Windows Blue (build 9364) Start screen video shows new features

Now that the cat is out of the bag and Windows Blue build 9364 has been leaked, we are seeing all sorts of new features be uncovered with Windows Blue and one individual has captured it all on video for your viewing pleasure. 

The video posted above shows the leaked build demoed on a touch-screen device (the OS is being displayed using an RDP connection so the lag is not representative of performance) and you can see a few new features as the individual scrolls through the modern UI.

One of the new features is that if you swipe down, you can access all of the apps and the video also shows how you can create small tiles in a way that is similar to that of Windows Phone 8.

Seeing that the build is now out in the wild, we fully expect many more features to be uncovered over the next few weeks. While Microsoft had done a great job at keeping this update out of the public domain, that barrier fell this morning as build 9364 made its way to the Internet

Source: YouTube

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Great to see that windows blue is coming pogressing, but why hasn't Microsoft changed the desktop icons and folder styles to keep it inline with the overwall new os new look, it just looks outdated,

So glad the Windows Blue videos are starting to show up on YouTube. Best to watch them as soon as they are posted before Microsoft asks YouTube to pull them down.

They are on the right track when it comes to the modern UI for touch devices. But they have to make a decision on what to do with the desktop. It can't remain a seperate and disconnected experience. It most definatly shouldnt have Aero. First step should be to make it feel more modern but of course that isnt enough. The way I see it there are two choices:

1. Integrate it into the new windows UI. Have the desktop be a productivity environment in Windows 8. Allow users to boot up to this screen and perhaps even bring back a start button that pops up a smaller version of the startscreen ergo a startmenu...

2. Dumb it down and make sure the modern UI has everything non-touch users want. Starting with adding a switch that brings up a taskbar in the modern UI. On this taskbar they could add the charms, app specific commands and the app-switcher. With the windows logo charm being all the way on the left of course Naturally the desktop should remain as an environment to run legacy apps but take away all its other functionality (such as notifications, windows explorer, etc) and bring those features to the modern UI.

Microsoft really needs to make a choice. On the one hand I'm fine with having a double experience but it does seem to confuse many users.

Personally, I think they're going to eventually move WinRT into the Desktop, so Desktop apps will also be portable between x86 and ARM and be installable through the store. Perhaps have it so some apps have full screen versions and also windowed, desktop versions.

brianshapiro said,
Personally, I think they're going to eventually move WinRT into the Desktop, so Desktop apps will also be portable between x86 and ARM and be installable through the store. Perhaps have it so some apps have full screen versions and also windowed, desktop versions.

That seems to be the direction they're going for now. Which means Windows has two different methodes with the touch mode being forced as standard for everyone.

There are just two things wrong with this:

1. Right now the majority is non-touch so they're getting a lot of unhappy users.

2. Many users find this confusing. Because it isn't just two modes for the same applications. They're compleetly seperate meaning its the same experience as running one OS on another. Its not something that the average consumer finds easy to get used to.

Its very sad because Windows 8's modern UI is a great to use. But in its current state its just not ready to be the main user experience. As its underwhelming and confusing on non-touch. So either make the modern UI more accessible for non-touch or make the desktop a more integrated part of the experience. Because right now I fear Microsoft is going to lose its consumers. First these consumers will have unhappy experiences on non-touch and by the time they'll make the transition to touch they'll ignore Windows 8 because of the non-touch experience.

Klownicle said,
This is more a video of showing me what it can't do as they continually try and swipe...
I can't tell what hardware he's using. Seemed like a terrible touch screen combined with RDP.

AmazingRando said,
If he would've swiped up and down a few more thousand times I think I would've gotten the gist a bit better.
It is amazing how it's always the mouthbreathers post the first videos. Take 5 minutes and decide what features you're going to show... the record that.

Kinda makes you wonder why they didn't offer more sizes of tiles right from the start considering it had obviously been planned for Windows Phone 8 for a long time.

The problem with smaller tiles is that they can't have a text description, which impedes usability - that's why Android and iOS both include text labels for icons, like Microsoft did with Windows 8. As for larger tiles, they're not really necessary (the desktop tile is the only tile I'd consider having that large) and Microsoft was trying to make the API as simple as possible - that's one of the reasons it didn't allow users to have 50/50 snaps. Based on the feedback Microsoft has obviously decided to change strategy and introduce more flexibility.

theyarecomingforyou said,
The problem with smaller tiles is that they can't have a text description, which impedes usability - that's why Android and iOS both include text labels for icons, like Microsoft did with Windows 8. As for larger tiles, they're not really necessary (the desktop tile is the only tile I'd consider having that large) and Microsoft was trying to make the API as simple as possible - that's one of the reasons it didn't allow users to have 50/50 snaps. Based on the feedback Microsoft has obviously decided to change strategy and introduce more flexibility.
Fortunately you're wrong about smaller tile suffering from not having text labels. For items that screen area and label is a waste smaller tiles work wonders. The thing you miss is the user sets up this screen. They have to choose what goes where and at what size. If you just want to have quick access to items you don't use often or items that you just want a number on, like messages and e-mail it works wonders.

I agree about the 50/50 split though. I don't think the snap is terrible as it is right now. But in some cases a 50 50 works out nicely.

