Windows 8 has five times less pre-release users than Windows 7

Bill Gates is definitely excited about Windows 8, but the rest of the world might not be – compared to Windows 7, Microsoft’s new OS is seeing far lower pre-release usage stats. And that’s a bad sign in itself, since it gives us an idea of how excited users are to get their hands on the new OS.

Alright, so Windows 8 isn’t even out yet – it shouldn’t matter how many people are using it, right? Well, that’s true to an extent, but a whopping 1.64% of Windows users felt like installing a pre-release version of Windows 7 a month before it was released. Compared to that, only about 0.33% of users are running Windows 8; five times less. To put that in perspective, Windows 7 already had as many users as Windows 8 six months before release.

Again, this doesn’t mean that a lot (read: most) of users are necessarily going to skip Windows 8. Tablets, paired with insanely cheap upgrade costs, just might save it. But it’s still a worrying sign, and you can bet that Microsoft is anxiously watching these numbers as the days until release tick away. Then we’ll really see what the world thinks of Windows 8.

Source: Computer World

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Review: Motorola RAZR V

Next Story

StatCounter and Net Applications still disagree on IE vs Chrome

112 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

"Across all the milestones we've announced for this reimagined version of the world's best-selling operating system - Windows 8 is the most widely used and tested pre-release product we've ever delivered. Across every audience, Windows 8 has been downloaded and used by more people than Windows 7 during the same period. A billion hours of feedback telemetry has been collected from all our pre-releases combined."

- http://windowsteamblog.com/win...4/21-days-and-counting.aspx

Unless you are from Russia, and/or arrogant, and like child's toys, or USA based, It's gonna fail....sorry.

Edited by scaramonga, Oct 4 2012, 2:45am :

Maybe this has something to do with the fact that Windows 7 was a replacement for a turd, so many were eager to get their hands on it. Windows 7 is an excellent OS. Windows 8 might also be excellent but so what. Windows 7 ain't broke so few will want to fix it.

The same people, the same faces, praising Win8, are the same people, same faces, who praised Vista to the hilt. Nothing would make them say otherwise, and so nothing is going to make them say otherwise regarding this obvious failure. But they will all quietly slip away once the inevitable happens, and once again, bow their heads in shame at how wrong they were, privately, of course.

scaramonga said,
The same people, the same faces, praising Win8, are the same people, same faces, who praised Vista to the hilt.

Quite the generalization there. I for one hated Vista with a passion when it was first released, yet I like 8. (Granted, Vista's better with the service packs, but RTM sucked.) I've adapted and am rather happy with the new interface, yet if I wanted to I can plop in the Windows 7 shell and go along my way as before while taking advantage of the under-the-hood improvements. Works great either way, with or without the Modern bits.

If anyone finds this surprising, just remember the Win7 timeframe.

The world was scared away from Vista and was eager to get rolling with the next generation that wasn't Vista.

Vista wasn't as horrible as the world had people believing, but a large segment avoid it completely, which is why Win7's product date was moved up.

So of course people were needing 'beyond xp' and were afraid or assumed Vista was crap, so their 'venturing' past XP was Win7.

Right now Win7 is rock solid, and great OS. Windows 8 is better and the next evolution, but it is not as 'needed' for the majority of users that would normally spend time on preview releases.

Not surprise me. The fact is that at this time the W7, especially in 64-bit is extremely stable and reliable. They will not be easy to change to W8. Regards.

I been saying it the whole time.. Windows 8 will be the biggest flop in tech history.. The OS is plum f'ing retarded from the inside out

I think Microsoft would have a winner if they'd left the Start Menu for tablets and just given the desktop a Metro look. Combined with the under the hood improvements, they would've had a real winner. As it is, things are a mess.

Lies... damn lies... and statistics.

1. People hated Vista, hence they were extra excited about Windows 7. So what?

2. 1.64% of what? 0.33% of what? There's no context to either number. Unless the total Windows user base was exactly the same then as it is now, which is unlikely.

3. Most of the prerelease software is only available to users who download it to a second computer in their free time, or is available through expensive subscriptions to MSDN or TechNet. In case nobody here remembered, the economy is bad and a lot of people are either out of work or under-employed. The same goes for businesses themselves who may not be as eager to spend money on a new OS at this time.

