then. That is a nice feature for tablets but not for workstations.

Access to a lot of fairly nice Apps that do not run on Windows 7?

Which apps? The only thing I do on my workstation is use RDP, Office (with Visio), Spotify, VMware Workstation, Hyper-V, Firefox, Lync, Jabber Movie, CUPS, Evernote, One Note, Notepad++, SecureCRT, Wireshark, Lightroom and Photoshop. None of these apps are suited for tablet use, except maybe the browser, lync and jabber.
Faster performance?
A few percents is not noticeable on a i7 Quad Core CPU.
Less RAM consumption?
A few hundred megs of more free ram is not noticeable with 32GB memory.
New video model with enhanced GP-GPU?
I never play games, and the only application I use that actually utilize the GPU is Photoshop which works blazingly fast with Windows 7.
CPU - GPU hybrid computing - send CPU calls through GPU - send GPU calls through CPU?
Does Photoshop or Lightroom support it?

It is obvious you have not 'seriously' ran Windows 8.
Yes I have. Both for corporate and personal use, in VM's and on dedicated workstations.

I am actually more attracted to the latest OS X version than Windows 8. And I am not the only one... Many Microsoft consultants are walking around with Macs these days. Why? Well... I can't answer that. But as a system consultant - the only thing you actually need locally is a RDP client, and OS X has that... Nobody in my company (a large IT consultant company that sells, maintains and supports solutions to big corporations) wants to use Win8, and there is an increasing demand of BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) in all tech businesses nowadays... And guess why? Because nobody wants those stinkpads anymore, they want to buy a Mac and be able to bring it to work and use it.

Thanks to Windows 8's inconsistent and confusing UI design even more people are considering moving away from Microsoft as a supplier of the end-user operating system all together, and only use Microsoft products in the infrastructure (Exchange, Lync, SharePoint, SQL, Hyper-V and so on).

Edited by bidz, Nov 19 2012, 9:55pm :

So I see, you're just a show off, not a normal user.

Then allows the rest of us ~non-consultants~ to enjoy what Win8 can squeeze out of our *weaker* machines, will ya!?

Oh, just to let you know, you are really sounding like you should just give up MS consultant title if you fail to understand how Win8 can help your customers. Get it? MS consultant holding out on Win8 because he can't wrap his head around it is no a real consultant?!

bidz said,

When I work on a desktop I work on a desktop. I am not interested in having non-relevant
information presented to me then. That is a nice feature for tablets but not for workstations.
[...]

Ulyses said,
So I see, you're just a show off, not a normal user.

Then allows the rest of us ~non-consultants~ to enjoy what Win8 can squeeze out of our *weaker* machines, will ya!?

Oh, just to let you know, you are really sounding like you should just give up MS consultant title if you fail to understand how Win8 can help your customers. Get it? MS consultant holding out on Win8 because he can't wrap his head around it is no a real consultant?!

A show-off? how retarded are you? My computer is supplied by my employer, and I need those specs because I use the computer as a lab on the go as well. I often virtualize a complete SMB environment on the computer, and I also virtualize Cisco TelePresence products (VCS and TMS mainly), Lync deployments, AD, Exchange... That is fairly normal you know.

The MS technology most system consultants work with has nothing to do with the desktop OS. You don't need Win8 to work with Lync, Exchange, SharePoint, AD or anything. I don't care at all about single users and what they use, I care about the infrastructure in the backend that keeps a company alive. Clients are clients, and they can be anything as long as the client is able to runt he required applications to use the infrastructure.

As of today, there is NOTHING that requires Windows 8 to work. And that is kind of my point.

I am not a MS evangelist like the lot of you guys hanging around here on Neowin. I believe in giving truthful and objective advice to our customers based on what is best FOR THEM and not based on what we can sell. If a customer wants a professional video conferencing system I would never advice them to get Lync since Cisco's TelePresence products are far better in every regard for pure video conferencing use, for example.

I am certified in a bunch of MS technologies, but I am also certified in a bunch of Cisco technologies, and I also enjoy VMware products. Try looking at the "bigger picture" and you'll see that there are strengths and shortcomings in every camp (Microsoft, Cisco, Apple, VMware, Oracle, Google, etc, etc, etc). The key thing is to use the strengths of them all and dump the weaknesses of them all as well.

As of today Win8 is viewed upon in the same way as Windows Vista was by the corporate world. And that is a fact.

bidz said,
I work as a Microsoft consultant. I configure and deploy Windows Server infrastructures mostly based on Active Directory, Lync Server and Exchange Server, and I personally use Windows 7. I have worked with Microsoft technologies for MANY years, but I am NOT a fanboy (luckily). Microsoft has had MANY flaws but they have fixed them.

Personally I don't want to use Windows 8 on my laptop/desktop. I have the license keys and media available for free from technet/msdn, and I have had that since RTM. I still don't want to use Win8 personally. I love the new UI of Office 2013 and Lync 2013, and I love the changes that has been made to Exchange 2013 and Hyper-V 3.0... BUT - Windows 8 is flawed. Even more so than Windows Vista was. Sure you can work your way around the inconsistent user experience but why bother when I can continue using Windows 7 which I am perfectly happy with?