In the end its about letting the user decide if you feel the need for text labels you're welcome to never use the smaller tile. I will use them in abundance in a group of my utilities and my games. In the end Android and iOS offer little options. At least android has widgets. Considering that's the same layout of Window 3.1 by no means do I think it's the way to go, it's just not to forward thinking.

theyarecomingforyou said,
The problem with smaller tiles is that they can't have a text description, which impedes usability

You've clearly never used WP8. Small tiles increase usability and flexibility and the lack of text labels is irrelevant because it's the user that decides what apps they want to pin with small tiles. Some tiles are just better suited to the smaller size because they don't display much information but are used frequently enough to deserve a permanent place on the Start Screen. The Windows Store tile is a good example of this.

Android and iOS display text next to their icons because they're stuck with a dated UI that reduces customisability and usability.

jakem1 said,
You've clearly never used WP8. Small tiles increase usability and flexibility and the lack of text labels is irrelevant because it's the user that decides what apps they want to pin with small tiles.

Small tiles may work well for phones that have a very limited display area but that isn't an issue on most tablets or desktop computers, where text is useful to help identify programs. I just don't think it's the best direction to be going in, especially when Microsoft has pushed a style of icons devoid of gradients, colours or complex patterns. Perhaps if Windows 8 / Blue took advantage of a mouse driven interface and expanded tiles with larger graphics and text descriptions on mouse hover then it would be a real step forward but Microsoft is too busy optimising Windows for touch.

jakem1 said,
Android and iOS display text next to their icons because they're stuck with a dated UI that reduces customisability and usability.

You say that as if having text descriptions is a bad thing, when that's the standard model for Android, iOS, Windows Phone and Windows. It's as if you're suggesting the future of computing is tiny icons, when it is at best complementary to the existing system.

theyarecomingforyou said,
The problem with smaller tiles is that they can't have a text description, which impedes usability - that's why Android and iOS both include text labels for icons, [...]

It's funny you mention that because since I got my iPhone in October, I've been wanting a way to hide those text labels. They make the homescreen look worse to me because of how they interact with backgrounds. I understand they're needed for some people, but many of us do just fine with only icons

I'm already loving my windows 8 on my DESKTOP and with all these new features i'm sure windows 8 BLUE with be a killer. I hope they enable snap in feature for 1280*1024 in this build...

ttterminator said,
I'm already loving my windows 8 on my DESKTOP and with all these new features i'm sure windows 8 BLUE with be a killer. I hope they enable snap in feature for 1280*1024 in this build...

Seriously? Have you actually used 8? Im sorry but its horrendously rubbish for the desktop user, you cant make me believe you like it.

heatlesssun said,
I use Windows 8 on keyboard and mouse driven desktops everyday and it works just fine for me.

Cool, its not working for me because I miss functions that were common place when i started my desktop PC. I realise Im becoming one of those people who dont seem to like new innovations and maybe that means that my time is over. I accept that I cant move on, Im done commenting on 8.

Orange Battery said,

Seriously? Have you actually used 8? Im sorry but its horrendously rubbish for the desktop user, you cant make me believe you like it.


I also used it on both standard desktops and laptops for a few months before eventually getting a Surface Pro. It was perfectly fine without any touch at all.

Orange Battery said,

Seriously? Have you actually used 8? Im sorry but its horrendously rubbish for the desktop user, you cant make me believe you like it.

Ive used all the previews of Windows 8 and have it on laptops and desktops. I much prefer it to Windows 8

Orange Battery said,

Cool, its not working for me because I miss functions that were common place when i started my desktop PC. I realise Im becoming one of those people who dont seem to like new innovations and maybe that means that my time is over. I accept that I cant move on, Im done commenting on 8.

What functions are missing from 7 that arent in 8?

efjay said,
"Wake me up when they release Windows 9 with the start menu back" comments incoming....

I wish my friend but I think Microsoft is in the "Yahoo" state of mind. They think they know what the consumer wants.

efjay said,
"Bunch of whining because people are afraid of change, even if it gives you more flexibility and features" comments incoming....

Fixed it for you

JHBrown said,

I wish my friend but I think Microsoft is in the "Yahoo" state of mind. They think they know what the consumer wants.

You have it backwards. Microsoft probably spends more time on market research than the other major OS players. Historically, Apple et al have criticized Microsoft for building around users instead of pushing something new/unexpected/original (iow, something that users couldn't say they "want" in the first place because it doesn't exist yet).

Around the 3:15 mark it looks like he is on the desktop but still can swipe up to get an extra menu on top of the taskbar.
Does this mean more interaction between desktop and Metro?

TPreston said,
No wonder its so slow then he must be remoting in to another pc or vm

I was about to say this guy is the worst ever at using a touch screen. But it must be the remote desktop causing swipes to not work.

Also heres a vid of the new PC Settings screen (at 1:45.):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8FaZ4FPlyAU

MS have changed almost every single settings screen and added a ton of new screens and features. And theres finally a network settings screen too, so i'm happy. One of the big complaints for 8/RT on touch devices was that you had to go in to the clumsy desktop to change many settings. This seems to have been fixed.

Heres screenshots of every PC Settings screen:
http://www.microsoftcollection...039;/6.3.9364.0/English/Pro