4. Who cares either way? What if Windows 7 sells 1 billion copies, and Windows 8 ends up selling 750 million copies? (I just made those numbers up to make the point.) Does it really matter? If Microsoft makes a profit on Windows 8... if consumers are free to choose between Windows 7 or Windows 8 and be happy with that choice... if Microsoft gains a foothold into touch-friendly OSes and sets the stage to compete better against iOS and Android... it's a win for everybody. It's even a win for those who hate Microsoft, because competition makes everyone better.

It would be funny if Windows 8 did so badly that Microsoft was forced to reverse course and go back to the desktop paradigm for Windows 9

off course windows 7 was eagerly anticipated as the cure for vista. windows 8 is eagerly anticipated as the migration away from pcs and into tablets for the majority of consumers that need to bridge the x86 gap while they move on. so far ios and android are non starters since they are unable to be proper pc replacements.

so windows 8 will take off once its true purpose is and that is without question, the post-pc era of tablets as content production devices. not merely ios/android toys to watch movies on.

I haven't touched windows 8 either because it is made for a touch screen and I don't have one !! Most PC screens are not touch orientated so what's the use.
Now when all the tablets come out now that's a different kettle of fish !!!
Then lots of people will go for windows 8 ....especially ....surface !!

minoskid said,
Wait for the official release, then we'll see if Windows 8 is failure.

You want to say public release... Oficially it was launched already...

eiffel_g said,

You want to say public release... Oficially it was launched already...

I want to say, when Windows 8 hit in the stores (October 26, 2012)

Tablets will be the big driver here. Most company MD's I speak to want tablets that have office and are able to print at home and work. Win8 big tick. I've been testing it since it first came out and been using win 8 as my daily driver since rp. Now in rtm I couldn't go back.

Doesn't surprise me. It's scary to some people. It'll take a while but it'll get warmed up to by most I think. Change scares people.

Let me put a little thought in this stupid comparison.
After RTM, anyone could install Windows 7 XYZ edition without a product key and delay activation until they could buy it.
After RTM, Windows 8 won't install without a product key and all non-MSDN etc legal users need to wait for release day

guess which one will have more marketshare?

dumb article is dumb.

BajiRav said,
Let me put a little thought in this stupid comparison.
...After RTM, Windows 8 won't install without a product key and all non-MSDN etc legal users need to wait for release day
...

You can install Enterprise Trial. Using Re-Arm you have 180 days of use. If you like it.

I have installed, and forgot it. Even from those low percents of users having installed Windows 8, can someone tell how many have delete the install, or "forget" about it ? if thinking so, there are even fewer running installations.

I still haven't made the upgrade for all my machines to Windows 7 yet, give me a chance

I am considering an upgrade to my HTPC though to windows 8

Windows 8 is wasted on my desktop. I rarely go to the start screen, I use no Metro Apps apart from weather on my start but I never have to go there as I launch my commonly used apps from the taskbar. Searching for apps/files is a broken experience since I have to use the full screen start screen.... this makes no sense on a desktop. It's stupid. I wouldn't use it if I didn't get MSDN from work. The core windows updates etc are nice, but the design isn't. When I search for stuff I don't want it full screen looking like it should be on a phone, I want a small search box window.

Also, the charms bar is WTF, really.

SPARTdAN said,
Windows 8 is wasted on my desktop. I rarely go to the start screen, I use no Metro Apps apart from weather on my start but I never have to go there as I launch my commonly used apps from the taskbar. Searching for apps/files is a broken experience since I have to use the full screen start screen.... this makes no sense on a desktop. It's stupid. I wouldn't use it if I didn't get MSDN from work. The core windows updates etc are nice, but the design isn't. When I search for stuff I don't want it full screen looking like it should be on a phone, I want a small search box window.

Also, the charms bar is WTF, really.

Explain how the 1/4 Popup Start Menu was easier/worked better and wasn't broken? How does popping put a box about 1/4 of the screen size versus the full screen size break searching or how the basic functionality of how the Start Menu/Screen works?

Trust me, there is none. The only thing I will give you, is tapping the Windows key and typing defaults to Apps only and you have to arrow down once for settings or twice for documents. And this can be circumvented by using the new Win+F to go directly to File search, etc.

