Windows 8.1 Update 1 reportedly set for March 11 release

Earlier this month, the man responsible for leaking screenshots of Windows 8.1's first update claimed Microsoft would release the upgrade sometime in March, though he didn't provide a specific date. According to a new report, that date is March 11.

ZDNet's Mary Jo Foley, who has a strong track record for her accuracy of Microsoft-related rumors, says one of her most "accurate and trusted sources" told her Windows 8.1 Update 1 will be released March 11; she further states that Windows Phone 8.1 will be released at about the same time as well. Foley says there's no indication if Microsoft will release future upgrades similar to Update 1 prior to the next version of Windows, which has the codename "Threshold."

Recently leaked screenshots have displayed new functionality for Windows 8.1 with the update, including the ability to pin Metro-style apps to the taskbar. On Wednesday, Paul Thurrott reported the update will also include a close button for Metro apps, similar to desktop windows, making it easier for mouse and keyboard users.

One thing neither Foley nor anyone outside Microsoft has figured out is if the Start menu will make its return in Update 1. It's believed the Start menu will make its return with Threshold at the latest, and Foley says she'd be "surprised" if it arrived with Update 1.

As pointed out by Foley, March 11 would be "Patch Tuesday," the second Tuesday of the month, which is when Microsoft regularly releases patches and minor updates. Foley claims Update 1 would be released via Windows Update and not the Windows Store. If Microsoft does publish Update 1 on March 11, it would notably be released a month before Microsoft's BUILD 2014 conference, where it's expected to showcase Threshold.

Source: ZDNet | Image via Win8China

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Co-ords said,
MS keeps scrambling to make people happy it seems... it's not going to work!!!

Well...? Don't leave us all hanging like that...enlighten us, what should they do instead?

I really still don't understand how can people use window 8 or 8.1 the font rendering is sooo bad compare to earlier windows versions.

I feel sorry for the normal people who don't read tech blogs. How will they cope with all the changes. Lets say they pretty well hate their new computer because of Windows 8 but plodded along anyway and now all these UI/UX changes get implemented. It will kill them! Their heads will explode.

*sigh* why don't they turn back windows 8 to windows 7 I really did like windows 8 but now that it looks like the loud minority wins again win 8 might just turn into 7

Mr.mister said,
*sigh* why don't they turn back windows 8 to windows 7 I really did like windows 8 but now that it looks like the loud minority wins again win 8 might just turn into 7

In case you haven't noticed windows 8.x has completely tanked at the retail level, and for good reason.

It's obvious that Microsoft didn't think through the design of Windows 8 for keyboard/mouse users. Metro should have never been the default for non-touch interfaces. It makes absolutely no sense. And I don't know why Microsoft continues to put band-aids on the problem instead of solving it. Each update to Windows 8 is another sign that the Metro interface doesn't belong on a desktop PC but Microsoft is just too damn stubborn to admit its a mistake and correct it. Instead, these updates create even more usability issues - at least as far as convenience goes. It's a cluster-eff.

srprimeaux said,
It's obvious that Microsoft didn't think through the design of Windows 8 for keyboard/mouse users. Metro should have never been the default for non-touch interfaces. It makes absolutely no sense. And I don't know why Microsoft continues to put band-aids on the problem instead of solving it. Each update to Windows 8 is another sign that the Metro interface doesn't belong on a desktop PC but Microsoft is just too damn stubborn to admit its a mistake and correct it. Instead, these updates create even more usability issues - at least as far as convenience goes. It's a cluster-eff.

What's wrong with it? It works fine with my kb/m. It works the same as the desktop.

srprimeaux said,
It's obvious that Microsoft didn't think through the design of Windows 8 for keyboard/mouse users. Metro should have never been the default for non-touch interfaces. It makes absolutely no sense. And I don't know why Microsoft continues to put band-aids on the problem instead of solving it. Each update to Windows 8 is another sign that the Metro interface doesn't belong on a desktop PC but Microsoft is just too damn stubborn to admit its a mistake and correct it. Instead, these updates create even more usability issues - at least as far as convenience goes. It's a cluster-eff.
Install Start8 - it will solve all your problems. http://www.stardock.com/products/start8/

Dot Matrix said,

What's wrong with it? It works fine with my kb/m. It works the same as the desktop.

