Windows 8 desktop comes back with RetroUI from Thinix

We have already seen attempts to add the Start menu back into Windows 8 via the Start8 program. Now a company called Thinix is launching a product that will allow Windows 8 PC owners a way to boot straight to the desktop without first having to go through the "Modern" user interface.

Thinix's press release (via Marketwatch) reveals their Windows 8 "workaround", called RetroUI. The press release states:

Once logged in, users see the classic Windows desktop and can use the PC much like they did in Windows XP or Windows 7. Users can return to the Metro desktop and use Metro features as needed.

The program can also be configured to completely shut down the "Modern" (formerly Metro) UI in Windows 8. Thinix makes the claim that this will be helpful for larger business users who want to upgrade to Windows 8 but don't want to make the effort to learn the new UI.

RetroUI can also be used for remote desktop applications as well as multi-monitor support. It will also support a number of different languages.

The program is available for download now for $4.95 (along with a 14 day free trial version), which can be used by up to three personal PCs. RetroUI Pro for business owners is also available for $4.95. There is also a 50 percent price cut for educational and non-profit customers.

Source: Thinix press release | Image via Thinix

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Hey remember when everyone hated windows vista and it's start menu/ Superbar combo. That was fun.

Hey remember when everyone hated windows vista and it's start menu/ Superbar combo. That was fun.

Glad to see that third-party software companies are quickly providing to users the features and functionality that Microsoft consciously decided to eliminate. Such a pity, as giving users the choice of how to boot up and the appearance of their desktop would have been the correct thing to do. But...arrogance often blinds corporations.

People have to pay for this? LMFAO. I seen plenty of programs made by devs that do this for free and not just including Start8 which is worth paying for even in beta mode.

Ahhhh ...NO!
I can switch applications and multitask between Metro and Desktop Apps just fine - Thank you very much.

Developers who are trying to prevent people from using the Star Screen by creating tools such as these are holding back the consumers from learning new features, and from discovering the potential of the Windows 8 ...let alone make money from them.

RommelS said,
Ahhhh ...NO!
I can switch applications and multitask between Metro and Desktop Apps just fine - Thank you very much.

+1 I know some folks say they don't like it, fair enough as a personal choice... but I STILL don't get what's hard about it. In fact, it's a lot cleaner and easier than the old start. I'm tempted to upload a screenshot of my start screen to show folks easy to see tiles vs clicking the programs tab and trying to go through each folder (tiny icons sometimes not alphabetized). Just for show.

This doesn't look nearly as functional or useful as Start8. I've been running the beta and it's really nice. Still needs some polishing, but they've got time to get it done before the official launch of Windows 8.

Also, why was there no links, both in this article and in the source, to the Thinix website? You'd think someone would have thrown one in there somewhere.

Edited by Dean Wagner, Sep 5 2012, 2:13pm :

As a software developer, if I do a GoToMeeting with a user having an issue, and see they're using one of these things on Windows 8 I will refuse support until they revert it. Just saying.

You know I have no problem with people making tools to modify Windows 8 to make them more comfortable, but I fear that when the first Service Pack comes out, some people will suffer BSODS and then want to blame Microsoft.

Using third party hacks like this for some half-baked solution is a bit like those trying to get Windows Server to run like a desktop computer. "Convert your Windows Server 2008 to Windows 7 in four easy steps!"

I'd simply recommend not "upgrading". Why use an OS that you have to work around to get back to where you were? The Windows 8 improvements to the Desktop Interface is absolutely not major. The most visible ones being Ribbon in Explorer and a faux-Metro theme. There's only ONE change I like there, and that's the new Process Manager. But this is still inferior to Microsoft's (formerly Sysinternal's) Process Explorer tool, and most of Microsoft's efforts and attention have been dedicated to that-UI-that-you-dislike-and-try-to-disable.