You can also search inside Online Apps now, which doesn't exist anywhere else but on the Xbox.

You are straw grasping and not breaking yourself of an old pattern that people that use computers less and understand less about them will not have to 'break' and do better with Windows 8 than you are doing.

Try to break your pattern that keeps you from moving on to the new way of thinking about things. If not you will either be left behind or will be install FileManager on the StarTrek Enterprise because that talking and 'adaptive' understanding computer crap is stupid.

I'm using & loving it! There's less hype about it since Windows 7 was a success story and works pretty well which makes updating kind of unnecessary..

The arrangement is different with Windows 8 since its predecessor isn't long bashed Vista but praised Windows 7. With Vista people were like rats on a sinking boat, desperately trying to ditch it. Now their boat isn't sinking and they just don't want to leave their comfy cruise on a Windows 7 "yacht."

Yet I find myself even more comfortable on a Win8 boat.

I was very enthusiastic for Windows 7 I have to say, but can't say I've got anywhere near the same enthusiasm for Windows 8. I tried the release previews and thanks to MSDN at work downloaded and tried the finished product.. and frankly I just don't get it.

I'm not going to attempt to predict the future but unless Microsoft are really stubborn and bullheaded I can't help but think there is going to be a user backlash against this new Start screen. The sad thing is that Windows 8 does feel even quicker than Windows 7 with some nice optimisations, but I'm put off enough with some of the other things (including the aforementioned Start screen) to steer well clear of it.

I applaud Microsoft for trying something different, and being brave enough to do it with their core product.. but I honestly can't applaud their implementation of it. I think it's a horror show.

Chicane-UK said,
I was very enthusiastic for Windows 7 I have to say, but can't say I've got anywhere near the same enthusiasm for Windows 8. I tried the release previews and thanks to MSDN at work downloaded and tried the finished product.. and frankly I just don't get it.

I'm not going to attempt to predict the future but unless Microsoft are really stubborn and bullheaded I can't help but think there is going to be a user backlash against this new Start screen. The sad thing is that Windows 8 does feel even quicker than Windows 7 with some nice optimisations, but I'm put off enough with some of the other things (including the aforementioned Start screen) to steer well clear of it.

I applaud Microsoft for trying something different, and being brave enough to do it with their core product.. but I honestly can't applaud their implementation of it. I think it's a horror show.

To people that haven't built a belief system, Windows 8 will not be as 'troubling' as the people that hate it without understanding it or capable of evolving to the next step in how to think about something as simple as the Start Screen just being a big Start Menu.

When IT staff issues a memo, or they tell grandma: "The new Start Menu is now full screen so it can do more, but works the same." People will be fine with this, especially when they are comfortable with some of the VERY SAME full screen and 'Home Screen' concepts on their Android and iPhone already.

Take an extra minute to give a quick Demo of the same search features already in the Start Menu and explain 'Grouping' is the new 'folders', and offer a couple of minutes explaining the corner navigation and even the mouse swipe gestures that make it even faster to get around and people do just fine with it.

We have done several tests on this, and my latest was leaving a Win8 notebook(non-touch) for my 60 year old family member. She wanted to check facebook, get her email and whatever, I handed her the Windows 8 notebook, with only a Guest account available.

I had to run errands, and was gone for about 25 minutes and was truly shocked that she was ok. She had checked her email, facebook, wrote a fax in Word that she printed to a home network printer the Windows 8 notebook had never seen before, played Zumba on the desktop and was finishing up her Farmville.

I expected her to get email and maybe struggle to get the other things she needed.

When I asked her if she had any problems, she said, "Not really, it took me a few seconds to realize the corners were how I navigated around, but after that it all made sense."


So trust people that do study this stuff, including Microsoft, that End users will no longer care how BIG the Start 'Menu/Screen' is and go on with their normal work, and dabble in the new Apps that they enjoy on their phones already.

People that can't 'click their minds' around the fact the Start Screen is just a big Start Menu are the ones having problems, and sadly it is some of the modern technical people that often get stuck in a mindset or pattern because they work in the pattern so much everyday.

As history has taught us, hard core and old time users are sometimes the hardest to move on to new concepts that make things easier for them, and they flat out reject the change.

