Windows 8.1 'August Update' returns, now with less BSOD

If you were not able to download the release of the 'August Update' last month before Microsoft pulled the files, you can do so once again. Microsoft was forced to remove the update from its website as well as Windows Update after there were many reports of the updates causing various issues from BSOD to fonts not rendering correctly.

But, all is good now as Microsoft has said that the updates have been scrubbed and are now bug free. So, if you were not able to download the update before, or you did so and it crashed your machine and you were forced to remove it, you can now download the update again from the source link below.

Microsoft has said that the following updates will be included for Windows 8.1 users:

  • Precision touchpad improvements – three new end-user settings have been added: Leave touch pad on when a mouse is connected; allow right-clicks on the touchpad; double-tap and drag.
  • Miracast Receive – exposes a set of Wi-Fi direct APIs for Independent Hardware Vendor (IHV) drivers or OEM drivers to develop Windows 32-bit applications that run on all supported x86-based or x64-based versions of Windows 8.1, enabling the computer as a Miracast receiver.
  • Minimizing login prompts for SharePoint Online – reduces the number of prompts with federated use in accessing SharePoint Online sites. If you select the “Keep me signed in” check box when you log on for the first time, you will not see prompts for successive access to that SharePoint Online site.

This update was the first of Microsoft's monthly feature updates for Windows, that wasn't just a patch and it is fair to say that it was not a smooth transition to the fastest update cycle yet for the platform. The company said previously that it expects to roll-out monthly updates, much like it does with Xbox, and August was the first iteration of this new release cadence.

Download: Windows 8.1 'August Update' x86 | x64

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Guess I'm an infidel, but 30 seconds of tweaking and 8.1 surpasses 7 in every way for me, but *shrug* get what you put into it I guess.

Max Norris said,
Guess I'm an infidel, but 30 seconds of tweaking and 8.1 surpasses 7 in every way for me, but *shrug* get what you put into it I guess.

Serious question, what 30 seconds of tweaking would that be?

KZWings said,
Serious question, what 30 seconds of tweaking would that be?

For me, Classic Shell and "OldNewExplorer." Functionally identical to 7, but faster/smoother and a few improvements as well. Click click done. (I also do other stuff like look and feel but no difference from 7 there, I change the style, icons etc in 7 too.)

Deyirn said,
i have win 8.1 its balls windows 7 is the new xp, heed my words, infidels

It's balls? Get past 7th grade and then maybe your opinion will have merit.

No. They did not fix the persistent taskbar issue. I hope they do. I was very happy with 8.1 until the taskbar "never going away when apps are running" issue occurred. Mail is miserable with the taskbar blocking buttons.

seeprime said,
No. They did not fix the persistent taskbar issue. I hope they do. I was very happy with 8.1 until the taskbar "never going away when apps are running" issue occurred. Mail is miserable with the taskbar blocking buttons.

D*mmit.

Turn the animations back on guys.. its not a big deal. That said.. they should still fix it as there are a ton of people who run Windows with animations off apparently.

I'm so tired of half-assed updates...

Not from Microsoft alone, but many other software vendors switching to a faster release cycle. You want to do things fast? That's fine by me, but keep QA phases in place! Test your stuff before releasing it to people.

Seriously, I don't know what they teach these people nowadays, some of them produce software that comes with bugs that common sense can see (i.e. a simple "what if...?" could realize about it). It's all about deadlines instead of proper structure testing policies and quality assurance.

KaoDome said,
I'm so tired of half-assed updates...

Not from Microsoft alone, but many other software vendors switching to a faster release cycle. You want to do things fast? That's fine by me, but keep QA phases in place! Test your stuff before releasing it to people.

Seriously, I don't know what they teach these people nowadays, some of them produce software that comes with bugs that common sense can see (i.e. a simple "what if...?" could realize about it). It's all about deadlines instead of proper structure testing policies and quality assurance.

Well my friend, welcome to the ###### quality IT world of the 2010s!

Microsoft started this downhill around 2006. Thats the year when Vista was released.

The other perfect example is Exchange Server. Exchange Server 2003, 11 years ago was a very solid product (actually the industry agrees on that, its not just me saying this). Then in 2006 / 2007 came Exchange server 2007, and the product started to have more problems than before. Then in 2009 / 2010 came Exchange server 2010, and it became very buggy. In those days, approx. every second (yes, thats 1 out of 2, or 50% otherwise said) update pack cause some big (really big) fakkaps, I remember there was even V3 or V4 re-re-release of the same patch, that fixed original problems, and new problems introduced in the 1st and 2nd releases of the same patch. And finally came Exchange Server 2013. Dont trust me, check with your own eyes: spend a weekend and google the update failures that happened between Oct 2012 and today, how many times a new update broke something, and had to be pulled back, re-publish a couple of weeks later, just to realize it caused another new set of issues etc. etc. etc.

To be fair, I am not only blaming MS. Cisco IOS v 12.3 / 12.4 and the 15.x train sucked (and still suck) similarly. In general the quality of software just went downhill in the entire industry. Looking at smartphones apps: now thats even a bigger tragedy, I cannot even talk about that.

"exposes a set of Wi-Fi direct APIs for Independent Hardware Vendor (IHV) drivers or OEM drivers to develop Windows 32-bit applications that run on all supported x86-based or x64-based versions of Windows 8.1, enabling the computer as a Miracast receiver"

but off course what the world isn't doing is making win32 apps but instead native mobile apps which in windows, means winRT...and as typical MS there is a fight: those that want to unleash winRT from the tyrannical hands of the "we hate developers" crowd at MS, and those from the old school MS where "developers, developers, developers = evil evil evil we can't trust them" win.

Installing the updated updates, I already have the first versions installed, won't see much difference, never had issues either...

If MS updated the KB article at all beyond the date, I'm missing it. Still the same known issues listed as before, right?

Well, aside from the smaller updates the download page offers, the major one, KB2975719, is exactly the same file size as the original I downloaded last Patch Tuesday- 173,350 KB. Apparently the smaller ones are the ones that make the difference.

After installing this update, wifi stop working and i have to uninstall it to make it working again, what's point of pushing updates if it still mess with system and driver !

Windows 8.1X64 Ent.

Also worth a note that this affected other versions of Windows as well.
So check again for updated updates to fix the issue (if you had it)

All my PC Hardware is made in 2009. I installed this update and all went well. Maybe this is because I Slipstream (Inject) updates in to a Windows image and use that image to install windows. :-)

jesseinsf said,
I notice I get a repeat post when I tempt to edit one.

Yep,
Same thing happened to me yesterday and it was quite difficult to fix it.

Hmm, first thing I do when installing windows is disabling windows update. This greatly increases the life of OS reinstall cycle other than saving you time, bugs and performance problems.

I'm so confused with MS Updates

This is a roll-up right? which kinda sounds like it 'rolls up' lots of updates into one package. Mmmmmm, how come when I installed a fresh PC today with Windows 8 I had tons of updates pending? the same amount as I had last week when the Aug update was pulled?

surely the pc being built today should have less updates to install since this 'roll up' contains them? or at least more than the machine from last week

it kinda sounds like I have to install updates, then install the roll up updates which already contains them?

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