Who has ever thought of moving a mouse pointer to the top of a screen, clicking, and dragging straight down to close an application? Who thought that was convenient? Natural? It's a clear afterthought.

srprimeaux said,

Who has ever thought of moving a mouse pointer to the top of a screen, clicking, and dragging straight down to close an application? Who thought that was convenient? Natural? It's a clear afterthought.

You have to move your mouse if you're gonna use it. Why are so many people looking to cling to that thing, yet so afraid to move it? There's also ways to close Metro apps on the task switcher. Is that convenient for you?

Dot Matrix said,

You have to move your mouse if you're gonna use it. Why are so many people looking to cling to that thing, yet so afraid to move it? There's also ways to close Metro apps on the task switcher. Is that convenient for you?

Of course you have to move the mouse. Are you serious? Come on. We're not idiots here. But there's a natural way to move a mouse and perform actions with it and then there are ways that aren't natural. Moving my pointer to a red X and clicking it is natural. Having to go up to a non-existing border, click it, hold down the button, and make sure I'm dragging it straight down and not to left or right for that would dock it to either position instead of getting rid of it is not a natural method of using a pointing device. Microsoft is trying to use the mouse to mimic touch and it's not working.

I like the idea of pinning the apps on the taskbar but maybe MS could take a hint from Stardock's ModernMix by allowing said apps to run in a window.

briangw said,
I like the idea of pinning the apps on the taskbar but maybe MS could take a hint from Stardock's ModernMix by allowing said apps to run in a window.

Read up on the next version, that's coming but not in this update. I don't know why it's going to take longer to come but I think they might want to introduce it with the new menu. If you look at screen shots the pin option for the taskbar is off by default.

George P said,

Read up on the next version, that's coming but not in this update. I don't know why it's going to take longer to come but I think they might want to introduce it with the new menu. If you look at screen shots the pin option for the taskbar is off by default.

Yeah, I just now read that in Thurrot's report. Interesting.

Asmodai said,

I'm going to wait until at least 8.1.1.1.1.1.1 before I upgrade!

Smart move. At the current speed of development they will invent the start menu at 8.1.1.1.1.1 ...

I'm not understanding the point of pinning metro apps to the taskbar in their current form. Current rumors are saying Windowed metro apps won't come until Windows 9.

If that's true, then that means when you open Metro apps on the taskbar, they would still open full screen. Meaning, from that point on you still need to hit the Windows Key + D to return to the desktop. You can't just switch between apps by clicking on each respective's taskbar icon.

Don't get me wrong, I think this is a good transition to move metro apps to be used on the desktop, but I feel the full usability won't be realized until Metro apps can be put inside 'windows'

Now just add some kind of notifications to the pinned tiles on the taskbar and I would be quite happy. I really like the new Mail app that came with 8.1, but I would love to see if I've mail while on the desktop, that would be great!

PeTiNgA said,
Now just add some kind of notifications to the pinned tiles on the taskbar and I would be quite happy. I really like the new Mail app that came with 8.1, but I would love to see if I've mail while on the desktop, that would be great!

That should be possible since the taskbar can do that now with win32 apps, I agree that it's needed to, if you're going to pin them then that's needed.

Great, that only 1,5 month from now! Anyway, I think there will be another update like this one, why would they call it Update 1 anyway?

So, this kind of also tells us that Build '14 won't be about Update 1.

Edited by Studio384, Jan 24 2014, 5:26pm :

Studio384 said,
Great, that only 1,5 month from now! Anyway, I think there will be another update like this one, why would they call it Update 1 anyway?