The biggest problem with Windows 8 is the fact that for DESKTOP users there is absolutely NO REASON to upgrade from Windows 7!


Let me say that I agree with your statements. Truthfully, there is nothing compelling or worthwhile in upgrading to Windows 8 on a desktop from a productivity standpoint. Yes, there are improvements under the hood in the basic OS, but it's the interface that brings everything to a screeching, screaming halt.

I have tried several times to give Windows 8 the benefit of the doubt, even going as far as buying the upgrade and installing it on a blank drive. But I will continue to use Windows 7 for my primary OS, because I want to *DO* things like photo-manipulation and graphics work, and in order to do that you HAVE to be in the Desktop, not that God-awful abomination known as Metro/Modern/Whatever UI. Anything, and I mean *ANYTHING* is vastly better than what Microsoft has pushed upon the unsuspecting public, and that's speaking as someone who has used Windows since the original incarnations, along with Max OS X, KDE, Gnome, XFCE, NeXT, CDE and a wide range of other user interfaces. This is a massive step backwards for Microsoft, and will likely hurt them in the long run.

I love how geeks proclaim how stupid others are for not instantly knowing about hidden or obscure features of an OS. I promise you the vast majority of people don't know about most of the features of w7 after years of use. The point is, it should be intuitive or at least pay SOMEONE ELSE to do a god damn 5 minute video walking people through things. Microsoft Help, lol, the absolute worst POS from day one to today. All of this would just be a band aid for a poorly designed GUI anyway, but it would at least help some get started with something new.

Read his other stuff, and you'll realize he's just like most of the other usability experts out there: a bunch of fluff with nothing really useful to add.

Good UI for Tablets and Phones...bad idea to bolt it onto the Desktop enviroment. The no compromise OS is all compromise all the time.

Walrush said,
Good UI for Tablets and Phones...bad idea to bolt it onto the Desktop enviroment. The no compromise OS is all compromise all the time.

Really, name ONE thing you cannot do on Windows 8 that you can do on Windows 7... Show me a compromise, because in doing a lot of testing and research, to support 10 of thousands of client systems, our teams haven't found A SINGLE significant compromise yet.

...And rethinking of the Start Screen, which is just a bigger Start Menu is NOT a compromise, as it has all the same functionality and adds new features.

"The situation is much worse on regular PCs, particularly for knowledge workers doing productivity tasks in the office. This used to be Microsoft's core audience, and it has now thrown the old customer base under the bus by designing an operating system that removes a powerful PC's benefits in order to work better on smaller devices."

Absolute idiot. Does no one realize the desktop is still there? He acknowledges it but still seems to forget its there. I'm on a Win8 desktop machine and it works just fine. Take what he says with an entire salt shaker. He also just wants your moneys.

Oh come on!

The only obvious thing is the now ridiculous study he links too at the bottom of the screen, regarding mobile experience.

I don't even know what one could "Learn More" from that study, but I've come across it last year when in an argument about responsive web design I was also being introduced by one of the discussion participants to exactly that study.

I was pretty much blown away how Jacob Nielsen can talk about UI and UX and try to sell it's ideas from a site lacking any sense of engagement or orientation. You never know where you are or what you're writing, everything is the same nothingness there. Nevermind that the site can't hold well smartphone or tablet users, desktop users are not getting any decent UX fro it.

He seems to be trying a blackmail scheme here: buy my studies, or pay me, or I'll let my few gullible followers know that your product is the devil.

He's got not a single clue what he's talking about, but he's sure of it all. Now, Mr. Jakob Nielsen, just STFU, please, thank you.

*sets salad aside* Ahem.... This article is complete 100% ****. His so called "experienced" PC users couldn't even get snap to work? They are obviously not "experienced" more like casual users to me. Snap isn't hard to do just move it to the left or right side of the screen and whamo! I learned how to use most of the things in windows 8(which I never bothered with CP or RP versions) in the first 10 minutes. This article is an abomination to Neowin and the Tech world all together. but articles like this continue to be posted...of nothing but inane observations of "so-called" expert users opinions when they do nothing but whine moan bitch and complain about the start screen and how they don't like this or that with Windows 8.

If they had any sense at all just pin the **** you wanna use to the taskbar or put all your icons back on the desktop like you're back in 1995, better yet the "user" should just get an old IBM and use windows 3.1x

anyway if it were me I'd kill this article with a vengence! Mr. Callaham....You're articles as of late are doing nothing but, starting flame wars between members...please take your time and think about what articles would we like to read and actually have "substance" instead of "I hate windows 8" news.

Edited by TCA, Nov 19 2012, 6:47pm :

TCA said,
*sets salad aside* Ahem.... This article is complete 100% ****. His so called "experienced" PC users couldn't even get snap to work? They are obviously not "experienced" more like casual users to me. Snap isn't hard to do just move it to the left or right side of the screen and whamo! I learned how to use most of the things in windows 8(which I never bothered with CP or RP versions) in the first 10 minutes. This article is an abomination to Neowin and the Tech world all together. but articles like this continue to be posted...of nothing but inane observations of "so-called" expert users opinions when they do nothing but whine moan bitch and complain about the start screen and how they don't like this or that with Windows 8.

