Windows 8 tablet interface shown off on video

Microsoft has been working hard on Windows 8 and is now putting all that hard work into a video series. Microsoft is kicking off a "Building Windows 8" series of videos and has posted the first one up on Youtube. You can view the video below that takes you through the thoughts and processes used when designing and building Windows 8.

The video below shows off the tablet interface but unfortunately it appears the embedding has been disabled. You can view this video by visiting this link.  The video shows many new features of the interface that Microsoft has built around its new UI.

 

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I just watched the presentation and... I think for the first time ever Microsoft might have one of the greatest operation systems ever created. Some of the features within the presentation was just mind blowing. Well I cannot wait to have this running on my system... although I think it will have to be a completely new rig setup for this one.

Looks good... However, I'm curious how do you choose which app you want to dock at the side? Apparently the side scrolling shows you one app at a time, so you'll have to keep scrolling till you get what you want. I certainly hope if there could be something like a taskbar where you can see everything that's running at one glance...

But the integration right now seems kinda weird. It's like 'old world' and 'new world' side by side. I don't see how mouse gestures would be as effective on such a UI...

In its current state, no matter what they say, I'd still think it's a layer on top of Windows. But hopefully in the coming year they integrate it so beautifully that its really part of it...

Wow, that made me SWEAR. This is so much prettier than OS X, seriously. I totally wowed when I saw a Windows 7 desktop fading from the Start screen and that got resized so effin' smoothly. I NEED this on my computer, seriously. I doubt they are gonna finish it in late 2012 ; )

Looks good but from the video it seems like a basic UI has been placed over Windows 7 and when you need to do anything technical you have to go back to the old UI and the old Explorer. I hope this is just because its early days. i hope they keep the codename.

Don't know why people keep calling this a layer on top of windows. It is part of windows just like Aero was part of windows. This is just taking it way further and fully implementing the Metro UI into windows whihc I'm very happy about.

Metro is the best most modern UI on the market and it is smart for MS to be using it as their unified GUI language over all their products.

Metro makes Andorid and IOS look old and dated in comparison.

TechieXP said,
This is going to all but kill iOS. Makes iOS and Android look like the toy it is.
Without a doubt.
iOS 5 can be anything, but it won't be bigger than this.

They can't be serious in saying that this is going to be the new UI for Desktops (towards the end of the video). That is going to suck so much. Hate this interface. I hope there's going to be a way to turn it off.

I Think The UI Will Be Able To Be Used With The Kinect Camera(With Higher DPI) In The Future, So The Mouse/Keyboard Will No Longer Be Necessary For Interaction With The Interface, Also Wouls Be Cool If They Could Use Existing Cameras For Gesture Recognition

Has anybody noticed how fast that thing is... I mean, it is using Windows Aero + The interface... I know it can be less resource than Media Center.... But man!

Jose_49 said,
Has anybody noticed how fast that thing is... I mean, it is using Windows Aero + The interface... I know it can be less resource than Media Center.... But man!

It has a 6 second boot-up time, and instantaneously awakes from sleep.

i still think this is a huge gamble microsoft is taking by almost totally changing the user UI to metro. wp7 is not the most popular device atm anyways. i mean don't get me wrong it looks ok for a tablet but i think for a desktop the standard aero look works just fine.

this is good stuff, people's minds are just bloated with the old Windows XP UI, which is something from 2001, now, 10 years later its okay.. if not mandatory to have things like that, whoever says this is bad.. he is deeply retarded.. even worse than my left buttcheek and i dont feel for him

Dvid said,
noob question... what exactly ARM is? Thanks

It's a processor architecture developed by ARM holdings and originally concieved by Acorn Computers Ltd, the company behind the BBC Micro, in the 1980s.