So, this kind of also tells us that Build '14 won't be about Update 1.

I always heard BUILD will be more about WP8.1 and the Xbox One than about Windows. That said if this is just the first 8.1 update we could see a second later in the year that will bring more changes. The talk out there is that Windows 9 isn't going to be a big update like some think, it could've just as well been called 8.2 or 8.5.

I think that this could be true because of the shorter release cycle but also the fact that they're already making changes with the 8.1 update as we're seeing.

Smart move to add a close button. The new UI got a lot of negative feedback because it forced gestures designed for touch on non-touch users. Having the interface be adaptable to the choice of input would certainly improve the situation.

warwagon said,

NO IT DOESN'T!!! It was designed for a mouse!!!!!!!

/s

Does using scream and sarcasm symbols mean you also scream while being sarcastic in real life? Because I find that impressive.

Ronnet said,
Smart move to add a close button. The new UI got a lot of negative feedback because it forced gestures designed for touch on non-touch users. Having the interface be adaptable to the choice of input would certainly improve the situation.

Except closing an App isn't 'only' available as a gesture.

(I can think of several traditional keyboard/mouse methods that are still there to close and App, from Alt-F4 to right clicking on thumbnail - Close, or middle click, etc.)

I think putting a more noticeable close button is a good thing, as it helps new users and also keep users from trying to make an artificial distinction between desktop/modern and can't be bothered to see if their hypothesis holds up.

If anything the Modern/WinRT APIs are more keyboard and 'basic' input conducive than they cater to any specific input modality.

Yeah, that's one of the biggest questions I've gotten over the past year is how to close out programs or get back to the Start screen.

Agreed the close button is a good thing. Perhaps they should include minimize buttons as well for the ability to push the app back and return to desktop as easily as it was brought forward.

Mobius Enigma said,

Except closing an App isn't 'only' available as a gesture.

(I can think of several traditional keyboard/mouse methods that are still there to close and App, from Alt-F4 to right clicking on thumbnail - Close, or middle click, etc.)

I think putting a more noticeable close button is a good thing, as it helps new users and also keep users from trying to make an artificial distinction between desktop/modern and can't be bothered to see if their hypothesis holds up.

If anything the Modern/WinRT APIs are more keyboard and 'basic' input conducive than they cater to any specific input modality.

The average user doesn't know about all those 'shortcuts'. They need visual cues and reminders. An 'X' in the corner will help improve their productivity drastically.

It pains me to see someone without a touch screen use Windows 8 now. When I demonstrate the gestures on a tablet they experience it as a fun gesture and it comes naturally. On a non-touch device it doesnt come naturally and they keep forgetting.

Just imagine, the moment someone moves the mouse the hidden interface elements pop-up. The charms and appbar come into view (smaller then the touch version of them) and an 'X' appears in the right corner. No longer do you need to use gestures that force you to move your mouse to all corners of your large monitor display. The moment you touch the screen the UI elements go back into hiding and you can use the gestures again.

I think the Start screen one is easy: if you're laptop/desktop user - definitely always the Windows key on the keyboard; if you're a tablet user - Windows button on the monitor.

Closing apps is annoying. The most straightforward method I know is to press down on the very top center of the app and pull the thumbnail down to the bottom.

I'm lucky I have a hybrid touch laptop (Acer Aspire R7) where it's very easy to press and swipe down. But depending on the mouse set-up of some computers, it can be tricky and difficult. I've tried some of the other Windows 8 computers at various stores, and I found maybe a 50-50 chance where the trackpad (or sometimes the mouse) couldn't fully hold and pull down the app to close it. Or at least it took several tries to do it.

I definitely think a visual X would work better for desktop/laptop users, but I think both methods are optional for either touch/non-touch users alike.

Ronnet said,

The average user doesn't know about all those 'shortcuts'. They need visual cues and reminders. An 'X' in the corner will help improve their productivity drastically.