If they had any sense at all just pin the **** you wanna use to the taskbar or put all your icons back on the desktop like you're back in 1995, better yet the "user" should just get an old IBM and use windows 3.1x

anyway if it were me I'd kill this article with a vengence! Mr. Callaham....You're articles as of late are doing nothing but, starting flame wars between members...please take your time and think about what articles would we like to read and actually have "substance" instead of "I hate windows 8" news.

I actually believe the article! I work with thousands of computer users in the military and I kid you not, over 90% of those who used it feel the same way as this guys test subjects. It's a fact man, this operating system is not for those who actually work on there computer. Checking email and Facebook is fine, but I'd rather someone take a sledge hammer to my testicles than deal with Windows 8 on my production system.

This guy hit it right on the head. Windows 8 is fine on tablets. Sucks big time on the desktop. Been running it in a Virtual Machine and still ask myself, "what the fack was Microsoft thinking"?

JHBrown said,
This guy hit it right on the head. Windows 8 is fine on tablets. Sucks big time on the desktop. Been running it in a Virtual Machine and still ask myself, "what the fack was Microsoft thinking"?

Another 'running it a VM, so I don't get the usability experience, but will comment anyway because I want to look silly'?

Use it as your main OS for a few hours, where you can use the mouse corners and the intended keystrokes and Windows Key properly, then come back and tell us how it is horrible.

(Here is a hint, you won't, and I know it sounds crazy, but I felt the same way you did when doing preliminary testing in a VM - Unless the VM is designed for Windows 8, and none are, it sucks in a VM. You don't feel the performance, and navigation is horrible. Put Win8 in real use, and it will shame Windows 7 or any other OS. You will find yourself missing the Start Screen full of your sports scores and mail and messages and calendar, even if you don't use any of the new Apps. And you will also miss a lot of the new Apps, especially the news aggregator features and Netflix, etc.)

Unfortunately Jakob Neils forgot one critical aspect and perspective, it is technically impossible to replace fine control with gross control, and expect it to work with same efficiency in every situation. Basically touch can never replace mouse/keyboard, each has a unique advantage area where it will shine and will be used. As an example, managing multiple windows via touch is going to be much difficult than with a mouse. Also applications like CAD will be never effective with touch alone, what ever the UI design.

This is the reason why Windows 8 has both of the options available, and a no compromise option. Nobody has tried it before them but that is the most logical path to go.

Looks like Jakob wants to create some noise, and get attention so the big companies hire his services. Its not thing more than that.

soulxfer said,
Unfortunately Jakob Neils forgot one critical aspect and perspective, it is technically impossible to replace fine control with gross control, and expect it to work with same efficiency in every situation. Basically touch can never replace mouse/keyboard, each has a unique advantage area where it will shine and will be used. As an example, managing multiple windows via touch is going to be much difficult than with a mouse. Also applications like CAD will be never effective with touch alone, what ever the UI design.

This is the reason why Windows 8 has both of the options available, and a no compromise option. Nobody has tried it before them but that is the most logical path to go.

Looks like Jakob wants to create some noise, and get attention so the big companies hire his services. Its not thing more than that.


To me, Windows 8 feels more like a "all compromise" solution, not a "no compromise" one. Desktop users will not be happy with metro. Surface users will hate fiddeling with the desktop on a tiny tablet screen. Microsoft just created Mr Hyde out of the traditional desktop and Metro.

One thing many people do on Neowin is rubbish other people's opinion. A lot of users don't like the new ui and lets face it, the changes are not a natural progression of win 7.

I wish we could have decent educated debate on here a bit more instead of trying to shout each other down.

This is nothing, just wait until a serious number of the general public get a hold of this thing, I can't wait because the sooner the hammer drops the sooner they can fix all the crap that's WRONG with it and we can get back to work with a marginally faster system...actually I don't care, w7 is fine by me, would have been nice to get better performance and features from w8 without all the frustration, but I can certainly keep using w7 until w9...No problem at all.

I derived these conclusions from first principles of human-computer interaction theory

I wonder when people like Neilsen here will realize Microsoft are RE-writing human-computer interaction theory, breaking away from tried and true GUI concepts with a NUI driven approach.

People like this who cite the product as being a failure because it doesn't stand up to an antequated measurement tool need to realize continuing education is a lifelong passion.

Now, let me get Bill Buxton's opinion on the execution of Microsoft's first, Touch-First OS, and then I'll listen.

deadonthefloor said,

I wonder when people like Neilsen here will realize Microsoft are RE-writing human-computer interaction theory, breaking away from tried and true GUI concepts with a NUI driven approach.

Rubbish, Metro isn't even remotely close to an NUI. It's a glorified GUI designed primarily around touch-based interaction.

Touch itself might be a more naturalistic form of interaction, but in terms of the UI itself - it's just as much a GUI as Windows 1 was.

deadonthefloor said,

big fat tiles for big fat fingers
feels natural to me.

I don't think you really understand what an NUI is.

The fact you mention tiles clearly proves that the UI is not invisible to the user, and by very definition - not a natural user interface.