ARM stands for Advanced RISC Machine and the simplicity of the processors mean the tend to be used in low power systems such as mobile phones.

seems like it was thought of as a tablet/mobile OS first and then kind of thrown into the Desktop category by using it as something of a theme or skin on top of the Windows 7 ui. also....enough with the apps

Amazing the amount of ignorant comments. You can switch back and forth between the Metro UI and Windows 7 UI. What's so damn hard about that? I love having a FULL-blown OS with file system instead of the crippled thing that's iOS.

lordcanti86 said,

Sure...if the iPad could run MacOS apps

The iPad intentionally can't run Mac OS apps so that the users will always know that an "iPad app" will always offer a good touch-oriented interface, and lessen risks of old bad apps sticking along, forcing developers to adopt the new interface.

However, there are merits to the backwards compatibility route too which Microsoft has always been fond of since the Windows project begun.

Photo Feedr? WtF?

I hope you can customize the tiles like you can currently do for icons. Also hope this is just an enhancement like Windows Media Center and it is easy to access the legacy Windows OS. Otherwise, it looks very interesting. Move over WebOS...

Semental said,
Photo Feedr? WtF?

I hope you can customize the tiles like you can currently do for icons. Also hope this is just an enhancement like Windows Media Center and it is easy to access the legacy Windows OS. Otherwise, it looks very interesting. Move over WebOS...

You can, they do so in the video. You can go back and forth between the two UIs at any time.

I like that they're going into a totally new direction, starting their OS from scratch and giving it another visibility.

But I would never use that on my desktop system. This is never going to take off. It will make a great iPad competitor though, that's for sure.

PyX said,
I like that they're going into a totally new direction, starting their OS from scratch and giving it another visibility.

But I would never use that on my desktop system. This is never going to take off. It will make a great iPad competitor though, that's for sure.


why not use it as a desktop system? It's full blown Windows.

PyX said,
I like that they're going into a totally new direction, starting their OS from scratch and giving it another visibility.

But I would never use that on my desktop system. This is never going to take off. It will make a great iPad competitor though, that's for sure.

So don't swipe left? Heh, you can use the desktop UI only, it's up to you I'm sure.

Great for home users but very bad for business/enterprise users. IMO, it does not have a professional look at all. I would like to see the metro UI as an option/add-on not as a requirement.

kkick said,
Great for home users but very bad for business/enterprise users. IMO, it does not have a professional look at all. I would like to see the metro UI as an option/add-on not as a requirement.

I seriously doubt this couldn't be disabled with either a setting somewhere, or a quick group policy change. Although to be honest I couldn't see why this would be bad for a mobile business use, if anything easier to use and whatnot for the less savvy types who call the help desk 30 times a day.

Jen Smith said,

I seriously doubt this couldn't be disabled with either a setting somewhere, or a quick group policy change. Although to be honest I couldn't see why this would be bad for a mobile business use, if anything easier to use and whatnot for the less savvy types who call the help desk 30 times a day.

I see it as more of a distraction for business users and an IT nightmare for trying to teach users on a new interface. I am speaking from experience in completing 3 full Windows 7 roll outs for major corporations. Users were confused and calling HD wondering how to find their programs with the new start orb or better yet finding anything with the ribbon in MS Office 2007/2010. The average corporate (non-tech) user has a very hard time with change. I can only hope the UI can be disabled (or heavily modified) in Windows 8 otherwise I see a very large negative impact on the enterprise sales for Microsoft.

kkick said,
I see it as more of a distraction for business users and an IT nightmare for trying to teach users on a new interface.

Well it is significantly different, I'll give you that (In a good way, I'm really looking forward to getting my hands on a Win8 tablet now.) I know exactly what you mean though, I sure don't miss doing the help-desk stuff. (Supported a few branches of AmEx switching from OS/2 to Windows 95 back in the day... talk about migraine inducing support calls.) But yea, if anything Windows has been very good about disabling things with the group policy editor. 99% of the time new things are able to be nuked either by a quick GP edit or a registry hack, and something this different I seriously doubt is going to be forced down everyone's throat.

kkick said,
Great for home users but very bad for business/enterprise users. IMO, it does not have a professional look at all. I would like to see the metro UI as an option/add-on not as a requirement.