In an engineering firm (that use CAD and email all day), what advantage is the Metro interface? It is just an annoyance. I am glad that it will be possible to boot straight to the desktop. But one should not have to pay for this. It should be an option in the OS.

Unfortunately, we look at Windows 8 being another "Vista". Therefore, we won't be upgrading from Windows 7 anytime soon. In actual fact, we will supporting employees with downgrading to Windows 7.

68k said,
In an engineering firm (that use CAD and email all day), what advantage is the Metro interface? It is just an annoyance. I am glad that it will be possible to boot straight to the desktop. But one should not have to pay for this. It should be an option in the OS.

Unfortunately, we look at Windows 8 being another "Vista". Therefore, we won't be upgrading from Windows 7 anytime soon. In actual fact, we will supporting employees with downgrading to Windows 7.

What do the engineers do when they first boot up their computer? They launch a program. Put the email and CAD programs on the start screen. When their computer boots, they click on the program they want to launch and they're back in the desktop with the program launching. Ta-Da. Takes the same amount of clicks as if the program was pinned to the taskbar on the desktop, which is 1 click.

I truly don't understand why someone would like to be in Desktop first.
As far as I know, the next step after getting into the desktop is launching an APP (or Explorer).
And both are possible right from the start screen.
Just set your favorite desktop apps shortcut in the start screen, and press them as the computer starts.
It's even nicer then get into the desktop, since you can get a glance over your last mails, calendar and friends posts in the People app.

yossistarz said,
I truly don't understand why someone would like to be in Desktop first.
As far as I know, the next step after getting into the desktop is launching an APP (or Explorer).
And both are possible right from the start screen.
Just set your favorite desktop apps shortcut in the start screen, and press them as the computer starts.
It's even nicer then get into the desktop, since you can get a glance over your last mails, calendar and friends posts in the People app.

This.

yossistarz said,

How can "This" be a resone? you can choose to have only your shortcuts, it you realy hate the Live tiles.

He's agreeing with you.

so instead of hitting win, win+d or clicking on the desktop tile someone is so idiotic to install a 3rd party app? i mean really, that person shouldn't be allowed to use a computer

"make the effort to learn the new UI" - wow... i can understand if someone does not like the metro UI but if it took effort to learn it than the person in question is retarded, period

morden said,
so instead of hitting win, win+d or clicking on the desktop tile someone is so idiotic to install a 3rd party app? i mean really, that person shouldn't be allowed to use a computer

"make the effort to learn the new UI" - wow... i can understand if someone does not like the metro UI but if it took effort to learn it than the person in question is retarded, period


Get out of your bubble, dude. There's a whole big world out there, and guess what, there are a lot of people in it that don't give a sh.t about computers. I'm sure a lot of them would laugh and call you the retarded one, and they'd probably be right.

Ruben Gomez Radioboy said,
It comes with Windows 7 too, you know.

And its free because you already have it.

(I LOVE Windows 8)


Thanks for being the 100. person to ignore that under the hood Windows 8 offers improvements over Windows 7!

I'm not sure they have estimated their market correctly. Would any "large business" really roll out what is essentially a hack? I doubt it. The real market for this tool is individual power users who can't cope with change.

Timble said,
I'm not sure they have estimated their market correctly. Would any "large business" really roll out what is essentially a hack? I doubt it. The real market for this tool is individual power users who can't cope with change.

Business is never, ever going to roll out third party tools. Especially from a name no one has ever heard of before.

this is how btw


Right click on the start menu hot spot and select control panel.
Change into Large Icon view
Select "administrative tools"
double click "task scheduler"
On the right side, click "create basic task"
type a name (ex. Boot to Desktop) and click "Next"
select a trigger of "When I log On" and click "Next"
Select "Start a program" and click "Next"
In the program/script box, type in "explorer.exe" and click next.
Click "Finish"

Restart pc and enjoy.. Dont bother paying for this crap.