Athernar said,

I don't think you really understand what an NUI is.

The fact you mention tiles clearly proves that the UI is not invisible to the user, and by very definition - not a natural user interface.

Ironically, you are also shoving the definition outside of conventional limits. Even 'talking' to a computer based on your definition is no longer a NUI, as you are telling an artificial device to perform an action, which is no longer 'natural'.

In a world of buttons that control our world, we have to be a bit more liberal about the migration of what a NUI is and how it has evolved from people that grew up before computers were in common to where we have one in our pocket.

To you touching a Tile may not be natural, but you also did not grow up in an era where your coffee table was a massive image touch based screen, and that is where NUI has moved us to better interactions, but also is redefining a generation of people what a NUI is.

How about this... What instrument is a NUI? Piano, Harmonica, Guitar? Many people that create Synth software would tell you they all are; however it wasn't that long ago that they were not a part of our 'natural' world. So then what is NUI instrument, beating a rock? Again that is not a NUI either, as the rock wasn't a naturally musical item or interface to music. So in this model only Singing counts right? Well actually our vocal cords were not designed for singing, it is something humans invented by vibrating them in a pattern. So in the strictest sense, even Singing is no longer a NUI instrument.

See how this gets complicated, and why it isn't so great to point out where you think the line is for others?

thenetavenger said,

Ironically, you are also shoving the definition outside of conventional limits. Even 'talking' to a computer based on your definition is no longer a NUI, as you are telling an artificial device to perform an action, which is no longer 'natural'.

No, I'm just going by the standard definition for an NUI, which is defined as:

(1) effectively invisible, or becomes invisible with successive learned interactions, to its users, and (2) is based on nature or natural elements.

So no, the Metro UI is by very definition not a NUI. It's a touch-driven interface built with graphical elements, such as the aforementioned tiles.

MSFT's marketing department (Or maybe just the fanboy department) might try and claim it's a NUI or a transitional form to one, but it's not any more of a NUI than any other touch device.

Don't you guys get it? Stories like this and bad reviews drive traffic to website and earn money for the website. I have no problem with MUI at all its the broken apps that have me ****ed off. Maybe I'm on MS overload....I have a surface, win8 and Windows 8 phone. The music app is so crappy and hard to use. I don't know what MS was thinking but I have an idea....rebrand everything about Zune and submit as the Xbox music app. The Zune never worked as a iPod killer but the hardware was great and the software pwns iTunes. Unfortunately MS screwed it up with this failed abortion of a music app.

mrdeezus said,
Don't you guys get it? Stories like this and bad reviews drive traffic to website and earn money for the website. I have no problem with MUI at all its the broken apps that have me ****ed off. Maybe I'm on MS overload....I have a surface, win8 and Windows 8 phone. The music app is so crappy and hard to use. I don't know what MS was thinking but I have an idea....rebrand everything about Zune and submit as the Xbox music app. The Zune never worked as a iPod killer but the hardware was great and the software pwns iTunes. Unfortunately MS screwed it up with this failed abortion of a music app.

I have to agree with the current Music App, and these are some of the 'fill in the holes' things that Microsoft is correcting, that started with restructuring and getting rid of Sinofsky.

The single-window strategy works well on tablets and is required on a small phone screen. But with a big monitor and dozens of applications and websites running simultaneously, a high-end PC user definitely benefits from the ability to see multiple windows at the same time. Indeed, the most important web use cases involve collecting, comparing, and choosing among several web pages, and such tasks are much easier with several windows when you have the screen space to see many things at once.

Thank you! I've been saying the exact same thing starting day one.

I find his points valid. I find it uncomprehensible why Microsoft thought it was a good idea to put the Metro interface on by default on desktop systems.
It is never, ever, a good idea to have two radically different user interfaces on one system that the user needs to switch between - where some features have migrated to interface B and other are left in interface A. It violates the most basic interface design principles.
Some people claim you can just igonre the metro part of the interface, but that is just not true. Metro has taken over the start menu, the charms menu can appear i the desktop, and every time you start your computer you are greeted with it.

You are correct sir. That is why I stated above it is wrong from the desktop point o view. Tablets, phones and All-In-Ones is another story. I love Win 7 and will stick with that for the time being.

Fred77 said,
I find his points valid. I find it uncomprehensible why Microsoft thought it was a good idea to put the Metro interface on by default on desktop systems.
It is never, ever, a good idea to have two radically different user interfaces on one system that the user needs to switch between - where some features have migrated to interface B and other are left in interface A. It violates the most basic interface design principles.
Some people claim you can just igonre the metro part of the interface, but that is just not true. Metro has taken over the start menu, the charms menu can appear i the desktop, and every time you start your computer you are greeted with it.

Fred77 said,
I find his points valid. I find it uncomprehensible why Microsoft thought it was a good idea to put the Metro interface on by default on desktop systems.
It is never, ever, a good idea to have two radically different user interfaces on one system that the user needs to switch between - where some features have migrated to interface B and other are left in interface A. It violates the most basic interface design principles.
Some people claim you can just igonre the metro part of the interface, but that is just not true. Metro has taken over the start menu, the charms menu can appear i the desktop, and every time you start your computer you are greeted with it.

