Windows 8 ARM version could ship late, says ARM head

Windows 8 will have a version that runs on x86 processors such as those made by Intel and AMD. Microsoft's next PC operating system will also have a version that will run on processors based on designs created by UK-based ARM. Companies like Qualcomm, Texas Instruments and NVIDIA have all pledged to make ARM-based chips that will run Windows 8.

There have been some questions about how well Windows 8 will run on ARM-based processors. However, the head of ARM, CEO Warren East, seemed to say in a new interview that he would rather Windows 8 for ARM be released late so Microsoft can make sure it works well.

The interview for Reuters, conducted during the CES 2012 show this week, has East saying, "We've waited a long time for this to happen. Another six months, another 12 months doesn't matter. I'd much rather wait however long it takes to get a quality experience than compromise."

East also sees Windows 8 competing with Google's Android in the tablet space, saying, "Google's Android is flavor of the month, flavor of the year, and we certainly want to be part of the Google success. But there is a space for Microsoft, and we very much want to be a part of that success too."

This week at CES, Intel announced that its Atom processor would be used in upcoming smartphones from Lenovo and Motorola. East, however, is unimpressed with Intel's move into ARM's territory, saying, "They (Intel) have taken some designs that were never meant for mobile phones and they've literally wrenched those designs and put them into a power-performance space which is roughly good enough for mobile phones."

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ARM is not Intel and Intel is not ARM. The two companies have completely different business models and the above statement by the CEO of ARM forget another point - Apple also uses the ARM Core in it's iOS devices.
There are so many flavors of "ARM chips" it makes the x86 market look generic.
Each of the licensees had modified the cores, combined multiple versions of cores, changed the way they access memory, threaded paths and use several GPUs in their designs.
When ARM starts actually starts selling a CPU (not just the schematics) then we will be able to say that ARM is the new Intel.
What we have here is something new for the Consumer Electronics industry.

I'd rather, that they both come together, and make a big bang!

(And this delay may actually benefit Intel for a short period.)

So, the first generation of Win8 Tablet will be using x86, so I guess we can forget about anything affordable.

The longer it takes for Win8 to be available (cheap) on a Tablet, the more chance Android/iOS will have to stick around even longer.

TruckWEB said,
So, the first generation of Win8 Tablet will be using x86, so I guess we can forget about anything affordable.

The longer it takes for Win8 to be available (cheap) on a Tablet, the more chance Android/iOS will have to stick around even longer.


x86 tablets will be able to compete with iPads etc on price imo, take a £400 laptop (spec wise), remove keyboard and swap screen for touch and slap it on one 'slab' - easy

All this means that in Warrens opinion (which I share) it would be best, that if windows 8 for arm was being hurried to meet the same release date as the std x86 version - then its best to delay it. We've waited long enough and a little more wont harm.

This is not an indication that it will be delayed, I'm not saying it wont, just that this is no indication it will.

duddit2 said,
All this means that in Warrens opinion (which I share) it would be best, that if windows 8 for arm was being hurried to meet the same release date as the std x86 version - then its best to delay it. We've waited long enough and a little more wont harm.

This is not an indication that it will be delayed, I'm not saying it wont, just that this is no indication it will.


Well said.

I'm going to stick for x86 for quite a long time, who knows how long. I like legacy support
Then again, I'm on a Mac, so I'll take what I get there, can't imagine Apple going ARM anytime soon.

GS:mac

duddit2 said,
All this means that in Warrens opinion (which I share) it would be best, that if windows 8 for arm was being hurried to meet the same release date as the std x86 version - then its best to delay it. We've waited long enough and a little more wont harm.

This is not an indication that it will be delayed, I'm not saying it wont, just that this is no indication it will.


Well said.

I'm going to stick for x86 for quite a long time, who knows how long. I like legacy support
Then again, I'm on a Mac, so I'll take what I get there, can't imagine Apple going ARM anytime soon.

GS:mac

duddit2 said,
All this means that in Warrens opinion (which I share) it would be best, that if windows 8 for arm was being hurried to meet the same release date as the std x86 version - then its best to delay it. We've waited long enough and a little more wont harm.