For example, when end users were comfortably moving to Windows95, tech people were still showing people how to boot to DOS inside Win95 and how to run Program Manager and FileManger.

Some of these people to this day STILL have a problem with the document model of Win95 and burry themselves in folder trees in Explorer that is a waste of time. So if the docucentric model was hard for them, the Metro/Modern model is 'fruit loops' to them.

You can find the same 'lock' in pattern thinking in various industries, but technology is one of the hardest to get people to break and move forward. Look at the 'love' for *nix OS models, and monolithic kernel designs, and even Mach kernel designs or BSD kernel interfaces that are revered today. All of these were outdated in the late 80s, and replace by far more power, elegant and easier model and technologies. Yet Linux is still here, OS X was revamp in 2000 by shoving outdated 1970/80s Unix under it.

Why? Because they are comfortable and easy to understand. Teaching generic I/O and streams and char based parameter communications is simple. Teaching full Object based OS models with the ability morph an understand classes and properties instead of calling functions is a bit more work at first, but pays off in the long run.

Edited by thenetavenger, Oct 2 2012, 5:50pm :

"Windows 8 has five times less pre-release users than Windows 7"
Fewer. Five times fewer.
Seriously, doesn't anybody care about grammar anymore?

eiffel_g said,
Waiting Windows 9 - with Start menu....

yup, you'll get it back along with the classic theme, aero glass and dreamscene so do wait please it's totally NOT pointless

It makes sense to me only because of Vista. As soon as 7 went to Beta I took Vista off and installed 7. It was so stable, I never went back. But Windows 7 is so good, there's not as much of a compelling reason to replace it with Windows 8, especially given the bad publicity it has been given - something that did not exist for Windows 7.

Heck, did Windows 7 get any bad press? It was faster than Vista on the same hardware, and touted as being what Vista should have been but wasn't. With that kind of positive spin for 7 3 years ago, and the overall negativity toward Windows 8, it's no surprise there's not as big a pick up.

Frankly, even people that I convinced to install 7 and remove Vista, I would not necessarily do the same from 7 to Windows 8. If they're only using a PC, there's not a real good reason to install 8. Having said that, I like Windows 8. A lot.

I am running Windows 8 Pro, but I am just not enthused about it. I guess its because I have it installed on traditional form factors. If I get a decently priced Tablet with it, then I will probably be more enthused.

Mr. Dee said,
I am running Windows 8 Pro, but I am just not enthused about it. I guess its because I have it installed on traditional form factors. If I get a decently priced Tablet with it, then I will probably be more enthused.

Same here, a lot of small things bug me in Windows 8. I use it at home, however when i go to work and use Windows 7 it feels like an upgrade from Windows 8.

On a tablet it should be pretty good, once the marketplace has matured and lots of quality apps and games exist.

InsaneNutter said,

Same here, a lot of small things bug me in Windows 8. I use it at home, however when i go to work and use Windows 7 it feels like an upgrade from Windows 8.

On a tablet it should be pretty good, once the marketplace has matured and lots of quality apps and games exist.

What is it that annoys you about W8? I use it on my desktop and tablet at home and when I come to work and use Windows 7 I get frustrated with the less useful task manager, inability to pause file transfers, better multi screen support (I use DisplayFusion but occasionally it misbehaves).

Might be because I'm in IT and use my computer to manage servers etc so take advantage of a bunch of under-the-hood advantages.

wow, comparing percentages without numbers... Computerworld is an idiot to do such an article but congrats to Tyler for bringing it here WITHOUT POINTING OUT that it's utter crap - i mean really, how retard you must be to think that X% of early adopters (of Win7 in 2009) == X% of early adopters (of Win8 in 2012)... yeah guys, the world population just freezed in 2009, user numbers are exactly the same, no new computers have been sold etc.

jeez, do these people have the iq of Forrest Gump?

That's because Windows 7 RC was almost exactly like and as good as Windows 7 RTM. Windows 8 RP is an incomplete piece of junk compared to the RTM. I'd be using Windows 8 RTM already if Microsoft didn't needlessly make it inaccessible to 98% of users for 2 months after it RTMed.

No surprising. Don't think it will be a failure, but don't think it's going to be much of a hit in the desktop market.

