VeraCrypt 1.0d

veracrypt

VeraCrypt is a free disk encryption software based on TrueCrypt. It adds enhanced security to the algorithms used for system and partitions encryption making it immune to new developments in brute-force attacks.

For example, when the system partition is encrypted, TrueCrypt uses PBKDF2-RIPEMD160 with 1000 iterations whereas in VeraCrypt we use 327661. And for standard containers and other partitions, TrueCrypt uses at most 2000 iterations but VeraCrypt uses 655331 for RIPEMD160 and 500000 iterations for SHA-2 and Whirlpool.

This enhanced security adds some delay only to the opening of encrypted partitions without any performance impact to the application use phase. This is acceptable to the legitimate owner but it makes it much more harder for an attacker to gain access to the encrypted data.

VeraCrypt storage format is INCOMPATIBLE with TrueCrypt storage format.

Changes between 1.0c and 1.0d:

  • Correct issue while creating hidden operating system.
  • Minor fixes (look at git history for more details).

Download: VeraCrypt 1.0d | 3.3 MB (Open Source)
View: VeraCrypt Home page

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7 Comments

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The development of TrueCrypt was ended in 5/2014 after Microsoft terminated support of Windows XP. Windows 8/7/Vista and later offer integrated support for encrypted disks and virtual disk images.

Please keep in mind that people didn't just use this program on Windows. There are Mac OS and Linux ports as well which have their own solutions but people may not be aware of. Encrypted disk support is only available on higher editions of Windows and by default require a TPM chip but can be modified via group policy (which the editor is once again only available on higher editions) to work without a TPM chip.

Any Truecrypt replacement will require heavy scrutiny for both code and developers. Governments have already proven their willing to go to any lengths to spy on user's data with or without our knowledge and infiltrating or even creating projects like this I would consider probable. I'm not saying that's the case here, I'm just saying I wouldn't touch it with a ten foot pole until vetted. If it's not 100% open source, again, not touching it. The NSA has raised the level of scrutiny to maximum for security related software and rightly so.

This seems like it could be good but considering the actual TrueCrypt is being audited and assuming it passes wouldn't that actually be the safer choice than using some more unknown program like this?

like use TrueCrypt as long as possible until you are forced to use other software.

ThaCrip said,
This seems like it could be good but considering the actual TrueCrypt is being audited and assuming it passes wouldn't that actually be the safer choice than using some more unknown program like this?

like use TrueCrypt as long as possible until you are forced to use other software.

I agree, TC has done well so far and it's not like we have anything major to hide - TC is stable and works well - the audit on the first few pieces of code went well and I'm sure the next stage will too.