Or just install Start8 and you're OK again

vhaakmat said,

Or just install Start8 and you're OK again

Perhaps. But I think the better solution would be not to install Windows 8 at all, then there is no need to make Windows 8 behave as Windows 7.

In other news... Experts disagree on each other's findings... There you go. I wonder how good these 12 users are. My 11 year old didn't know I upgraded the OS the previous night. He just wanted to touch the screen, but realized he couldn't, so he used his mouse and continued like nothing happened. By the time I reached home from work, he was explaining me all the niceties of Win8 and how he liked it and when we could get a touch screen for it.. So there you go

Well that settles it then, because 2 people allegedly find w8 perfect, everyone who doesn't must be wrong. Jesus how pathetic.

Hahaiah said,
Well that settles it then, because 2 people allegedly find w8 perfect, everyone who doesn't must be wrong. Jesus how pathetic.

No, but 12 persons is not a good sample data either

I will stick with Windows 7. It just works for me. I tried Win8 on a surface at a Microsoft Store and it was not bad but it should stay in the tablet world (the MUI). Having a desktop and then having to switch between both UI is cumbersome and that should have never happened. Leave MUI for tablets and the desktop the desktop. I feel they made a mistake here. Hopefully Win9 will fix these mistakes. Flame me all you want but it does make sense especially if you have a desktop with no touch screen.

You do have the all in ones which is fine also for the MUI but again a true desktop should just boot into the desktop and that is all.

flynempire said,
I will stick with Windows 7. It just works for me. I tried Win8 on a surface at a Microsoft Store and it was not bad but it should stay in the tablet world (the MUI). Having a desktop and then having to switch between both UI is cumbersome and that should have never happened. Leave MUI for tablets and the desktop the desktop. I feel they made a mistake here. Hopefully Win9 will fix these mistakes. Flame me all you want but it does make sense especially if you have a desktop with no touch screen.

You do have the all in ones which is fine also for the MUI but again a true desktop should just boot into the desktop and that is all.

Well if you tried it in a store, you would have all the information you would ever need to plan out your computer usage for the next few years.

Really? Here is the trick, use it as your main OS for a couple of hours, and then if someone forced you back to Windows 7 you would find yourself missing the new navigation features that work really well with keyboard and mouse (better than touch at times) and also find yourself missing the 'live' Start Screen with your team's headlines, your personalized news, your mail your messaging, etc and missing the ability to even run a lot of really good Windows 8 Store Apps like Netflix and others that take advantage of the new UI and are handy for even keyboard and mouse users.

Marcus Bastian said,
THIS is his website: http://www.useit.com/jakob/

Don't know where he got his fame from ^^

Actually if you ignore the fact that the site is really plain and very 1990s in style, it is still easy to navigate and easy to read.

You can probably find some of his books in a library. They're good stuff and he is spot on about Windows 8 UI.

It boggles me that the people who came up with it seem to have difficulty grasping some basic usability concepts. In fact Win8 is probably designed by a committee and that never results in anything good.

LaXu said,

Actually if you ignore the fact that the site is really plain and very 1990s in style, it is still easy to navigate and easy to read.

You can probably find some of his books in a library. They're good stuff and he is spot on about Windows 8 UI.

It boggles me that the people who came up with it seem to have difficulty grasping some basic usability concepts. In fact Win8 is probably designed by a committee and that never results in anything good.

Whether he is spot on or not, is a matter of arguable opinion. However, I for one cannnot ignore that this usability "expert" seems stuck in his 1990s ways. I happen to think Win8 is exceedingly usable. In fact, if I want up to date information from Mail, or People, or News, a lot of the times I need do nothing other than look at the Start screen. No clicking. No navigating. I don't see how you get much more usable than that.

I do think anyone that expects everything to be presented in a generic list of links circa 1998 might find it unusable.

LaXu said,

Actually if you ignore the fact that the site is really plain and very 1990s in style, it is still easy to navigate and easy to read.

You can probably find some of his books in a library. They're good stuff and he is spot on about Windows 8 UI.

It boggles me that the people who came up with it seem to have difficulty grasping some basic usability concepts. In fact Win8 is probably designed by a committee and that never results in anything good.

And you can find a self appointed usability expert that would have told you Google was brilliant 10 years ago, and all the new features that they copied over from Bing were not needed and just clutter up the simple UI.

There are people that eat dirt and like mixing contrasting primary colors in their plaid outfits too. Doesn't make them an expert on dirt or a geologist, nor an expert on clothing design.

All valid points that anyone should be able to understand, though I don't give those in the bubble that much credit.

Here's a solution; don't use metro apps on a desktop/laptop, period.

If you're on a non-touch device, just stick to desktop, remove all metro apps from start screen, pin your desktop applications and frequent folders to start and be done with it.

Is it really that hard?!

eddman said,
Here's a solution; don't use metro apps, period.

If you're on a non-touch device, just stick to desktop, remove all metro apps from start screen, pin your desktop applications and frequent folders to start and be done with it.

Is it really that hard?!

or...just stick to w7.

eddman said,
Here's a solution; don't use metro apps on a desktop/laptop, period.