Sadly, I was added to those statistics in Windows 8 usage, even though I have no intention of purchasing or using it. so minus me from those stats. I am completely uninterested in what it has to offer.

JaredFrost said,
Sadly, I was added to those statistics in Windows 8 usage, even though I have no intention of purchasing or using it. so minus me from those stats. I am completely uninterested in what it has to offer.

Yep,
Same here. I'm using Windows 8 right now, and although I haven't had any issues with it, I have absolutely NO intentions of buying it, even for only $40!!

If MS wants to be like Linux and try to force people to upgrade every 6 months (at least it feels like only 6 months) I'll just keep waiting until my machines are totally broke down before upgrading!

What is the source of your statistics? Is it possible that they used IE as the basis of those stats? If so, IE is hardly a measure of whether a OS is being used or not, with a significant numbers using Chrome or Firefox (especially with those early adopters).

Could it also be that Vista was such a poorly received product that everyone was itching to get off it, even if it was to a pre-release.

Andrew

For a moment there I thought of trying it out, despite unliking the new interface.
BUT.. the CPU restrictions wouldn't even allow to install it.
I'm not gonna spend a fortune on new PC just for a Tablet OS.
Well.. I guess I will stick with XP forever.

Gopal Chavan said,
For a moment there I thought of trying it out, despite unliking the new interface.
BUT.. the CPU restrictions wouldn't even allow to install it.
I'm not gonna spend a fortune on new PC just for a Tablet OS.
Well.. I guess I will stick with XP forever.

Still on XP? I don't think you're the intended target market.

Gopal Chavan said,
For a moment there I thought of trying it out, despite unliking the new interface.
BUT.. the CPU restrictions wouldn't even allow to install it.
I'm not gonna spend a fortune on new PC just for a Tablet OS.
Well.. I guess I will stick with XP forever.

WOw, how old is your PC?

The problem is that there is not Windows tablet available on the market yet. So, I have just installed Win8 on Vmware running under Mac. I will upgrade to Win8 asap as the right hardware is available. That's why the install base is so low right now. We don't have the right hardware. So everyone is tinkering with the new OS and waiting for the hardware to come. It would be really nice if the new Office is released simultaneously to Win8.

Pravin Nowbuth said,
The problem is that there is not Windows tablet available on the market yet. So, I have just installed Win8 on Vmware running under Mac. I will upgrade to Win8 asap as the right hardware is available. That's why the install base is so low right now. We don't have the right hardware. So everyone is tinkering with the new OS and waiting for the hardware to come. It would be really nice if the new Office is released simultaneously to Win8.

While I don't want to defend windows 8 in any shape or form, I will say that there are windows tablets on the market that run windows 8 just fine and still give you the tablet experience.

warwagon said,

While I don't want to defend windows 8 in any shape or form, I will say that there are windows tablets on the market that run windows 8 just fine and still give you the tablet experience.

Not really. All the Windows 7-based tablets out there can't compare with the upcoming tablets/convertibles that are coming these holidays (e.g. Surface). People are most likely holding out for one of those new ones than buying a Win7 tablet now and installing Win8 over it.

pikablu0530 said,

Not really. All the Windows 7-based tablets out there can't compare with the upcoming tablets/convertibles that are coming these holidays (e.g. Surface). People are most likely holding out for one of those new ones than buying a Win7 tablet now and installing Win8 over it.

I've been using Windows 8 on my Samsung 7 Slate for over half a year now and even though it doesn't have any of the awesome convertible features the new form factors boast it's excellent at showing off Windows 8's touch features.

Every single person that has seen it has been blown away by its performance, fluidity and ability to run actual desktop applications as fast as a regular computer.

Of course windows 8 has less pre release users, TechNet dropped keys from 10 keys with 10 activations, to 3 keys and 5 activations. a lot of people missed out this time cause their friends couldn't spare the keys. that's how I see it.

Kratzie said,
Of course windows 8 has less pre release users, TechNet dropped keys from 10 keys with 10 activations, to 3 keys and 5 activations. a lot of people missed out this time cause their friends couldn't spare the keys. that's how I see it.

Except the TechNet keys we are using give us access to the RTM version, not the pre-release versions this "study" refers to.