It pains me to see someone without a touch screen use Windows 8 now. When I demonstrate the gestures on a tablet they experience it as a fun gesture and it comes naturally. On a non-touch device it doesnt come naturally and they keep forgetting.

Just imagine, the moment someone moves the mouse the hidden interface elements pop-up. The charms and appbar come into view (smaller then the touch version of them) and an 'X' appears in the right corner. No longer do you need to use gestures that force you to move your mouse to all corners of your large monitor display. The moment you touch the screen the UI elements go back into hiding and you can use the gestures again.

I agree with 90% of this.

The part I have a problem with is that users WILL need to get used to hidden UI elements and portions of the UI not existing on screen full time.

Users eventually learned to click a 'Menu' and even right click to get a 'Menu' which are just hidden UI elements.

With the UI model Microsoft wants to move forward with, users will still need to adjust to things not being onscreen all the time. This is important for the evolution of the UI.

Mobile devices have already been conditioning users that things exist 'outside' of view due to the screen size, and now users need to make the same leap on all computers - even if they are servers or desktops.

This is important because it also goes beyond keyboard/mouse/touch - it also is needed for voice, visual, motion and other forms of interaction.

The user needs 'consistency' so it doesn't matter if they swipe with a finger or move a mouse or hit a keystroke or speak a voice command the UI is available and appears to interact with them in essentially the same way. (Even if the UI changes slightly to offer more voice features or more places to touch or a place to type or a place to click.)

This last part is the consistency that doesn't fully exist on Windows 8.1, and also is where people are having trouble seeing as a unified UI model going forward.

And yes, Microsoft is to blame for some of this, as it should be seen as an universal UI model. Instead users only notice or see the 'touch' stuff and then make bad assumptions that it doesn't work with mice/keyboards or was designed only for touch.

I understand the need for consistency but some things dont work for some set-ups while they are perfect for another. For example Windows 8's swipe from the top to close. This is a nice gesture on tablets. Buy imagine if Microsoft would implement it on Windows Phone. No longer would the OS be useable with one hand if you have a large screen phone.

This doesnt mean I think they should ALSO add swipe to close to WP. They should but it shouldnt be the only way to close apps. The closing via the appswitcher should also remain.

In a similar sense Windows on desktop needs the X for closing as the gesture simply isnt intuitive with the mouse. That doesnt mean they should remove it entirely but they should add the button for those using the mouse (that didappears when you use touch).

A lot will remain consistent and identical whether you are using Windows on phone, tablet or desktop. But Microsoft shouldnt be blind to what doesnt work for some devices. You dont want to force an subpar experience onto users. They will react the OS on thst particular device as now seen with Windows 8 on desktop. So if Microsoft wants to realize its one OS vision then there needs to be an 'adaptable UI'.

Ronnet said,
I understand the need for consistency but some things dont work for some set-ups while they are perfect for another. For example Windows 8's swipe from the top to close. This is a nice gesture on tablets. Buy imagine if Microsoft would implement it on Windows Phone. No longer would the OS be useable with one hand if you have a large screen phone.

This doesnt mean I think they should ALSO add swipe to close to WP. They should but it shouldnt be the only way to close apps. The closing via the appswitcher should also remain.

In a similar sense Windows on desktop needs the X for closing as the gesture simply isnt intuitive with the mouse. That doesnt mean they should remove it entirely but they should add the button for those using the mouse (that didappears when you use touch).

A lot will remain consistent and identical whether you are using Windows on phone, tablet or desktop. But Microsoft shouldnt be blind to what doesnt work for some devices. You dont want to force an subpar experience onto users. They will react the OS on thst particular device as now seen with Windows 8 on desktop. So if Microsoft wants to realize its one OS vision then there needs to be an 'adaptable UI'.

I agree that the current 'gesture' may not be the best. There are things WP8 does better with UI consistency and gestures and W8 does.

With many of the W8 UI 'goofs' out of the way and the WP8 UI team working on Win8/9, there are going to be a lot more changes that will offer better interactions and also provide more consistency between WP8 and W8.


