Windows MultiPoint Server 2010 RC2 leaks

Microsoft announced Windows MultiPoint Server 2010 in early December 2009 with the promise of "one PC per classroom".

The idea of MultiPoint Server is that it will reduce the cost for many businesses and schools worldwide. The solution works by having a central point for one server to exist and multiple mice, keyboards, speakers and monitors attached to the one system. Each session provides a user with a unique Remote Desktop to the MultiPoint Server. The product is a brain child of Microsoft Research India. Microsoft officials demonstrated 16 monitors simultaneously playing 720P HD video using the processing power of one PC (an Intel Core i7 system) in 2009. Microsoft is amining the shared resource computing technology primarily at schools but claims businesses who wish to train staff on technologies could benefit too. The cost savings are huge as each session would only require an additional monitor, keyboard, mouse and a user license to use the Remote Desktop session in MultiPoint.

This week a beta build of the new server operating system leaked online for all to see. The build, named RC2, became available on popular file sharing networks and BitTorrent sites early this week. As the operating system is simply a Server OS there's little to see. Windows MultiPoint Server 2010 is built on top of Windows Server 2008 R2.

Microsoft expects to make the final edition available to schools around the world in the first half of 2010 according to Ira Snyder, General Manager, Windows MultiPoint Server.

View: More information on Windows MultiPoint Server 2010

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What classroom has 6 students in it? I wonder if this environment is robust enough to allow "Anne" to connect multiple MultiPoint servers together with all of the student's personal My Docs synchronized to one location so "Anne" doesn't have to get up and move to each MultiPoint island and login to grade the student tests. Sounds like this thing could get complicated pretty fast.

Actually, NComputing systems do run on servers and they support both directly wired connections (PCI card or USB) and remote networked connections (over Ethernet). So users can run on server hosts that are back in a datacenter (host does not need to be in same room with their L-series). You can even run the networked connected L-series systems on a virtual machine running on a server. With multiple VMs on a server you can get 100s of users running on one physical machine...

The drawback for Ncomputing is that it's not server mountable. It can only be wired directly to a PC that is usually located within a single room. If we see good DOMAIN bootup times (the XP full boot on Ncomputing devices takes as long as however many computers are connected to it), and if it has over 15 PC support (Ncomputing can do up to 30 on a single PC), and if it has OK overall speed, and if it works with DirectX video correctly (many things that access DirectX virtualized do not work, and if does not cost more than 15 $650.00 new towers, it may be an option.

dimithrak said,
Nice concept.. but that Server will have to be out of this world to manage the load of a business environment!

It is aimed at school classrooms, not businesses.

NComputing's been doing this for years, and they did announce support for WMS but they also support other operating systems (plus Linux), and they also have more ways to connect (besides just USB).

drsrca said,
NComputing's been doing this for years, and they did announce support for WMS but they also support other operating systems (plus Linux), and they also have more ways to connect (besides just USB).

But NComputing is absolute bull crap

Axel said,
...but can it play Crysis... IN SIX DIFFERENT SESSIONS???

Put a good enough video card and RAM and you'd probably have a good chance lol Although obviously it's not meant for that lol

Seems pretty cool. Would definitely be useful and save a lot of money on hardware. It does take away from the human experience in the classroom. If you're a good teacher, you'd know the right balance of human to computer interaction.

Definitely a good step towards reducing costs and the effects on the environment. Less hardware, less waste. It could still use a little work with user experience. That's up to the school board to determine what goes into the users accounts.

morphen said,
so, the montior is connected by a USB monitor adapter?
thats the only way i can figure this out :p

The last picture shows some kind of adapter. I'm guessing that you plug all your hardware into it and then connect by usb.

The first thing that came to mind to me was how are you going to hook up all that hardware. First I thought usb hubs for everything but forgot about the monitors. Now that you said that, I realized there are adapters. That'll make it really easy. You can easily get a whole class on one pc. It just comes down to performance after that.

256mb of ram? what kind of rubbish server is this!

on the other note how the hell this thing got installed in the first place i thought windows vista and later would refuse to install in any thing less then 512mb of system ram

Ci7 said,
256mb of ram? what kind of rubbish server is this!

on the other note how the hell this thing got installed in the first place i thought windows vista and later would refuse to install in any thing less then 512mb of system ram

I'm guessing there's more RAM than that. It's probably assigning 256MB per user account so that you don't have to have so much RAM to work. I think it's adjustable too or at least should be. If you have a classroom of 20 kids all on one PC with maybe 8GB of RAM than you have to break it up.

Ci7 said,
256mb of ram? what kind of rubbish server is this!

on the other note how the hell this thing got installed in the first place i thought windows vista and later would refuse to install in any thing less then 512mb of system ram

This is not Vista or Windows 7, this is based on Windows Server 2008 which gives option to install in "Core" mode which doesn't install much of the GUI stuff anyway. You can run it without the usual explorer shell too on just CLI using PowerShell. Since all its doing is serving, it can run like this while the GUI will come on the monitors connected.

The adapter shown in the pic is a simple KVM adapter.

Ci7 said,
256mb of ram? what kind of rubbish server is this!

on the other note how the hell this thing got installed in the first place i thought windows vista and later would refuse to install in any thing less then 512mb of system ram


I'd put a large sum of money on that screenshot being taken from a virtual machine.