It's not a replacement, that's why in the video they showed that you can go to the current desktop UI if you want/need and go back. This new UI is a extention of the desktop, think of it like this, if you had a wider screen or a 2nd monitor to the left you'd see both UI's running, this is basically a 2nd virtual desktop to the left that you can swap to if you want. But they made it clear, this IS the desktop, it's NOT a simple touch layer on top.

I really love this and its just what I wanted for windows 8 but what I just planed on me doing is getting a windows 8 tablet/laptop... Im really excited

WOW!!! that's really nice and a complete redesign from window 7. Although what's gonna happen to video card like Nvidia or ATI. I want to be able to still play Crysis 2 on my window 8?

its a tablet ui... and windows on arm... which means i dont understand why you would want to play crysis 2 in a tablet. and crysis 2 is not even directx10... so probably is going to be able to play it IF microsoft get somehow to be able to run games and apps we already have.

Wow MS is really doing something extremely innovative with Windows. Although I did notice Windows 7 style UI making an appearance to show the other standard apps... so hmm... I'm actually excited about this upgrade. I hope I get to play with the beta...

this makes me want a ALL in one PC... hopefully the manufacturers will buidl 10-23 inch touch displays that you can lift out of the stand and hold in your hands!

it looks good for a tablet, i just hope on a PC this can be turned off and we can get the standard windows 7 type aero UI. doesn't much matter as ive switched full time to OSX, i use windows for android development only now.

Tech Star said,
iOS and Android just got destroyed in that demo. Loving Windows 8!
Monochrome rectangles! F*ck yeah! Everyone loves monochrome rectangles!!!

As a primarily Apple user, I'm happy to see Microsoft come up with this. I think the UI and concepts will be awesome on tablets. Hopefully this pushes Apple and Google in the right direction. iOS is ready for a complete UI redesign. It was ahead of its time but now it just looks antiquated. Google hasn't done anything different from what Apple did IMO. Microsoft is taking a completely different approach. That is innovation. Consumers win when companies compete. I'm looking for to seeing this on tablets and what Apple's response will be.

This is awesome! If windows markets and continues to develop this right. This will take over all other tablets in the market.

Why? Because it has the support of current windows programs. Companies and users will feel safe switching to this knowing that all their current desktop programs and documents will be supported.

Shiranui said,
I'd like to know what kind of hardware that demo is running on.
The biggest attraction is how smooth everything is.

Apparently it was running on an Atom CPU... and probably an SSD

metro ui is a fantastic for tablets idea but why just make it a layer over the same windows os underneath that we have seen time and time again. a tablet os should be something completely different than the desktop version. this is one of the main reasons ios has worked so well for apple. Microsoft needs to realize that from top to bottom you need a cohesive ui. not a layer over what we already have.

Windows7even said,
metro ui is a fantastic for tablets idea but why just make it a layer over the same windows os underneath that we have seen time and time again.

Thats the point, you get all the fancy tablet bells and whistles, yet your existing software will still work. No fooling around with multiple programs, which (in my opinion) makes this much more useful than the other tablet OS's. Why have a desktop version plus a tablet version of a program (or worse, two different programs and pray they work together), versus just having the exact same program on both?

Edited by Jen Smith, Jun 2 2011, 12:08am :

Windows7even said,
metro ui is a fantastic for tablets idea but why just make it a layer over the same windows os underneath that we have seen time and time again. a tablet os should be something completely different than the desktop version. this is one of the main reasons ios has worked so well for apple. Microsoft needs to realize that from top to bottom you need a cohesive ui. not a layer over what we already have.