The other problem is that with WP8 and W8, there truly isn't meant to be a 'close' mechanism, and this is hard for both developers and users to deal with.

So even the 'close' gesture/button that we both can agree is not the best, really shouldn't exist or be seen as 'close/exit'.

Instead of 'closing' an App, in 8.1. it is truly just removing the App from the recent/active list for the user.

The App state is maintained by the OS based on a lot of factors, and Microsoft has done well with this. This is true on both WP8 and W8.1, even though there are still a few small differences.

It is something that isn't discussed much, and is something that Android and even iOS could learn a lot from.

(This conversation also reminds me that I still need to go back and follow up on some research on what the latest set of plans are for moving away from App states that Microsoft has planned that differs from how 8.1 works.)

PS
Look for several good things coming in the next year to unify Windows User Interactions and Interface elements. Look for more consistency and new mechanisms that work better than what W8.1 or WP8 currently offer.


Beneath the surface (no pun intended) there are some differences between WP and W8. But for the end-consumer closing an app in W8 means the same as on WP. It would be nice if its possible to use consistent gestures. So a swipe down to close can be available on both devices. At the same time there could be an 'X' button next to the app tiles in the appswitcher. On W8 it is already possible to close apps in the app switcher when you right click with mouse. So consumers will have choice in how to use Windows.

I hope you're right about the unification of the platforms. But the changes seen in this build of Windows 8 aren't encouraging. They seem to break the consistency in Windows 8 let alone work towards consistency between W8 and WP.

Ronnet said,
Beneath the surface (no pun intended) there are some differences between WP and W8. But for the end-consumer closing an app in W8 means the same as on WP. It would be nice if its possible to use consistent gestures. So a swipe down to close can be available on both devices. At the same time there could be an 'X' button next to the app tiles in the appswitcher. On W8 it is already possible to close apps in the app switcher when you right click with mouse. So consumers will have choice in how to use Windows.

I hope you're right about the unification of the platforms. But the changes seen in this build of Windows 8 aren't encouraging. They seem to break the consistency in Windows 8 let alone work towards consistency between W8 and WP.

I have hopes that consistency will no longer even be a necessary conversation in the next version or maybe version and a half. Same features available if the users wants to enable them.

Sinosfky and other like him put up a lot of walls between W8 and WP8 that should never have existed. They even put up walls between WOA and Win8 and what native code and Win32 got support in WinRT that was discarded out of an ideal of purity rather than just based on security and meeting the goals of the new framework.

Everything I see is moving away from this stupid crap, and I hope it continues.


(Realistically, WP8 is already running WinSxS and could run the desktop and Office 2013 on the phone, it would be horrible tiny, but there is nothing except artificial restrictions by the Windows team that prevents it.)

New versioning scheme from Microsoft:

Windows 8
Windows 8.1
Windows 8.1 Update 1
Windows 8.1 Update 1 Patch 1
Windows 8.1 Update 1 Patch 1 Revision 1
Windows 8.1 Update 1 Patch 1 Revision 1 GDR 1

Lord Method Man said,
New versioning scheme from Microsoft:

Windows 8
Windows 8.1
Windows 8.1 Update 1
Windows 8.1 Update 1 Patch 1
Windows 8.1 Update 1 Patch 1 Revision 1
Windows 8.1 Update 1 Patch 1 Revision 1 GDR 1


To be fair, this is what journalists are calling it right now based on what we know. Microsoft may or may not call it that.

I don't care what they call it, i like all these free updates. Way better than the days of Win 7 and older where you'd wait forever for a SP and it never had any noticeable changes.

NoClipMode said,
I don't care what they call it, i like all these free updates. Way better than the days of Win 7 and older where you'd wait forever for a SP and it never had any noticeable changes.