Kratzie said,
Of course windows 8 has less pre release users, TechNet dropped keys from 10 keys with 10 activations, to 3 keys and 5 activations. a lot of people missed out this time cause their friends couldn't spare the keys. that's how I see it.

and other major thing was Windows 7 could be installed without a product key. Dumb analysis is dumb.

BajiRav said,

and other major thing was Windows 7 could be installed without a product key. Dumb analysis is dumb.

I Stand Corrected... FW...

Windows 8 and Office 2013 mark the beginning of the end for Microsoft. It's almost as if competitors infiltrated this company's top levels of management to bring it down from the inside by pushing it to design and release terrible, terrible products.

sabrex said,
Windows 8 and Office 2013 mark the beginning of the end for Microsoft. It's almost as if competitors infiltrated this company's top levels of management to bring it down from the inside by pushing it to design and release terrible, terrible products.

Hahaha. Right.

sabrex said,
Windows 8 and Office 2013 mark the beginning of the end for Microsoft. It's almost as if competitors infiltrated this company's top levels of management to bring it down from the inside by pushing it to design and release terrible, terrible products.

*facepalm*

Am I right in assuming that percentages != numbers? doesn't it all depend on how fast Windows as a whole is growing? like, if the # of Windows PCs grew 5x over that period then it would be equal.

Also, couldn't it be that more people wanted to switch to Windows 7 because it was a stable OS much better than the last one, and less to Windows 8 just because Win7 is still working fine?

Your math needs some work here...unless the number of windows users during the w7 beta is the same as the number of windows users during the w8 beta, drawing a comparison of percentages in this manner is misleading.

I remember installing Windows 7 pre-release and knowing that this OS is going to be special. Windows 8 on the other hand, I dont care to give an honest opinion anymore because people will shoot it down, but i will place all my reasoning behind the assumption that it will be a huge failure.

The problem with Windows 8 as I see it: There is no compelling driver for power users of desktop workstations to consider this.

I get that some people have found it to be good, and that's great. And I do like the technology behind the scenes. But I count myself amongst the people who look at Metro and see it as an obstacle to productivity. It feels like something that is good for kiosks and presentation, but it denies its very namesake -- where are the metro "Windows"? There are none, I am forced into a paradigm that I find unhelpful or not useful on large multimonitor displays.

And the idea that applications are going solely metro sickens me. I like Windows, and I like Windows within Windows... call me crazy but the Metro interface seems just completely and totally wrong and a huge disservice to desktop PC owners -- not to mention a huge waste of screen real estate.

I hope Microsoft improves on this, I really do.

jimmyfal said,
Have you tried clicking the desktop Icon?

Doesn't change the fact that a lot of people feel like its just a bad design choice to force desktop users to take an extra click to do anything useful.

THolman said,

Doesn't change the fact that a lot of people feel like its just a bad design choice to force desktop users to take an extra click to do anything useful.

Want to use the start menu in Windows 7? Click it.
Want to use the desktop in Windows 8? Click it.

Extra click...where?

jimmyfal said,
Have you tried clicking the desktop Icon?

MS should have tried making actual desktop OS, instead of ruiling windows by forcing tablet interface

mram said,
The problem with Windows 8 as I see it: There is no compelling driver for power users of desktop workstations to consider this.

I get that some people have found it to be good, and that's great. And I do like the technology behind the scenes. But I count myself amongst the people who look at Metro and see it as an obstacle to productivity. It feels like something that is good for kiosks and presentation, but it denies its very namesake -- where are the metro "Windows"? There are none, I am forced into a paradigm that I find unhelpful or not useful on large multimonitor displays.

And the idea that applications are going solely metro sickens me. I like Windows, and I like Windows within Windows... call me crazy but the Metro interface seems just completely and totally wrong and a huge disservice to desktop PC owners -- not to mention a huge waste of screen real estate.

I hope Microsoft improves on this, I really do.

I'm a power user and I think Windows 8 is great. Win+X menu is awesome, new explorer and file copying is awesome, and new task manager is awesome. It in no way hinders my ability to be productive.

I think this is entirely because Windows 8 is currently impossible to crack/activate and people don't want to install a 180 day trial.

a1ien said,
I think this is entirely because Windows 8 is currently impossible to crack/activate and people don't want to install a 180 day trial.