Because it's NOT a layer on top, it IS Windows, it IS the desktop. Just think of the tablet UI as an extended desktop to the left of the classic (old) desktop. They're both connected and you can access everything from the new UI just like the old UI. MS made a point that this isn't just a layer on top.

hate that slide the edge to open toolbar, just like in firefox mobile or in dolphin hd.
it's totally awkward

hope they will have an option to permanently show taskbar, like in android 3.

slide left side to scroll apps is totally stupid. a big step back in user experience.

in everything else looks promising. i wonder if it's x86 office running on arm device

coth said,
hate that slide the edge to open toolbar, just like in firefox mobile or in dolphin hd.
it's totally awkward

hope they will have an option to permanently show taskbar, like in android 3.

slide left side to scroll apps is totally stupid. a big step back in user experience.

in everything else looks promising. i wonder if it's x86 office running on arm device

I dont mind it, i usually dont need to be staring at that taskbar every second because what i want to focus on is what im doing, not what the computers processing...even though if its there alllll the time i can just quickly touch it when i need to.

you know you can slide right too right!! honestly i dont know how else a company is going to change how to scroll through things...cuz your never gonna get all your content onto one screen...ore the average person at least.... the least they could change is make it scroll up or down but i like left/right allot more.

I cant wait to see what else they have to show off when its released.

coth said,
hate that slide the edge ... stupid. a big step back in user experience.

It's Windows, pretty good bet everything can be toggled and/or disabled.
coth said,
i wonder if it's x86 office running on arm device

ARM isn't x86 compatible, the applications will need to be compiled for the ARM processor. (Unless they're dotNET assemblies of course.)

Jen Smith said,

ARM isn't x86 compatible, the applications will need to be compiled for the ARM processor. (Unless they're dotNET assemblies of course.)

Or possibly a built in implementation of XP mode that runs seamlessly on tablet hardware? That would be interesting.

Curious as to what is going to happen to the more traditional apps that comes with Windows...e.g. Windows Media Player, Calculator, etc.

hairbautt said,
Curious as to what is going to happen to the more traditional apps that comes with Windows...e.g. Windows Media Player, Calculator, etc.

You'll probably see a Zune Player similar to wp7 (which is an amazing player). Calculator ect will still be there both in desktop form (like now), and calculators that are part of the new Metro UI.

hairbautt said,
Curious as to what is going to happen to the more traditional apps that comes with Windows...e.g. Windows Media Player, Calculator, etc.

I expect MS will make these tablet centric versions of the core Windows apps as well as having the older ones like now, so you can use both. As for WMP, we haven't heard anything about a new version but if you look at the Zune software it does match up well with this new UI actually. Just needs a few minor tweaks.

sexypeperodri said,
Ugh, that is ugly.

Better usability than an Android tablet though. All the Android tablets i've tried apart from one, the Motorola Xoom, have been an absolute disaster as they are way to slow even for moderate usage.

I'm guessing you've never tried a WP7 device otherwise you would know that the simplified interface puts the information first instead of losing it in the UI like Android does.

Very risky for Microsoft. Hopefully that Metro UI doesn't overshadow the Windows Interface on anything that isn't a tablet.

Other than that this looks really good. Nice to see Microsoft pushing a commong UI (Metro) for the first time and to see them finally getting into the new world.

Frazell Thomas said,
Very risky for Microsoft. Hopefully that Metro UI doesn't overshadow the Windows Interface on anything that isn't a tablet.

Other than that this looks really good. Nice to see Microsoft pushing a commong UI (Metro) for the first time and to see them finally getting into the new world.

I'll take a guess here and say if the system doesn't have touch support on the screen, aka it's not a tablet device etc then this tablet UI won't come on at all. So desktop and normal laptops/netbooks that run Win8 won't even interact with it.

GP007 said,

I'll take a guess here and say if the system doesn't have touch support on the screen, aka it's not a tablet device etc then this tablet UI won't come on at all. So desktop and normal laptops/netbooks that run Win8 won't even interact with it.

Microsoft said this will work on any Windows device, laptops & desktops included. I'd probably use it most of the time too for non-serious computing.

~Johnny said,

Microsoft said this will work on any Windows device, laptops & desktops included. I'd probably use it most of the time too for non-serious computing.

You're right, they just said that in the Q&A after I posted, so that's cool, and you can use this just as well with a mouse.

