Windows 8 could get more programming language support

Windows 8 already supports a number of programming languages, including many familiar ones such as C++, JavaScript/HTML5, Visual Basic, Visual C# and XAML. However, Microsoft is actively seeking to support even more programming languages for its next PC operating system.

ZDNet reports that during a session of Microsoft's Lang.Next conference this week, the company made its pitch to developers for more programming language support in Windows 8. Martyn Lovell, Microsoft's Development Manager for Windows Runtime, stated that Microsoft "...wants developers to create languages for the new (WinRT) developer platform.”

Microsoft has been posting articles on the Windows 8 app developer blog in recent weeks on how app creators can use the already supported programming languages to make "fast and fluid" Metro style apps for the OS. However, adding more programming options would almost certainly give developers new ways to create apps for Windows 8 that perhaps would work better for them than the currently available language choices.

During his conference session this week, Lovell admitted that while WinRT would "be at home" in any language, not all of them would be able to run "perfectly" under WinRT. Nevertheless, the fact that Microsoft is actively trying to support as many programming languages as they can will hopefully lead to a greater variety of features in Windows 8 apps in the future.

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If you consider that .NET Framework and the Common Language Runtime (CLR) is integrated into the WinRT as a subplatform, wouldn't it include even more languages such as IronRuby, IronPython, F#, etc?

Salutary7 said,
I would say Java, but look how J# turned out...

J# was a transitional language. Microsoft target Java developers with C#

Salutary7 said,
I would say Java, but look how J# turned out...

I think they should incorporate Java using the code available under GPL into a new version of J#. It might work instead of making it propriety.

The only other programming language really not on that list that can be considered is that piece of **** called Java.

htcz said,
The only other programming language really not on that list that can be considered is that piece of **** called Java.

Is Python not awesome enough for you?

htcz said,
The only other programming language really not on that list that can be considered is that piece of **** called Java.

Works fine on desktop and Android devices.

htcz said,
The only other programming language really not on that list that can be considered is that piece of **** called Java.

Even though I'm a big .NET fan and I'm dying to improve my skills in C# development, I could never say that Java is ****. It is a great language and it is great for developing on other devices that aren't Windows-based.

MS Lose32 said,

Is Python not awesome enough for you?

I have no experience about Python at all and always considered it a "scripting language" (which it is not)

http://www.tiobe.com/index.php...t/paperinfo/tpci/index.html

I dont know.......Python has been here since 1991: Last year it was at 6 and now it is at 9. C# (2001) is at 3, beating one of the most powerful (but error prone) and most used languages: C++

Never really convinced me WHY I should learn Python instead of any other language


Works fine on desktop and Android devices.

Fine? Android devices are IMO the best because of how open source they are BUT you hear people complaining how slow it is all the time. You know why that it? Java. So it doesnt work fine. It is (quoting Ballmer) like a cancer and slows everything down.


Even though I'm a big .NET fan and I'm dying to improve my skills in C# development, I could never say that Java is ****. It is a great language and it is great for developing on other devices that aren't Windows-based.

Mono is a great implementation for other non Windows based devices. I would use that (with C#) over Java anyday.

What the heck are they wanting to support? C++, C#, and VB should cover pretty much the production languages people actually use (save Java). Is there really a need for more esoteric language support? Are there a lot of Haskell coders clamouring for WinRT?

Skwerl said,
What the heck are they wanting to support? C++, C#, and VB should cover pretty much the production languages people actually use (save Java). Is there really a need for more esoteric language support? Are there a lot of Haskell coders clamouring for WinRT?

When .NET 1.0 came out, it was touted to be the one runtime for all languages on Windows. I believe they touted support for over a dozen languages on CLR 1.0.
SInce then, the other language people seem to have abandoned .NET.

This seems like a call to arms to get those folk back into the Windows fold, specifically targeting WinRT.

Skwerl said,
What the heck are they wanting to support? C++, C#, and VB should cover pretty much the production languages people actually use (save Java). Is there really a need for more esoteric language support? Are there a lot of Haskell coders clamouring for WinRT?
Um there's lots of badass programming languages that Windows doesn't support. Ever heard of Python? Ruby? Perl?

MS Lose32 said,
Um there's lots of badass programming languages that Windows doesn't support. Ever heard of Python? Ruby? Perl?

Anaconda is better.

Skwerl said,
What the heck are they wanting to support? C++, C#, and VB should cover pretty much the production languages people actually use (save Java).

Err.. No. That's C++ with proprietary Microsoft extensions, and DotNet. Not much choice at all really. Even Javascript is a better option than those two.

In the end though it comes down to portability. Writing something that's only going to run on a small proportion of Windows machines might not be worth it for many developers.

The trend these days seems to be portability. In games, and regular applications. That's why it's so hard to justify WInRT.

simplezz said,

Err.. No. That's C++ with proprietary Microsoft extensions, and DotNet. Not much choice at all really. Even Javascript is a better option than those two.

In the end though it comes down to portability. Writing something that's only going to run on a small proportion of Windows machines might not be worth it for many developers.

The trend these days seems to be portability. In games, and regular applications. That's why it's so hard to justify WInRT.

Cross platform portability is done on the code behind side, there is no cross platform portability in UI except for HTML or Java (and Java is no longer really does client side UI development). You write your logic in a language that is portable across platforms such as C/C++, then you write your UI in a language that is appropriate for the platform you are porting to.

Want to run on OSX/iOS, write your code in C/C++, call to it from Obj-C. Want to run on Windows, write your code in C/C++, call from C/C++ or .NET. Want to run on Win8 Metro, write your code in C/C++ and call it from VB/C#/C++ CLR/JavaScript. Want to run in Java, write your code in C/C++ and call through JNI (or whatever it is called now).

Every platform has their own language of choice. To make it sound like WinRT is at a disadvantage vs. the other platforms is just disingenuous. The only way to do real cross platform development is plain C/C++ in a console window, if you want to take users back 20 years.

simplezz said,

Err.. No. That's C++ with proprietary Microsoft extensions, and DotNet. Not much choice at all really. Even Javascript is a better option than those two.

Windows 8 / WinRT use completely native, standard C++. There are optional (ECMA standard) extensions called the Component Extensions which just make development easier (primarily covering things like ref-counting and smart pointers, and making them first-class language constructs).

You do not have to use those extensions if you don't want to. Your code will just be more verbose.

simplezz said,

Err.. No. That's C++ with proprietary Microsoft extensions, and DotNet. Not much choice at all really. Even Javascript is a better option than those two.

Javascript over C++ or C#/VB? Have you lost your fscking mind?!

MS Lose32 said,
Um there's lots of badass programming languages that Windows doesn't support. Ever heard of Python? Ruby? Perl?

*cough*

You need to rephrase that quite a bit. Windows Metro doesn't support for WinRT development.

These are effective and supported languages for native code with some also using .NET for managed .NET development.

Windows supports more languages than any other OS in history, so be clear that this is just about WinRT.

dotf said,

When .NET 1.0 came out, it was touted to be the one runtime for all languages on Windows. I believe they touted support for over a dozen languages on CLR 1.0.
SInce then, the other language people seem to have abandoned .NET.

Well, there's all sorts of esoteric stuff that's not going away. For example, there's a cruise line that runs COBOL.NET on all its cruise ships.

jakem1 said,
HTML and XAML aren't programming languages

yeah, a markup language vs a programming language... *scratches head*