That is incorrect. There are KMS based activation workarounds for Windows 8. Yes, the activation is valid only for 180 days.

Honestly, it's probably for the better. I remember using Windows 7 with much enthusiasm during the leaked milestone build, and then the beta. By the time it got to the RC stage and then RTM, it became a bit meh for me when Windows 7 hit mainstream.

For Windows 8 I couldn't stand it at all during the previews, yet somehow the RTM build is alright.

This makes sense to me. Windows 7 was a remarkably stable OS, even in it's first beta, and it was replacing a craptastic OS.

Windows 8 has had multiple betas, and it's not solving any problem (for desktop PC's). I'll be updating ASAP, but I'm not about to install 4 OS's in 6 months just to try out a UI that's lifeless without any apps.

Sotto_Zero said,
Unfair comparison.

It is not that everyone wanted Windows 7 then. Everybody wanted out of Vista!

Not true, I had ZERO issues with Vista, Windows 7 just offered new features that people actually wanted and made sense.

Sotto_Zero said,
Unfair comparison.

It is not that everyone wanted Windows 7 then. Everybody wanted out of Vista!


Using your argument you could then argue that people don't want Windows 8 so are happy to stick with Windows 7 hence the drop in numbers.

TheLegendOfMart said,

Using your argument you could then argue that people don't want Windows 8 so are happy to stick with Windows 7 hence the drop in numbers.

I'm quite happy to be stuck with 7 for the next 3 years actually, yes.

JaredFrost said,

Not true, I had ZERO issues with Vista, Windows 7 just offered new features that people actually wanted and made sense.

Vista had a bad reputation plus lots of people were still on XP so that helped 7's pre-release numbers. People are happy with 7 and not many people on OS's before 7 are ever going to upgrade.

Ive been using Windows 8 release preview and I havent had any issue with it. I understand others feel differently but Windows 8 hasnt stopped me from being productive at all.

As a percentage it's 5x worse, but what are the actual numbers? Maybe the user base is much bigger now, so a smaller percentage doesn't necessarily mean an equivalent drop off in the actual number of users.

itsthenewDC said,
As a percentage it's 5x worse, but what are the actual numbers? Maybe the user base is much bigger now, so a smaller percentage doesn't necessarily mean an equivalent drop off in the actual number of users.

Yep, that's what I was thinking.

itsthenewDC said,
As a percentage it's 5x worse, but what are the actual numbers? Maybe the user base is much bigger now, so a smaller percentage doesn't necessarily mean an equivalent drop off in the actual number of users.

I don't think it really matters. If we look at what people were upgrading from. Windows XP or Vista (!), then Windows 7 simply blew them away on features and performance.

Now, If you put that into context. People will be upgrading to Windows 8 from mostly XP and Windows 7. The windows XP users simply aren't going to change and the Windows 7 users have next to no reason to upgrade save for losing a start menu.

It makes sense that the only people upgrading to Windows 8 are tech users (developers and geeky people) and people who have MSDN/technet/dreamspark subs.

Also, Microsoft at this point for Windows 7 was doing a huge amount of free 1 month technet subs, pretty much giving away multiple copies of Windows 7.

makes sense. i probably wont even bother putting win8 on my desktop. but a win8 tablet I will have asap.

Gabe3 said,
makes sense. i probably wont even bother putting win8 on my desktop. but a win8 tablet I will have asap.

I think as soon as they start getting some awesome apps like Netflix and Skype for windows 8 people will start upgrading..

also a lot of people were very excited to get rid of windows xp but windows 7 is still awesome

Gabe3 said,
makes sense. i probably wont even bother putting win8 on my desktop. but a win8 tablet I will have asap.

doesn't suprise me, windows 8 will be a big faillure.

nekrosoft13 said,

doesn't suprise me, windows 8 will be a big faillure.


Can you also tell me what the winning numbers for the next mega millions lottery drawing will be as well, since you seem able to see the future?

nekrosoft13 said,

doesn't suprise me, windows 8 will be a big faillure.

Define "failure" - is it the "Vista sold 300+ million copies and it is a complete failure," the "OSX sold a couple dozen million and it is a runaway success," the "iPad sold 15 million so we are in the post-PC era," or the "1% of all desktop/laptop computer users use Linux, and it is the year of Linux" type of failure? We never hear what really defines failure, so it would help if you said exactly what you mean by "failure."