GP007 said,
Dude, the snap feature is great!

indeed!
finally, a way to do 2 things at the same time on a tablet designed OS! (watch a video while talking on messenger for example)

iOS and android tablets were a step backwards in term of productivity because of the lack of a propper window manager.

link8506 said,

indeed!
finally, a way to do 2 things at the same time on a tablet designed OS! (watch a video while talking on messenger for example)

iOS and android tablets were a step backwards in term of productivity because of the lack of a propper window manager.

There's even more stuff in the works for sure though, as the video says this is just a bit of it. That makes it even more exciting.

GP007 said,

There's even more stuff in the works for sure though, as the video says this is just a bit of it. That makes it even more exciting.

My favourite part of the video is wondering what's on all those blurred sheets. There all the way on the right around 0:39.

geoken said,

My favourite part of the video is wondering what's on all those blurred sheets. There all the way on the right around 0:39.

probably a new interface for what is currently shown as a classic windows 7 desktop

geoken said,

My favourite part of the video is wondering what's on all those blurred sheets. There all the way on the right around 0:39.

Ya, I'm with Link8506, since they let you use both of the UI's together and also the shots right next to those that aren't blured seem to be the new install screens then those are probably the classic, or in this case "desktop" UI that they'll tweak to better match the tablet UI.

Jan said,
Amazing demo, needs a lot of polish but what they have so far is amazing.

I didn't noticed any bug or lag. It is a pretty good early version.

And he also confirms that Windows 8 will come to consumers next Year.

At 4:19 mark he says:

"This is just been a small taste of what we are going to showing over next the Year."

FMH said,
Why is some region censored at 40 second mark, on the right? Is it Window 9?

It's probably the new interface of the classic windows experience (the one which actually has "windows" and that is compatible with current applications).
I guess they won't keep the exact same "windows 7 looking desktop UI" side by side with the new "modern UI" like they've shown on this video. They will probably make some cosmetic changes to that classic windows 7 interface too, so that it will appear like an extension of the "modern UI", not just look like a legacy compatibility layer!

warwagon said,
Snazzy

Up until 3:08 when the curtain falls away and we see the little man behind the wizard. This is yet another half assed touch layer built on top of windows instead of into windows.

ad nauseum said,
This is yet another half assed touch layer built on top of windows instead of into windows.

Which is actually a good thing since this will let us run existing Windows apps vesus yet another tablet OS that requires specific software. If I wanted a platform that's non-compatible with my desktop, I'd go with an iPad or Android.

Max Norris said,

Which is actually a good thing since this will let us run existing Windows apps vesus yet another tablet OS that requires specific software. If I wanted a platform that's non-compatible with my desktop, I'd go with an iPad or Android.

Windows to an application is just an API, when I can CreateWindow they can do whatever they want, they don't have to create a window that looks and behaves to the user exactly like a window in the existing UI, as long as it behaves reasonably close programatically. This would allow all applications to take advantage of a new UI paradigm instead of having this current situation where you're jumping between two completely seperate desktops to run new/old programs.

ad nauseum said,
Windows to an application is just an API, when I can ..

Yes, and when you (or your runtime library of choice) call that CreateWindow API function, you also need to add things to it. It doesn't automatically "fill in the blanks" for you. There's no way Windows 8 could magically make a program fit seamlessly into a new UI, at least not reliably. Which again is a good thing, I'd rather have an older pre-Win8 program running as expected versus broken or not at all. Newer software that's "Metro aware" can take advantage of it just fine of course, but the older APIs are still there for existing software. This is a full blown Windows OS after all, not some watered down tablet-specific thing.

Max Norris said,

Yes, and when you (or your runtime library of choice) call that CreateWindow API function, you also need to add things to it. It doesn't automatically "fill in the blanks" for you. There's no way Windows 8 could magically make a program fit seamlessly into a new UI, at least not reliably. Which again is a good thing, I'd rather have an older pre-Win8 program running as expected versus broken or not at all. Newer software that's "Metro aware" can take advantage of it just fine of course, but the older APIs are still there for existing software. This is a full blown Windows OS after all, not some watered down tablet-specific thing.