Here is another way and its free!
http://dm-moinmoin.deviantart....desktop-windows-8-307078343

MrAnalysis said,
this is how btw


Right click on the start menu hot spot and select control panel.
Change into Large Icon view
Select "administrative tools"
double click "task scheduler"
On the right side, click "create basic task"
type a name (ex. Boot to Desktop) and click "Next"
select a trigger of "When I log On" and click "Next"
Select "Start a program" and click "Next"
In the program/script box, type in "explorer.exe" and click next.
Click "Finish"

Restart pc and enjoy.. Dont bother paying for this crap.

Here is another way and its free!
http://dm-moinmoin.deviantart....desktop-windows-8-307078343

This program allegedly does more than your workaround in that it claims that it allows you to effectively disable Metro entirely. With your method, you can still end up back in Metro.

I think I may take one of our Win8 test laptops and give this a shot to see how well it does what it claims and what it breaks.

I'm not a fan of booting into start screen either, but seeing that desktop is only one click away, I don't get why it's such a big deal for some.

eddman said,
I'm not a fan of booting into start screen either, but seeing that desktop is only one click away, I don't get why it's such a big deal for some.

Agreed!

I use the keyboard mainly so I just Winkey+D to get to the desktop and just Winkey to show the start menu. These are not new hotkeys for Windows 8...

I have no clue why people have issues with modern ui...

eddman said,
I'm not a fan of booting into start screen either, but seeing that desktop is only one click away, I don't get why it's such a big deal for some.

Welcome to the internet. Changes? *aaaaaaargh*!!!! No changes? *aaaaaaargh*!!!!

Why would anyone in their right mind pay for something that can be had for free via Start8 and Classic Shell? Am I missing something with this product that the other 2 don't offer?

nytiger73 said,
Why would anyone in their right mind pay for something that can be had for free via Start8 and Classic Shell? Am I missing something with this product that the other 2 don't offer?

Nope. Why pay for this when Skip Metro Suite, Classic Shell and Start8 are all free solutions to go to desktop? Skip Metro Suite is even faster than Classic Shell or Start8 to show the desktop and FREE.

Completely shut down moderni ui.....Is that possible without causing problems??? I thought some programs are linked to it in some way or another, or would those programs not specifically be used in a business scenario?

I dont see the point in this, you can disable metro on boot via reg hack still i think. Not only that but Start8 does a grate job of bringing back the start menu.

If your really fussy then someone is working on a windows 7 explorer for windows 8. This will bring back start menu and no metro!

after you use it, the new UI isn't such a big of a deal. you never see it actually and the only real change is searching. instead of a ridiculously small panel you now get a full screen search results panel. that is all.

neonspark said,
after you use it, the new UI isn't such a big of a deal. you never see it actually and the only real change is searching. instead of a ridiculously small panel you now get a full screen search results panel. that is all.

I played around with it on my primary machine running the 90-day version, it's good, but didn't work out too well with my setup - dual monitors, where my second monitor is to the bottom left of the screen.
I had to be really careful to open the start menu (even with the great dualscreen improvements) not to move my mouse into the next window. I had to get a button down there, and Start8 did the job for me, and it then upgraded to the Win7 start menu and I haven't used the metro start windows in a long time.
If I was forced to use Win8 metro start, I would, without complaint.

"In Windows 8, Microsoft made the decision to require that all PCs load the Metro desktop after login. This decision has caused many organizations to delay or even cancel a migration to Windows 8 because they do not desire to train users to deal with the Metro User Interface."

Sounds like the usual complete nonsense to me. No business would have put Windows 8 on their migration plans and then cancelled purely because of the new interface, seeing as the Modern UI was a part of Windows 8 since the very beginning.

Another claim is that business can upgrade but not bother with Modern UI. Why would a business bother upgrading at all in that case?

If I was a business and I didn't like the new UI, I'd simply leave it, not purchase and install hacks to make it behave like a previous version of Windows. Why not just purchase the previous version of Windows?

