Windows 8: The Windows Store

When Microsoft announced Windows 8 Developer Preview on Tuesday, viewers and attendees to the event in Anaheim, California got a preview of the new Windows Store.

Microsoft unveiled that they will finally be launching a Windows Store with applications and games developed in HTML5/CSS with JavaScript, C, C#, C++, VB or XAML. The Windows Store will only be accessible through the new Metro interface and feature free and paid applications.

Today Microsoft went into further details about the Windows Store and how it will operate.

Firstly, Microsoft discussed that all applications will go through a six step approval process, but during this process, they will run virus and malware scans on every submitted applications, preventing rogue applications from appearing on the Windows Store. This rigorous testing phase will help eliminate potential threats on the store.

Windows 8 will also include built in security to prevent malicious attacks on users’ system.

All applications will also undergo a moderated content review process where applications that do not meet Microsoft’s “content appropriateness” will be rejected. The company didn’t go into detail about what type of content they would consider to be restricted from the app store.

Each application and game will have a rating and comment section for users to share their opinions, but Microsoft quickly noted that these comments will be moderated, but didn’t go into details if content would be edited or removed. Microsoft will likely be removing spam from comments to keep a clean community.

The Windows Store featured applications, one for each tile group, consists of up to 9 small tiles of the featured app for each category. The Windows Store tile groups are split into each available category with the top rated, top free and top paid tiles for each section. The featured application, or game, on each category will be chosen by an editor from Microsoft.

All developers will be able to view, modify or even prevent further sale of their applications through the Windows Store control panel. Each application will have a detailed analysis of crash reports, download history, total sales. The dashboard for applications will give developers a useful tool to help track their progress, conversation rate from the "try it" to "buy it" feature in the store, to a complete break down of how users take to your application.

The Windows Store is not available in the developer preview build 8102.

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Windows 8: Troubleshooting startup and system refresh

Next Story

YouTube adds new video editing tools

14 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

People are complaining because the Metro interface abandons much of what made Windows 95 and on so great. Multitasking. Running two apps next to each other (not even in their full mode at that) is not good enough for many people. There isn't even a method to visually see which apps need your attention or to quickly switch between two apps without swiping through many open apps. Something similar to the windows 7 superbar without the tray would make it much better in my opinion. The win7 superbar already has large buttons that would be touch friendly. A touch and hold option to open quickjump lists would be fine too. Many of the things that people associate with touch UIs are the direct cause of early touch devices not being capable of multitasking and so the developers didn't design them with multitasking in mind. MS has an opportunity to make a much better touch UI with multitasking as a core feature.

I think the most interesting thing they said about it was that if you can also be on the AppStore even if you don't want to be tied down to their revenue models, and on your App page it will say something like "visit http://www.x.com to buy the App".

Can you backup the installers of the apps you purchased through the store? In other words, can you "own" the apps should be reinstall is necessary?

With all of these great implementations (better than Android or iOS), I just can't understand how people are still going out and saying that Windows 8 is a horrible OS.

PlogCF said,
With all of these great implementations (better than Android or iOS), I just can't understand how people are still going out and saying that Windows 8 is a horrible OS.

Part of that's probably because people thinks the Dev Preview = exactly how Windows 8 is going to turn out.

PlogCF said,
With all of these great implementations (better than Android or iOS), I just can't understand how people are still going out and saying that Windows 8 is a horrible OS.

People aren't use to the new UI, they think it's just for touch but the fact is you can fully use it with a KB alone, as long as you know the kb shortcuts. Either way, I used it fine with a kb+mouse in virtualbox. There are parts missing in this build though but it'll only get better once we hit beta, and I think people will start to calm down about it.

Apple taken a lot of heat for their approval format. I wonder if Microsoft will be more liberal when it comes to approving certain apps.

Nidoking said,
Apple taken a lot of heat for their approval format. I wonder if Microsoft will be more liberal when it comes to approving certain apps.

tip top fart apps available for the masses!!!!

Will the store be available in the dev preview via a windows update update at some point? Steven Sinofsky did say that they would be updating it right..?

zikalify said,
Will the store be available in the dev preview via a windows update update at some point? Steven Sinofsky did say that they would be updating it right..?

I hope so!

It is nice to see the Try It feature is being carried over from Windows Phone 7. Instead of flooding the app market with free and pay versions, it makes it much more convenient to try something out and also does not inflate the app store numbers.