Windows already does fill in the blanks, change your DPI and look at all your windows with items placed with pixel values, windows doesn't blindly follow where you tell it to put things and for the metro UI it would be no different. It's also not that much a matter of scaling as much as it is letting old apps run in the new launcher. Just replace the standard Windows 7 chrome with some minimal metro equivalents and run every window full screen and use the new window switcher from the sidebar instead of the taskbar.

ad nauseum said,
Windows already does fill in the blanks, change your DPI and look at all your windows with items placed with pixel values

Automatic scaling is exactly that, just changes positioning and font sizes depending on the current DPI setting. It won't automagically make your existing WinForm code suddenly work with a new API. It's like taking some old old Win95 based code and running it on Win7... sure you'll see an icon on the superbar, but depending on which compiler built it, you won't get previews on hover or on flip, etc etc.. just isn't there.
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms229605.aspx

Max Norris said,

Automatic scaling is exactly that, just changes positioning and font sizes depending on the current DPI setting. It won't automagically make your existing WinForm code suddenly work with a new API. It's like taking some old old Win95 based code and running it on Win7... sure you'll see an icon on the superbar, but depending on which compiler built it, you won't get previews on hover or on flip, etc etc.. just isn't there.
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms229605.aspx

Flip and previews have nothing to do with compiler only with whether the ACL has them marked as problematic with composting, there's also no new API, that's the whole point. You obviously haven't a clue as to what you're talking about.

ad nauseum said,
There's also no new API, that's the whole point. You obviously haven't a clue as to what you're talking about.

Riiiiiiight, and existing programs are just going to magically take advantage of new features out of thin air yes? New stuff in Windows = new API's. New taskbar? New API. New compositing effects? New API. New sound system? New API. New f'ing UI? That's a new f'ing API too. Herp derp much? Because it's obvious that you are the non-programmer who doesn't have a clue as to how it works under the hood. Or do I need to link the bloody things in MSDN to you? You know, from the people that wrote the thing in the first place. Hence that little man behind the wizard making sure the older programs still run, you know instead of making everybody start from scratch.

Edited by Max Norris, Jun 2 2011, 3:59am :

Max Norris said,

Riiiiiiight, and existing programs are just going to magically take advantage of new features out of thin air yes? New stuff in Windows = new API's. New taskbar? New API. New compositing effects? New API. New sound system? New API. New f'ing UI? That's a new f'ing API too. Herp derp much? Or do I need to link the bloody things in MSDN to you? You know, from the people that wrote the thing in the first place.

The entire point of an API is that it stays the same even though the underlying implementation changes, your denial of that is proof of just how ignorant you are. Microsoft can and has changed the implementation of the win32 and userland APIs with successive versions of windows to allow existing applications to take advantage of new features and there is nothing stopping them from doing that here. I guess the herp derp is on you, you ****ing retard.

ad nauseum said,
The entire point of an API is that ... I guess the herp derp is on you, you ****ing retard.

Read what you just wrote. Then read it again. Now go on MSDN and look at what API's were changed versus what was replaced or built upon. In your "expert" opinion, how is a program built on winforms going to sudddenly take advantage of this radically different API to take advantage of a very different subsystem? Is it going to magically transform a random app's forms and controls and redesign them in the new style and the new controls? Do you even think before you spout this nonsense? Talk about a f'ing retard.

Max Norris said,

Read what you just wrote. Then read it again. Now go on MSDN and look at what API's were changed versus what was replaced or built upon. In your "expert" opinion, how is a program built on winforms going to sudddenly take advantage of this radically different API to take advantage of a very different subsystem? Is it going to magically transform a random app's forms and controls and redesign them in the new style and the new controls? Do you even think before you spout this nonsense? Talk about a f'ing retard.