No offense, but your comment sounds like the usual complete nonsense to me. I hear/read this same argument all the time and it is becoming tiresome. Windows 8 is not Windows 7 + Modern UI. There have been a lot of changes under the hood. Out of all the changes made to 8, ones involving or relating to the Modern UI make up about 30% of them--of course, I'm pulling that number out of thin air, but you get my point. With that in mind, why would a person/business not want to utilize the 70% of great improvements because of the 30% of unfavorable UI changes? Especially when there are tools out there that will allow you to take advantage of all the positive changes while ignoring the negative ones?

Furthermore, it is obvious you are not a business. A business isn't one single hive-minded entity. A business is made up by a large number of people from all walks of life and extremely varying degrees of computer experience. As shocking as this may come to someone who frequents technology news sites, there are people out there who hate computers. *gasp* They use them at work because they have to, but at home a lot of people don't even own them. They know enough to do their job, but they have no interest in learning any more than that. A lot of these same people are older and have been doing things a certain way for a long time and are resistant to change. Imagine these people coming into work and booting up their PCs to find a fresh Windows 8 install after they've been using XP for the past decade. Better yet, imagine being the guy responsible for Windows 8 being on their computer and for making sure they know how to use it.

I run the IT department for a company who manufactures aircraft parts, mostly for military contractors. The guys in the shop are damn good at working with metal. They use a lot of computer-ran equipment, but outside of configuring that equipment to accomplish a task, they couldn't care less about that computer or have less of a desire to spend any more time on it then they have to. There are receptionists, sales staff, shipping/receiving, inventory control, and executives that have all settled into a routine that they'd rather not have interrupted. None of these people are going to be bouncing in their chairs and clapping their hands in anticipation of getting a new OS.

On the other side of the coin, I'm dealing with tight budgets, decade-old equipment, increased security risks, constant repairs, and a plethora of other problems. The cost involved (as far as workstations go) in migrating over from Windows XP to Windows 8 is a fraction of what it would cost to move to Windows 7. Every proposal I've made to go from XP to 7 has been shot down due to the price involved in replacing so many workstations. So, for someone who feels much like The Little Dutch Boy, Windows 8 is a blessing and a curse at the same time.

The positive aspect is the fact that it is designed to run on 32-bit tablets with limited resources. That makes the ability to get it running on some of these older computers very enticing. Couple that with its extremely affordable upgrade cost at launch and it is hard to ignore. To go from XP to 8 it is just a matter of an upgrade license and some more RAM. All the workstations here are running 32-bit dual-core 2-3GHz processors. Max out the RAM to 4GB and they will be able to handle Windows 8 all day long. With all of these factors, making the move from XP to 8 is almost unavoidable. That's not an accident, either, that's by design.

The negative aspect is simply that it is designed to run on tablets. For the average user, the Modern UI is cumbersome and counter-intuitive on a traditional desktop. For a power user it's not that bad. I've been running the RP/RC/RTM versions since their respective launches as my primary OS at home. Not because I've enjoyed 8, but because I need to get familiar with it. Personally, I don't think it's that bad. I despised it at first and cursed all things Metro, but I quickly made some tweaks and adjustments and now I don't even notice a difference anymore--as far as accomplishing tasks go. To be fair, I've never liked any out-of-the-box installation of Windows, every one has required no less effort on my part to get it where I find it the most functional, so this is par for the course.

When I deploy Windows 8 on this network in October I will be doing so with Start8 included in every install. It's not a hack, it is a legitimate utility that will return the functionality of the start menu and boot straight to the desktop. These are things that have always existed in Windows. Take them away and it's not even Microsoft Windows anymore, it's simply Microsoft Metro with a Windows plug-in. I do not have the time or the patience to deal with teaching every person in this company about the Modern UI and dealing with their inevitable complaining. They don't pay me enough to deal with that, especially when there are such simple and effective alternatives.