If you're on a non-touch device, just stick to desktop, remove all metro apps from start screen, pin your desktop applications and frequent folders to start and be done with it.

Is it really that hard?!

Yes, its entirely too hard (for the power users and experts, that is).

smooth3006 said,

or...just stick to w7.

... and give up the ability to run any of the new Apps
... and give up the performance increases
... and give up GP-GPU features
... and give up (This list is about 1000 items, should I continue?)

Honestly, I can see his points... I'm not completely against Windows 8, but I definitely feel that it needs some work. And I REALLY don't think that Modern Apps are going to get much use on desktops... Tablets, absolutely. But desktop users will be using the Desktop 99% of the time.

M_Lyons10 said,
Honestly, I can see his points... I'm not completely against Windows 8, but I definitely feel that it needs some work. And I REALLY don't think that Modern Apps are going to get much use on desktops... Tablets, absolutely. But desktop users will be using the Desktop 99% of the time.

While I agree the OS isn't perfect, I enjoy the Metro apps on my desktop and I've used computers/Windows for many years.

Sekyal said,

While I agree the OS isn't perfect, I enjoy the Metro apps on my desktop and I've used computers/Windows for many years.

As do I. I tend to use desktop IE more than Metro, but I have easily adapted to metro Mail, Music, etc. Use MetroTwit Metro for Twitter and the News and Bing apps regularly. I do spend a lot of time in desktop, but mostly because of non-Metro apps like Quicken, Visual Studio, iTunes and a few others. But I use the new Start screen as home base and quite like it.

Good grief.. Just buy Start 8 by Stardock ($5 usd) or something similar and get your start menu back.. Win 8 is far better than core Win 7 so get your start menu back and enjoy the benefits on Windows 8..

mrchas1 said,
Good grief.. Just buy Start 8 by Stardock ($5 usd) or something similar and get your start menu back.. Win 8 is far better than core Win 7 so get your start menu back and enjoy the benefits on Windows 8..

OR don't spend $5 and use the OS the way its meant to be and stop dwelling on archaic useless features like a start button.

mrchas1 said,
Good grief.. Just buy Start 8 by Stardock ($5 usd) or something similar and get your start menu back.. Win 8 is far better than core Win 7 so get your start menu back and enjoy the benefits on Windows 8..

Why, the start menu and button are still there. There is not need for an add-on to put something back that isn't gone.

Damn I gotta go tell my grandma shes not the noob she thinks she is. She's better at using Windows 8 then a supposed usability expert and 12 "experienced" pc owners.

Is there an option or a tweak to use Start Menu ou Metro App in a windowed mode ?

I have a 24" screen and some app are not really usable in full view. Same for the start menu where I have a lot of space in the up and down part.

Tamatea said,
Is there an option or a tweak to use Start Menu ou Metro App in a windowed mode ?

I have a 24" screen and some app are not really usable in full view. Same for the start menu where I have a lot of space in the up and down part.


There recently was an "Ad" for such a tool here on Neowin. I think it was called "RetroUI Pro".

if it weren't for start8 i would of never even purchased w8. still trying my best to like it and not go back to w7. just about everybody i know who bought it, dislikes it. but since neowin is pro anything microsoft, no matter how crappy the product is i guess were in the wrong for not accepting "change" even though it's a huge step backwards from w7.

smooth3006 said,
if it weren't for start8 i would of never even purchased w8. still trying my best to like it and not go back to w7. just about everybody i know who bought it, dislikes it. but since neowin is pro anything microsoft, no matter how crappy the product is i guess were in the wrong for not accepting "change" even though it's a huge step backwards from w7.

the past few years neowin has been more pro mac then pro win....

smooth3006 said,

the front page says different.

you missed the tons of iPhone, Mac book, IOS, Mac OSX topics huh? we use to have near zero!

"12 "experienced" PC owners "

There is the problem right there. After I told 12 morons to swipe in from left right or top with the Surface, they were able to get around pretty good.

jimmyfal said,
"12 "experienced" PC owners "

There is the problem right there. After I told 12 morons to swipe in from left right or top with the Surface, they were able to get around pretty good.

the problem is, you shouldn't have to tell them, there should be some visual indicator giving it away you can do this... its like the start button, its still there, but there is no visual indicator... people think its gone, well no its still there, just invisible now... the average user needs visual cues

jimmyfal said,
"12 "experienced" PC owners "

There is the problem right there. After I told 12 morons to swipe in from left right or top with the Surface, they were able to get around pretty good.

I'm sure your friends are going to love you... LOL

neufuse said,

the problem is, you shouldn't have to tell them, there should be some visual indicator giving it away you can do this... its like the start button, its still there, but there is no visual indicator... people think its gone, well no its still there, just invisible now... the average user needs visual cues


I suppose on Android it is obvious you swipe down to see notifications? Or Holding down the home button brings up running apps?
There are always new things to learn with a different OS like Windows. Now I do wish there was a better tutorial for Windows 8 when people first use it, but otherwise you discover things as you go.