THE API IS NOT DIFFERENT
If what you believe were true no application compiled before Vista would composite and no application compiled before XP would run with theming enabled.
THAT IS NOT THE CASE BECAUSE THE API DID NOT CHANGE.
I don't know how much simpler I can make this, old applications could easily work with the new launcher because Microsoft would just be providing an alternative IMPLEMENTATION of existing APIs.
Go back to school because you haven't learned **** about programming if this isn't registering with you.

ad nauseum said,
Microsoft can and has changed the implementation of the win32 and userland APIs with successive versions of windows

ad nauseum said,
THAT IS NOT THE CASE BECAUSE THE API DID NOT CHANGE.

So they did or they didn't? Make up your mind.

ad nauseum said,
old applications could easily work with the new launcher because Microsoft would just be providing an alternative IMPLEMENTATION of existing APIs.

And how is this new IMPLEMENTATION going to tell the new menu system how to draw that purty little box, what information to put on it, what images to use, etc etc? It's not a start menu replacement with the icon blown up four times as large...

ad nauseum said,
Go back to school because you haven't learned **** about programming if this isn't registering with you.

Aw, how cute.

ad nauseum said,

THE API IS NOT DIFFERENT
If what you believe were true no application compiled before Vista would composite and no application compiled before XP would run with theming enabled.
THAT IS NOT THE CASE BECAUSE THE API DID NOT CHANGE.
I don't know how much simpler I can make this, old applications could easily work with the new launcher because Microsoft would just be providing an alternative IMPLEMENTATION of existing APIs.
Go back to school because you haven't learned **** about programming if this isn't registering with you.

If I'm understanding your discussion correctly, what you're saying is that a non-touch UI can be adapted to a touch-based UI with an update to the way that Windows renders the software.

Of course apps could work with the new launcher, but they simply wouldn't look right or interact appropriately.

While the API needn't change, and Microsoft could rework the way that controls on the screen are rendered so as to fit a bit better with the UI, the fact of the matter is that as developers, we have a lot of control over the appearance, design and implementation of our appliciations on our own.

Many applications simply aren't designed to fit within the scope of this new interface -- whether it because there's a custom toolbar implementation, images being used to render the interface or buttons that don't accommodate the space needed for touch use -- many things could go wrong with flat out changing the way the UI is rendered at its core.

With XP, for example, one could add a manifest file (as I'm sure you both know) to an application which would instruct the operating system to render the buttons using the new format. Unforunately, Windows XP's user interface was not a complete paradigm shift.

This UI is.

This new UI is changing the very way that we interact with Windows software. Developers will have to rewrite certain parts of their software to have it fit with the tile and touch-based nature of this UI.

Edited by tajddin, Jun 2 2011, 4:39am :

Max Norris said,

So they did or they didn't? Make up your mind.

You honestly don't know the difference between an API and an implementation of an API? Run along with all the rest of the .NETards, the grown ups are talking.

ad nauseum said,

Up until 3:08 when the curtain falls away and we see the little man behind the wizard. This is yet another half assed touch layer built on top of windows instead of into windows.

Except that you're pretty wrong. Right from D9:

Q: How is Windows 8 different from TouchSmart? Isn't this just a layer on top of Windows?

Larsen-Green is adamant. It's not a layer. It's Windows. It's a seamless experience, she adds noting that you can still access the file system and other core systems.

It's not a compatibility layer, it's not a simple touch skin on top of the desktop, it IS the desktop, there's two parts of the same thing which is why you can flip between the two so smoothly back and forth. The tablet UI gives you full system file access and so on. It's build INTO windows.

ad nauseum said,

You honestly don't know the difference between an API and an implementation of an API? Run along with all the rest of the .NETards, the grown ups are talking.

Did you miss the part where they said these apps run on a brand new API they had developed?

ad nauseum said,
Run along with all the rest of the .NETards, the grown ups are talking.

Lol yes.. arbitrarily calling people who use .NET retarded, that's very grown up of you, never mind an odd thing to pull out of thin air. Care to give your "reasoning" behind that one too genius? Aside wondering why you even assume I work with .NET as a programmer, are you now going to argue that the .NET platform can't interact with the Windows API too?