Vista Aims to Stop Hackers' Social Engineering Ploys

Microsoft maintains that by addressing the social aspect of IT attacks, the portion that can dupe even the smartest users into launching malware-laden attachments or clicking unknown URLs, Vista will improve PC security significantly. Microsoft says the Windows operating system software is not the weakest link in desktop security, and contends that Windows Vista will help limit the greatest vulnerability of all—users' bad decision-making.

While previous iterations of Microsoft's dominant operating system hit the market with an abundance of security loopholes that left users open to many different forms of attack, Microsoft officials said new features offered in Vista will not only make it harder for malware writers attack the OS, but will also make it more difficult for users to hang themselves out to dry. Executives pointed to Microsoft's SDL (Security Development Lifecycle) program as an attempt to root out many of the coding flaws that have left gaping security holes in previous versions of Windows during development, and said the primary thrust of the security tools added in Vista has been to help customers help themselves.

From its UAC (User Account Control) feature, which is meant to limit the ability of viruses to gain access to administrator status on desktops, to the anti-phishing filters built into the newly released Internet Explorer 7 browser, Microsoft has attempted to give users the mechanisms they need to do a better job of watching their own backs, said Ben Fathi, the Redmond, Wash., company's vice president for the Windows core operating system.

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News source: eWeek

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We had the same discussion in Lithuanian forums and I could say 95% of all people said that they have turned it off. It made a lot of problems for them.

There was one nice article in Russian that, after Microsoft finishes it's work on Windows Vista security, even you won't be able to work with the data you are protecting.

The OS looks more simple now, but still it went to wrong direction, now even more popups and etc.

New games (like the Games For Windows titles) and new software won't ever need you to press any UAC buttons.

Maybe , maybe not, thats yet to be seen. Presently its a pain and will be turned off and most
users won't bother turning it back on.

tmf2 said,

Maybe , maybe not, thats yet to be seen. Presently its a pain and will be turned off and most
users won't bother turning it back on.

Oh really? Well i dont seem to have any problem with it. All my applications and games run without any UAC [or maybe 1 or 2 for MS office]. The only exception is Winrar which requires a uac prompt to do anything...

So please cut the crap about UAC being a pain. So much trouble to make 1 or 2 extra mouse clicks in a day yeh...

Shadowdruid said,
The only exception is Winrar which requires a uac prompt to do anything...
So please cut the crap about UAC being a pain. So much trouble to make 1 or 2 extra mouse clicks in a day yeh...

Thats odd, I use winrar without any UAC prompts at all, my guess is you're extracting to a partition/folder where you don't have full NTFS permissions, but I totally agree that UAC is non-issue once you get used to it.

JaredFrost said,

Thats odd, I use winrar without any UAC prompts at all, my guess is you're extracting to a partition/folder where you don't have full NTFS permissions, but I totally agree that UAC is non-issue once you get used to it.

Never mind :S Updating it fixed it!! I guess i was using a version from the dark ages.

UAC is a total pain in the rear and will be one of the first "security" features turned off by most users. In fact the majority of the so-called "security" features are far more of an annoyance than any real protection. Its like wearing a straitjacket most of the time.

UAC won't be an issue in a year from now. It's just that currently, applications aren't written to work with it.

New games (like the Games For Windows titles) and new software won't ever need you to press any UAC buttons. The exception will be when you change settings in anti-virus software and things like that.

UAC is the first thing I turn off followed by defender and the firewall and hell the security center service even. All of that is overhead BS which is munching resources and all of them are things which serious gamers and power-users simply kill to reclaim their ram and cpu.

Aahz said,
UAC is the first thing I turn off followed by defender and the firewall and hell the security center service even. All of that is overhead BS which is munching resources and all of them are things which serious gamers and power-users simply kill to reclaim their ram and cpu.

You way is wrong. If really want to do it, you should first do 2 additional steps:
1) Disconnect any internet cables
2) Trn Off PC.
3) Proceed with other steps