TL;DR - "If you don't like 8 stay on 7" is a lame and uneducated argument. There is more to Windows 8 then just a UI change. The pros of upgrading outweigh the cons. There are many more facets to consider in the business environment then in the home when upgrading an OS is concerned.

Dean Wagner said,
No offense....

Well, you failed, cause you are dismissive and condescending, and amazingly, factually incorrect on most of your points.

I feel sorry for your employer, as they are not getting their money's worth.

Dean Wagner said,

The negative aspect is simply that it is designed to run on tablets. For the average user, the Modern UI is cumbersome and counter-intuitive on a traditional desktop

Really? Yet every set of testing has proved otherwise, so you are still pulling this crap out of your Ass, and your company and its employees are the ones suffering from your ignorance.

thenetavenger said,

Really? Yet every set of testing has proved otherwise, so you are still pulling this crap out of your Ass, and your company and its employees are the ones suffering from your ignorance.

in my IT department, we have already deployed test systems to some users with windows 8 RTM and they HATED it, 20 RTM win 8 systems put out as a test all new hardware, and out of the 20 systems, 18 users requested a rollback to windows 7, 2 actually asked if they could just stay on windows xp (not all users where on 7)... they hate the start screen, and a couple of users said this new way "slows them down".. these are people that work in Office all day and custom 3rd party apps... if it slowed them down, they would tell us and they did say it does... so this is coming from real world user tests... after this we have decided not to move to windows 8, we have been considering it for a while, thought no for a bit during the Dev Preview, then decided to do this 20 system trail just to see how users reacted...

btw training them before they got the systems in place was like pulling teeth... we aren't talking 20 some year olds, we are talking people in their 30s and 50s here

Dean Wagner said,
No offense, but your comment sounds like the usual complete nonsense to me. I hear/read this same argument all the time and it is becoming tiresome. Windows 8 is not Windows 7 + Modern UI. There have been a lot of changes under the hood. Out of all the changes made to 8, ones involving or relating to the Modern UI make up about 30% of them--of course, I'm pulling that number out of thin air, but you get my point. With that in mind, why would a person/business not want to utilize the 70% of great improvements because of the 30% of unfavorable UI changes? Especially when there are tools out there that will allow you to take advantage of all the positive changes while ignoring the negative ones?

Furthermore, it is obvious you are not a business. A business isn't one single hive-minded entity. A business is made up by a large number of people from all walks of life and extremely varying degrees of computer experience. As shocking as this may come to someone who frequents technology news sites, there are people out there who hate computers. *gasp* They use them at work because they have to, but at home a lot of people don't even own them. They know enough to do their job, but they have no interest in learning any more than that. A lot of these same people are older and have been doing things a certain way for a long time and are resistant to change. Imagine these people coming into work and booting up their PCs to find a fresh Windows 8 install after they've been using XP for the past decade. Better yet, imagine being the guy responsible for Windows 8 being on their computer and for making sure they know how to use it.

I run the IT department for a company who manufactures aircraft parts, mostly for military contractors. The guys in the shop are damn good at working with metal. They use a lot of computer-ran equipment, but outside of configuring that equipment to accomplish a task, they couldn't care less about that computer or have less of a desire to spend any more time on it then they have to. There are receptionists, sales staff, shipping/receiving, inventory control, and executives that have all settled into a routine that they'd rather not have interrupted. None of these people are going to be bouncing in their chairs and clapping their hands in anticipation of getting a new OS.

On the other side of the coin, I'm dealing with tight budgets, decade-old equipment, increased security risks, constant repairs, and a plethora of other problems. The cost involved (as far as workstations go) in migrating over from Windows XP to Windows 8 is a fraction of what it would cost to move to Windows 7. Every proposal I've made to go from XP to 7 has been shot down due to the price involved in replacing so many workstations. So, for someone who feels much like The Little Dutch Boy, Windows 8 is a blessing and a curse at the same time.