Lachlan said,

I think as soon as they start getting some awesome apps like Netflix and Skype for windows 8 people will start upgrading..

You mean awesome apps that can't do anything better than what already exists?

Metro apps are a joke... they're lacking features/customization and they're fullscreen. A website can do a better job than a metro app like Netflix

Gabe3 said,
makes sense. i probably wont even bother putting win8 on my desktop. but a win8 tablet I will have asap.

For $40 I'll put it on everything, seems incredibly stupid to not take advantage of the limited time offer. They are going to raise the cost to upgrade to $100-$200 in January.

Hello, 8 second boot times. Even if you are one of those people who can't deal with the start menu change, just get a free app to replace it.


You could upgrade at least 3 computers to Windows 8 this year for the cost of upgrading 1 next year.

Lachlan said,

I think as soon as they start getting some awesome apps like Netflix and Skype for windows 8 people will start upgrading..


Full screen Skype? My productivity is going to skyrocket...

nekrosoft13 said,

doesn't suprise me, windows 8 will be a big faillure.


The only failure i see is your writing

myxomatosis said,

You mean awesome apps that can't do anything better than what already exists?

Metro apps are a joke... they're lacking features/customization and they're fullscreen. A website can do a better job than a metro app like Netflix

Sorry, but I call nonsense.

Sure, current Metro apps are somewhat lacking, but Metro as a platform can do much much more than a website alone can do. And you know it.

nohone said,

Define "failure" - is it the "Vista sold 300+ million copies and it is a complete failure," the "OSX sold a couple dozen million and it is a runaway success," the "iPad sold 15 million so we are in the post-PC era," or the "1% of all desktop/laptop computer users use Linux, and it is the year of Linux" type of failure? We never hear what really defines failure, so it would help if you said exactly what you mean by "failure."

I guess it will more likely be "Microsoft's revenue and profit will be lower than their forecast and the company's stock will plummet because of Win8" kind of failure, or something.

Windows 8 = Microsoft 101. Release software that makes people go out and buy hardware (tablets in this case). Didn't work with Vista, won't work with Win 8.

nohone said,

Define "failure" - is it the "Vista sold 300+ million copies and it is a complete failure,

99.99% of those were bundled with new computers. VERY FEW people went out and bought it to replace XP.

myxomatosis said,

You mean awesome apps that can't do anything better than what already exists?

Metro apps are a joke... they're lacking features/customization and they're fullscreen. A website can do a better job than a metro app like Netflix

I agree there are many apps that lack functionality, but not all apps mimic websites. Many useful applications exist and it is still early in the process. The quality should improve,
That said, overall most apps seem geared more for tablets than desktops/laptops.

SharpGreen said,

Can you also tell me what the winning numbers for the next mega millions lottery drawing will be as well, since you seem able to see the future?

4, 8, 15, 16, 23, 42

Lachlan said,

I think as soon as they start getting some awesome apps like Netflix and Skype for windows 8 people will start upgrading..

OK.... so ... I can't use Netflix on Win7, and Skype is also an app that I've never used nor it never existed/was usable on - be it - XP, 7, 8 ?

fobban said,

Full screen Skype? My productivity is going to skyrocket...

You can't open Modern Skype then snap it to the side nxt to the desktop or another app?

Lachlan said,

I think as soon as they start getting some awesome apps like Netflix and Skype for windows 8 people will start upgrading..

Yeah, as a Windows 7 user I cannot wait until I can finally use Netflix and Skype...

nekrosoft13 said,

doesn't suprise me, windows 8 will be a big faillure.

My company has postponed an order for 150 new desktop PCs because we're waiting for the Windows 8 announcement. It's not the OS we're waiting for but the hundred or so new computer models that'll be announced alongside it.

By this time next year we'll have Windows Server 2013 with Lync and Sharepoint in our server farm. Every desktop will have Windows 8 PCs. Every briefcase will have Surface tablets running Windows 8 and every pocket will have Nokia phones running Windows 8. We'll have consistancy across every device in the operation (about 10,000). This is precisely what business has been waiting for for a very long time.

And while Netflix and Skype might be important for consumers they're not important for business. Failure? This must be something you know a lot about.