Also if people would have just learned to hit the Windows Key on their keyboard and stop being overly dependant on their mouse would help.

neufuse said,

the problem is, you shouldn't have to tell them, there should be some visual indicator giving it away you can do this... its like the start button, its still there, but there is no visual indicator... people think its gone, well no its still there, just invisible now... the average user needs visual cues

You mean like the visual cues on the iPad.

neufuse said,

the problem is, you shouldn't have to tell them, there should be some visual indicator giving it away you can do this... its like the start button, its still there, but there is no visual indicator... people think its gone, well no its still there, just invisible now... the average user needs visual cues

That 4 finger swipe on the iPad is REALLY intuitive, isn't it?

rfirth said,

That 4 finger swipe on the iPad is REALLY intuitive, isn't it?


Is it mandatory to use the OS? I think not; hell I even know iPad owners that don't know these gestures...

Sekyal said,

I suppose on Android it is obvious you swipe down to see notifications? Or Holding down the home button brings up running apps?
There are always new things to learn with a different OS like Windows. Now I do wish there was a better tutorial for Windows 8 when people first use it, but otherwise you discover things as you go.

Also if people would have just learned to hit the Windows Key on their keyboard and stop being overly dependant on their mouse would help.


Exactly my thought. And better tutorial is much needed. An tutorial shorcut/app on start screen for example. So experienced users can skip them, but new users can discover windows 8 themselves.
Staples advertising free Windows 8 tutorial was showing that exact problem. Why did the dad with new Win8 PC need to ask his son (on Mac) for help or get free tutorial from Staples? Can't he just learn it with nice video/ interactive tutorial instead!

neufuse said,

the problem is, you shouldn't have to tell them, there should be some visual indicator giving it away you can do this... its like the start button, its still there, but there is no visual indicator... people think its gone, well no its still there, just invisible now... the average user needs visual cues

You are right, I agree. And I have seen SOME application take this into there own hands. Hulu puts an icon in the upper right corner of the screen that looks like a magnifying glass. When you click, it brings up the search charm.

I do agree also that Microsoft should have put a tutorial video FAQ, LIVE TILE front and center. This was somewhat in excusable. My real point I think is that on touch it's not so hard to figure out, if you at least have the swipe cues that the piece of paper in the box clues you in on.

Wow, what a troll this guy is. Does he not realize on the tablets you can snap windows to the side and have multiple windows open in desktop mode as well?

Why have ignorant people been getting so much attention lately. The world is doomed with all of the stupidity out there.

norseman said,
Wow, what a troll this guy is. Does he not realize on the tablets you can snap windows to the side and have multiple windows open in desktop mode as well?

Why have ignorant people been getting so much attention lately. The world is doomed with all of the stupidity out there.

He does address the snap feature.

(Not saying I agree or disagree with his conclusion. Only pointing out that he does realize what you mention, and he does speak about it.)

I'm a usability expert, too (heh, not professionally).

I did argue back when Windows Phone was first out that the Metro style cut down on information density compared to the iOS interface, but that was just a trade-off. A lot of people would say, just looking at WP alone, that the trade-off was worth it.

With all the usability nits he picks, I still think the Start Screen is more usable than the Start Menu for novice users. I have experience helping people who aren't computer savvy, and they still have problems with the Start Menu. So the guy, IMO, should first do a usability study of Windows 7, and then determine how the same users would respond to Windows 8.

Quotes from his site

One of the worst aspects of Windows 8 for power users is that the product's very name has become a misnomer. "Windows" no longer supports multiple windows on the screen.

Also, the main UI restricts users to a single window, so the product ought to be renamed "Microsoft Window."

Did Neowin just post a news story it thought was real, but is in fact a person 100% trolling?

xendrome said,
Quotes from his site
Did Neowin just post a news story it thought was real, but is in fact a person 100% trolling?

well, go ahead and argue it, because what he said is true, you cant deny it. The best option you have with windows 8 is that stupid split screen, that's it. Unless you go back to the windows 7 style desktop.

xendrome said,
Quotes from his site

Did Neowin just post a news story it thought was real, but is in fact a person 100% trolling?

Actually, there is more to it than that. First he calls himself a website design expert. I didn't know Windows 8 was a web site, I always thought it was an operating system. Then, he was a distinguished engineer at Sun, one of Microsoft's biggest competitors at the time he worked there, so we know he wouldn't have a conflict of interest. But he also claims to have designed Sun's website while he worked there. I used Sun computers during the time he worked there, and used their web site often - I remember it being anything but usable and pretty.

I am Reid said,

well, go ahead and argue it, because what he said is true, you cant deny it. The best option you have with windows 8 is that stupid split screen, that's it. Unless you go back to the windows 7 style desktop.

Um... that "windows 7 style desktop" thingy to which you refer has, um... like, been a part of, you know, um... Windows since, like, um ... 1995 man.

I would suggest, that to the more seasoned user, the "desktop" would be an even better choice than "that stupid split screen" feature to satisfy your multitasking needs. YMMV.

First he calls himself a website design expert. I didn't know Windows 8 was a web site.

This reply smacks of unqualified desperation to defend Windows 8 despite its obvious failings. Jakob Nielsen is, and has been for as far back as I can recall, a usability consultant, not a web design expert. Sure, he often writes about web design but he has long since been employed to consult on usability of applications, etc.