The positive aspect is the fact that it is designed to run on 32-bit tablets with limited resources. That makes the ability to get it running on some of these older computers very enticing. Couple that with its extremely affordable upgrade cost at launch and it is hard to ignore. To go from XP to 8 it is just a matter of an upgrade license and some more RAM. All the workstations here are running 32-bit dual-core 2-3GHz processors. Max out the RAM to 4GB and they will be able to handle Windows 8 all day long. With all of these factors, making the move from XP to 8 is almost unavoidable. That's not an accident, either, that's by design.

The negative aspect is simply that it is designed to run on tablets. For the average user, the Modern UI is cumbersome and counter-intuitive on a traditional desktop. For a power user it's not that bad. I've been running the RP/RC/RTM versions since their respective launches as my primary OS at home. Not because I've enjoyed 8, but because I need to get familiar with it. Personally, I don't think it's that bad. I despised it at first and cursed all things Metro, but I quickly made some tweaks and adjustments and now I don't even notice a difference anymore--as far as accomplishing tasks go. To be fair, I've never liked any out-of-the-box installation of Windows, every one has required no less effort on my part to get it where I find it the most functional, so this is par for the course.

When I deploy Windows 8 on this network in October I will be doing so with Start8 included in every install. It's not a hack, it is a legitimate utility that will return the functionality of the start menu and boot straight to the desktop. These are things that have always existed in Windows. Take them away and it's not even Microsoft Windows anymore, it's simply Microsoft Metro with a Windows plug-in. I do not have the time or the patience to deal with teaching every person in this company about the Modern UI and dealing with their inevitable complaining. They don't pay me enough to deal with that, especially when there are such simple and effective alternatives.

TL;DR - "If you don't like 8 stay on 7" is a lame and uneducated argument. There is more to Windows 8 then just a UI change. The pros of upgrading outweigh the cons. There are many more facets to consider in the business environment then in the home when upgrading an OS is concerned.

Actually, it is not designed as a tablet OS - it simply *looks* that way. Yes - Windows 8's UI and UX borrows a *lot* from Android and iOS (due to supported-formfactor overlap) because it has to - if you are going to support tablets (x86 or otherwise) you need far better support (and native support) than Windows 7 has - haven't we *all* complained, and incessantly, about overlays that are manufacturer-specific or carrier-specific on smartphones running Android? Samsung HAD to do the same thing with the Series 7 tablet (which shipped running Windows 7+ SP1) - with Windows 8, that need goes away. Since the Consumer Preview of Windows 8, I've been running it as either sole OS or in dual-boot with 8 Server/Server 2012, and on a desktop - that means keyboard, mouse, and no touch, and I don't have a lick of trouble. While I run a grand total of ONE WinRT app, that's due to app quality being sub-par at present (which is actually expected - 1.0 application quality for a new API, regardless of platform, is often poor - the same has been true of Android or iOS, and it was true of Win32 eighteen years ago). Practically ALL the hatred/criticism/angst concerning Windows is UI/UX driven - it's too different from what folks have had seventeen years to get used to. (That is how long the Start menu has been around.) Never mind that the Start menu itself isn't perfect - far from it. Never mind that it being gone means exactly nothing as far as applications/games/insert-name-of-software-here (the only applications, games, or anything else I did NOT bring with me were mooted by OS-included features). The Start menu isn't there, and that is enough excuse for folks to hate it.

neufuse said,

in my IT department, we have already deployed test systems to some users with windows 8 RTM and they HATED it, 20 RTM win 8 systems put out as a test all new hardware, and out of the 20 systems, 18 users requested a rollback to windows 7, 2 actually asked if they could just stay on windows xp (not all users where on 7)... they hate the start screen, and a couple of users said this new way "slows them down".. these are people that work in Office all day and custom 3rd party apps... if it slowed them down, they would tell us and they did say it does... so this is coming from real world user tests... after this we have decided not to move to windows 8, we have been considering it for a while, thought no for a bit during the Dev Preview, then decided to do this 20 system trail just to see how users reacted...

btw training them before they got the systems in place was like pulling teeth... we aren't talking 20 some year olds, we are talking people in their 30s and 50s here

Out of curiosity. How long of an adjustment period did you give them, and how did you "train" the test group?

