Websites sell secret bank data and PINs

Security breaches that are allowing the financial details of tens of thousands of Britons to be sold on the internet are to be investigated by the country's information watchdog.

Without paying a single penny, The Times downloaded banking information belonging to 32 people, including a High Court deputy judge and a managing director. The private account numbers, PINs and security codes were offered as tasters by illegal hacking sites in the hope that purchases would follow.

Richard Thomas, the Information Commissioner, will begin an investigation into the security breach today and Scotland Yard is also investigating. Experts said that the findings suggested that more personal data than ever before was going astray. The Times found: More than 100 websites trafficking British bank details A fraudster offering to sell 30,000 British credit card numbers for less than £1 each A British "e-passport" for sale, although the Government insists that they are unhackable.

View: Full Article @ The Times Online

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7 Comments

hmm -this is indeed worrying...it goes to show that our increasing dependance on technology to solve the world's security ill's is not only naive, but also incredibly dangerous now.

If people use dodgy sites ran by dodgy companies, then all this data is probably just stolen when someone makes an online purchase. There might not even be any "hacking" here.

If I stand at a cash machine and someone sees my pin when I enter if then steal my bank card numbers... this inst hacking into my account.

plastikaa said,
If people use dodgy sites ran by dodgy companies, then all this data is probably just stolen when someone makes an online purchase.

Right. This begs the question as to just how big a moron you have to be to use your credit card to buy (for example) porno in Russia or China (or anywhere else, actually).

If porno is the multi-billion dollar (pound, franc, mark, euro) business that everyone says it is, it's no wonder that millions of people's financial information is floating around the 'Net.

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