To be fair, Windows 7 didn't really need any noticeable changes. You don't fix things that aren't broke at least. Overhauls to UI and such are better made on new releases as opposed to updates.

dead.cell said,

To be fair, Windows 7 didn't really need any noticeable changes. You don't fix things that aren't broke at least. Overhauls to UI and such are better made on new releases as opposed to updates.

Win 7 is overrated, it was lazy and playing it way too safe. It was just a slightly improved Vista. MS also can't wait years anymore to make changes to UI or add features. So much happened in the time Win 7 was around and MS got left behind. I'm happy that MS are doing much faster updates now, like everyone else.

NoClipMode said,
Win 7 is overrated, it was lazy and playing it way too safe. It was just a slightly improved Vista. MS also can't wait years anymore to make changes to UI or add features. So much happened in the time Win 7 was around and MS got left behind. I'm happy that MS are doing much faster updates now, like everyone else.

Except we NEEDED a refined Vista, not a complete overhaul of the interface or anything.

Developers generally have plans for a whole world of things, but what makes it to release depends on the amount of time and resources available. Would you have rather waited with Vista until Windows 8 was completed? I sure as hell couldn't...

This is actually pretty good, if Microsoft can give us a spring update which is also a roll-up of all updates since 8.1

If it's also a rollup - WIN
If it's not a rollup - FAIL

Doubt the start menu will return in update 1 if at all, but if it did return in update 1 and if they also let you turn it off they would have some very happy windows 8 customers, minus 1 customer who would think the anti Christ has arrived.

warwagon said,
Doubt the start menu will return in update 1 if at all, but if it did return in update 1 and if they also let you turn it off they would have some very happy windows 8 customers, minus 1 customer who would think the anti Christ has arrived.

Would be nice if the OS could auto detect what device you are using and adjust to use Metro or a Start Menu.

techbeck said,

Would be nice if the OS could auto detect what device you are using and adjust to use Metro or a Start Menu.

And then still give the option to use whichever the user prefers?

Indeed. It already does that with the tutorial. If it detects touch it gives you the thumb side swipe tutorial. If it doesn't it gives you the jamming the mouse in the corner tutorial!

warwagon said,
This is actually pretty good, if Microsoft can give us a spring update which is also a roll-up of all updates since 8.1

If it's also a rollup - WIN
If it's not a rollup - FAIL

Doubt the start menu will return in update 1 if at all, but if it did return in update 1 and if they also let you turn it off they would have some very happy windows 8 customers, minus 1 customer who would think the anti Christ has arrived.

By then, there have been only 4 Patch Tuesdays since launch. No reason for a roll up.

warwagon said,
This is actually pretty good, if Microsoft can give us a spring update which is also a roll-up of all updates since 8.1

If it's also a rollup - WIN
If it's not a rollup - FAIL

Doubt the start menu will return in update 1 if at all, but if it did return in update 1 and if they also let you turn it off they would have some very happy windows 8 customers, minus 1 customer who would think the anti Christ has arrived.

Still convinced that the Win7 Start Menu is coming back? I have a feeling BUILD is going to be very disappointing for you.

"So what'll be in Threshold? The two things Thurrott says are a way of running Metro apps on the desktop and a reinstatement of the Start menu. Our sources say that's only sort of true, and that it won't be the Start menu as such but rather something new. Start menuesque, perhaps, but not a literal Start menu."

- Peter Bright.

Dot Matrix said,

Still convinced that the Win7 Start Menu is coming back? I have a feeling BUILD is going to be very disappointing for you.

"So what'll be in Threshold? The two things Thurrott says are a way of running Metro apps on the desktop and a reinstatement of the Start menu. Our sources say that's only sort of true, and that it won't be the Start menu as such but rather something new. Start menuesque, perhaps, but not a literal Start menu."

- Peter Bright.

I'm also one of those who thinks the menu we'll get isn't going to be the same exact one from 7 but we'll see. Rumors are they haven't finished their plans around that yet.

Fritzly said,
He said "start menu" not "W7 start menu"....