Dean Wagner said,

I run the IT department for a company who manufactures aircraft parts, mostly for military contractors. The guys in the shop are damn good at working with metal. They use a lot of computer-ran equipment, but outside of configuring that equipment to accomplish a task, they couldn't care less about that computer or have less of a desire to spend any more time on it then they have to. There are receptionists, sales staff, shipping/receiving, inventory control, and executives that have all settled into a routine that they'd rather not have interrupted. None of these people are going to be bouncing in their chairs and clapping their hands in anticipation of getting a new OS.

On the other side of the coin, I'm dealing with tight budgets, decade-old equipment, increased security risks, constant repairs, and a plethora of other problems. The cost involved (as far as workstations go) in migrating over from Windows XP to Windows 8 is a fraction of what it would cost to move to Windows 7. Every proposal I've made to go from XP to 7 has been shot down due to the price involved in replacing so many workstations. So, for someone who feels much like The Little Dutch Boy, Windows 8 is a blessing and a curse at the same time.

For most aircraft, cost isn't the biggest issue alone - compromises are always made. Another big issue is reliability. Although we know Windows 7 to be more efficient for the average home user than say XP, in the aircraft industry, efficiency isn't as big as reliability. They will always go with the tried and tested method, so once it works, they'll stick with the systems for 10 or 20 years. They probably have Windows 95 based systems (or even older) still running on aircraft, simple because they work and they know enough about them so that redundancies are in place and failure is highly unlikely. The problem with new operating systems is that they don't have any prior information, nothing to base it on, and thus it is harder to pass FARs and other certifications. That is why it took so long for us to get full composite aircraft. Just a tidbit sorry.

neufuse said,

in my IT department, we have already deployed test systems to some users with windows 8 RTM and they HATED it, 20 RTM win 8 systems put out as a test all new hardware, and out of the 20 systems, 18 users requested a rollback to windows 7, 2 actually asked if they could just stay on windows xp (not all users where on 7)... they hate the start screen, and a couple of users said this new way "slows them down".. these are people that work in Office all day and custom 3rd party apps... if it slowed them down, they would tell us and they did say it does... so this is coming from real world user tests... after this we have decided not to move to windows 8, we have been considering it for a while, thought no for a bit during the Dev Preview, then decided to do this 20 system trail just to see how users reacted...

btw training them before they got the systems in place was like pulling teeth... we aren't talking 20 some year olds, we are talking people in their 30s and 50s here

1. How did you train them?
2. How do currently launch applications on Windows 7? Start menu? Desktop? Pin to taskbar?
3. Why do they "hate it"?
4. Why does it slow them down? How does it slow them down?
5. What are you using to measure improvements (if any)?

It's meaningless to say "hate" and "slow down" without at least some qualitative explanation and maybe some quantitative measurements.

neufuse said,

in my IT department, we have already deployed test systems to some users with windows 8 RTM and they HATED it, 20 RTM win 8 systems put out as a test all new hardware, and out of the 20 systems, 18 users requested a rollback to windows 7, 2 actually asked if they could just stay on windows xp (not all users where on 7)... they hate the start screen, and a couple of users said this new way "slows them down"..

I call your BS on your post. If you think 30 - 40 year olds are hard to train on a new system then obviously you're either lying or you're company should really look into replacing you with someone who is competent.

The age group your are referring to has had to transition through DOS based software all they way to windows 7 in their lifetime. the average 20 something year old working today (Provided they actually went on to post secondary education) has been working with what.. Windows XP - Win 7 at most.
Nice try dude.. nice try.. Go troll somewhere else.. or get your company to spring for some real training instead of one of those self certification books.