This is not an indication that it will be delayed, I'm not saying it wont, just that this is no indication it will.

One only needs to look at the tablets from RIM and HP/BlackBerry to know that waiting for a good product is better than shipping an unfinished product.

Kushan said,
ARM really are the new Intel.

Yeah, they have become really influential because of the boom in mobile devices.

Glassed Silver said,

Not really, no.

GS:mac

They've achieved monopolies in phones and other mobile devices, they've forced Intel to withdraw from the smartTV market so will achieve a monopoly there, basically ARM controls the high-growth areas while Intel holds the flatlining ones.

thealexweb said,

They've achieved monopolies in phones and other mobile devices, they've forced Intel to withdraw from the smartTV market so will achieve a monopoly there, basically ARM controls the high-growth areas while Intel holds the flatlining ones.

Ugh, this doesn't mean anything. For once, I don't really care about the market and who is in control of it. ARM doesn't have to deal with the bottleneck that is x86, they have it easy compared to Intel.

Intel owns practically the entire PC industry with their CPUs and chipsets. If you're out for a new PC, you want a Sandybridge system, not AMD. Intel is to IBM, as ARM is to Apple. What Intel does is make break-throughs happen everyday, ARM on the other hand...just does simple things that make their chips more energy efficent.

What CPUs are in servers that power the cloud and services like Facebook and Google? Intel. Not ARM. Intel has plans for several years later into the future, all their chipsets and CPUs, they have plans and concepts that go together. Not ARM. ARM functions a lot like Apple and a lot like Google with the constant Google Chrome updates...

Who came up with the Z68 chipset or the 2011 CPU socket? Who will be coming out with the HD Graphics 4000? What about Intel Smart Response? Ivy Bridge? Light Peak?

Intel has invented technology and will invent technology that will help change the world. ARM on the other hand has chips in practically every smartphone... But just because they own several markets does not mean it's time to knock Intel out of the equation like Intel means nothing to anybody anymore. They are VERY RELEVANT just like IBM is.

thealexweb said,

They've achieved monopolies in phones and other mobile devices, they've forced Intel to withdraw from the smartTV market so will achieve a monopoly there, basically ARM controls the high-growth areas while Intel holds the flatlining ones.


I see where you're coming from, but I stand by what I say.
Intel means more than "BIGGIE PLAYER", which Intel themselves will remain to be for at least quite some time, so it's not easy to just say they were the new Intel, however, they are the new Intel of non-PC/Mac/Server hardware.

GS:mac

Glassed Silver said,
I see where you're coming from, but I stand by what I say. Intel means more than "BIGGIE PLAYER", which Intel themselves will remain to be for at least quite some time, so it's not easy to just say they were the new Intel, however, they are the new Intel of non-PC/Mac/Server hardware.

Then I think you need to inform yourself about 'Project Denver' which is a joint partnership between nVidia and ARM that has resulted in ARMv8 - the first 64bit ARM ISA that, IMHO, will provide a competitive advantage over Intel. When it comes to price/performance/power ARM has it all but the problem has been the lack of a visible big name supporting it outside its traditional markets. I'll bet my bottom dollar that if there is enough traction you'll see ARMv8 servers and desktops being supported by Microsoft.

Mr Nom Nom's said,

Then I think you need to inform yourself about 'Project Denver' which is a joint partnership between nVidia and ARM that has resulted in ARMv8 - the first 64bit ARM ISA that, IMHO, will provide a competitive advantage over Intel. When it comes to price/performance/power ARM has it all but the problem has been the lack of a visible big name supporting it outside its traditional markets. I'll bet my bottom dollar that if there is enough traction you'll see ARMv8 servers and desktops being supported by Microsoft.


Yea, but sometimes servers are quite architecture dependent.

GS:mac

"There have been some questions about how well Windows 8 will run on ARM-based processors. However, the head of ARM, CEO Warren East, seemed to say in a new interview that he would rather Windows 8 for ARM be released late so Microsoft can make sure it works well.

The interview for Reuters, conducted during the CES 2012 show this week, has East saying, "We've waited a long time for this to happen. Another six months, another 12 months doesn't matter. I'd much rather wait however long it takes to get a quality experience than compromise."

+1 to that!