"start menu" rather implies the old menu MSFT cut out. We don't even know if it'll be called a "menu" or not. Chances are, it'll be a setting for the Start Screen.

I have been using windows 8 for an year and every time when i go to IE in tiles view i close it and come back to desktop view, yesterday i tried the new IE browser and totally stunned, did not even expected the speed. Its loading before i plan for next click.

techbeck said,

Would be nice if the OS could auto detect what device you are using and adjust to use Metro or a Start Menu.

No thanks, I'd rather make that decision for myself, since I want the Start Screen on my stationary computers. But it would be cool to have the option nonetheless.

DConnell said,

No thanks, I'd rather make that decision for myself, since I want the Start Screen on my stationary computers. But it would be cool to have the option nonetheless.

There would be a manual option as well.

They really did make It better. I even can load up Café World in it well (which should be a new benchmark feat lol). It worked better than Firefox where the game would just hang and needed refreshing.

That is possible to do that because if Windows can detect that you are using an SSD and make necessary adjustment then they can make it to detect if you have a touch screen or not.

techbeck said,

Would be nice if the OS could auto detect what device you are using and adjust to use Metro or a Start Menu.

OK, I'm using my Surface Pro, which would I use? Considering this device can be used on your lap with just touch, on your lap with the keyboard primarily as a laptop, and docked or connected to a big screen as a desktop, which Start experience should Windows automatically select for me?

Ideas Man said,

OK, I'm using my Surface Pro, which would I use? Considering this device can be used on your lap with just touch, on your lap with the keyboard primarily as a laptop, and docked or connected to a big screen as a desktop, which Start experience should Windows automatically select for me?

Exactly. Having the OS pick and choose and throw the user around like that would be the worst thing ever. And it's one reason among many, that Microsoft has a unifying UI. One that can encompass multiple devices, and any peripherals that the user may be using.

Quite obviously the OS should not "decide" what to use but, for example, open a window with two options: use what the OS suggests and another options allowing you to override the suggestion and manually choose.
Or, to oversimplify, option one is what the OS suggests, option two the other GUI.

Fritzly said,
Quite obviously the OS should not "decide" what to use but, for example, open a window with two options: use what the OS suggests and another options allowing you to override the suggestion and manually choose.
Or, to oversimplify, option one is what the OS suggests, option two the other GUI.

Or we can just accept that Microsoft is ready for new things? Why continue to fight it when MSFT isn't backing away?

Dot Matrix said,

Exactly. Having the OS pick and choose and throw the user around like that would be the worst thing ever. And it's one reason among many, that Microsoft has a unifying UI. One that can encompass multiple devices, and any peripherals that the user may be using.

Would be handy for those systems who have detachable KBs. Would be an option to auto or choose a default. Just an idea and no more far fetched than other thoughts out there.

techbeck said,

Would be handy for those systems who have detachable KBs. Would be an option to auto or choose a default. Just an idea and no more far fetched than other thoughts out there.

You're never going to get that. Metro isn't an option for the same reason the desktop isn't an option in earlier versions of Windows.

Dot Matrix said,

Or we can just accept that Microsoft is ready for new things? Why continue to fight it when MSFT isn't backing away?

And what,is wrong,with giving people options? After all it is what made Windows successful.... as the ones who were around at the time remember very well. Companies are not monasteries, they go where their clients want.

Dot Matrix said,

Still convinced that the Win7 Start Menu is coming back? I have a feeling BUILD is going to be very disappointing for you.

And for millions of other desktop users who were hoping that microsoft would get their act together and make windows 8.x into something worth using instead of the user-hostile failure that it currently is.

Dot Matrix said,

Exactly. Having the OS pick and choose and throw the user around like that would be the worst thing ever. And it's one reason among many, that Microsoft has a unifying UI. One that can encompass multiple devices, and any peripherals that the user may be using.

Yes we must FORCE users to adapt to something they want nothing to do with, don't give them a choice, choice is bad for the user, it's our way or the highway!

/s