He doesn't rely on favouritism or allegiance to any company to reach his conclusions. He uses eye-tracking software and much more to monitor how successfully an application is used. It is not enough to just say 'I like it so it is great' when it comes to selling it to the public. If you can't accept conclusions brought to the table by someone who has long since been respected in his field then you really need to stop reading finding on Windows 8 as I am sure this won't be the last one that picks faults in it.

oh please usability expert? obviously this is a made up title to bad mouth windows 8, nothing could possibly be wrong with windows 8's usability..... psssshhhhhh please metro (Modern, Modern design, MDL, what ever we want to call it this week) is the perfect UI that has zero flaws!

neufuse said,
oh please usability expert? obviously this is a made up title to bad mouth windows 8, nothing could possibly be wrong with windows 8's usability..... psssshhhhhh please metro (Modern, Modern design, MDL, what ever we want to call it this week) is the perfect UI that has zero flaws!

A bold claim to say zero flaws, the search defo needs work, I don't want to have to click files because its only showing me apps by default, we need a universal results page.

thealexweb said,

A bold claim to say zero flaws, the search defo needs work, I don't want to have to click files because its only showing me apps by default, we need a universal results page.


I think he forgot the /s tag

neufuse said,
oh please usability expert? obviously this is a made up title to bad mouth windows 8, nothing could possibly be wrong with windows 8's usability..... psssshhhhhh please metro (Modern, Modern design, MDL, what ever we want to call it this week) is the perfect UI that has zero flaws!

You are in denial. Read the study once again. Windows MUI does not belong on desktop.

neufuse said,
is it seriously that hard to detect sarcasm in a highly sarcastic post without a /s anymore? common people

Sarcasm on the internet without sarcasm tags is like a fly trap...

GS:mac

neufuse said,
oh please usability expert? obviously this is a made up title to bad mouth windows 8, nothing could possibly be wrong with windows 8's usability..... psssshhhhhh please metro (Modern, Modern design, MDL, what ever we want to call it this week) is the perfect UI that has zero flaws!

Neowin is full of screaming failed boys... Whatever if you're being sarcastic or not, there's so much BS everywhere, so many 'specialists' everywhere, that reason is fast becoming a shame.
The guy is being reasonable, and that is a shame around here these days.

neufuse said,
oh please usability expert? obviously this is a made up title to bad mouth windows 8, nothing could possibly be wrong with windows 8's usability..... psssshhhhhh please metro (Modern, Modern design, MDL, what ever we want to call it this week) is the perfect UI that has zero flaws!

Glassed Silver said,

Sarcasm on the internet without sarcasm tags is like a fly trap...

GS:mac


How's that? they both hurt when you get your **** trapped in them?

thealexweb said,

A bold claim to say zero flaws, the search defo needs work, I don't want to have to click files because its only showing me apps by default, we need a universal results page.


It is not that much less usable. You can
Win+Q : App search
Win+W : Settings search
Win+F : File search
Reason for my suggestion: You search something meaning your hands already on keyboard. Universal search might give you top result from a different category than the one that you specifically looking, then you have to use your arrow key, not much faster than dedicate search.

nguyen2011 said,

It is not that much less usable. You can
Win+Q : App search
Win+W : Settings search
Win+F : File search
Reason for my suggestion: You search something meaning your hands already on keyboard. Universal search might give you top result from a different category than the one that you specifically looking, then you have to use your arrow key, not much faster than dedicate search.

Keyboard shortcuts are the bane of my existence XD

thealexweb said,

A bold claim to say zero flaws, the search defo needs work, I don't want to have to click files because its only showing me apps by default, we need a universal results page.

Ya you need to find a 10 year old to explain the new contextual search concept Windows 8 uses.

The Files and Apps are separated, but Windows 8 adds the ability to use the 'search charms' to flip between searches inside Apps. (Think federated search on Windows 7, but 100 times the features.)

So you can type a term in, like "Justin Timberlake" and click "Internet Explorer" and get a general search or click on "Music" and get all his albums and songs and then click on "Videos or Netflix or Hulu" and get a list of the Movies and what is available, and Wikipedia to see information on him, and "News" to see any recent headlines on him, etc etc. (Assuming you are a Justin Timberlake fan.)

And this all happens faster than you could open the web pages on Windows 7 and dig through the internet and Netflix and hulu and Wikipedia and news.

nguyen2011 said,

It is not that much less usable. You can
Win+Q : App search
Win+W : Settings search
Win+F : File search
Reason for my suggestion: You search something meaning your hands already on keyboard. Universal search might give you top result from a different category than the one that you specifically looking, then you have to use your arrow key, not much faster than dedicate search.

yay! more keyboard shortcuts! just let me type that on my tabl.... wait.. how grr.. darn touch screen typing... thought touchscreens where suppose to reduce this typing stuff... growl!

neufuse said,
oh please usability expert? obviously this is a made up title to bad mouth windows 8, nothing could possibly be wrong with windows 8's usability..... psssshhhhhh please metro (Modern, Modern design, MDL, what ever we want to call it this week) is the perfect UI that has zero flaws!

Oh please!! MDL is mydigitallife. Period!