Windows Phone 7 gets the jailbreak treatment

Microsoft launched their Windows Phone 7 to the market last week, and hackers have already compromised the operating system to allow unauthorized code to be run, allowing users to run applications that Microsoft would normally not approve of.

An Australian hacker named Chris Walshie discovered a method to run native, unmanaged code on a retail Windows Phone 7 phone, which could allow for future applications to be run on the device. As reported by Long Zheng of istartedsomething, Walshie found a DLL called "Microsoft.Phone.InteropServices", which if exploited could provide users root access to the device.

Jailbreaking is very popular amongst iDevices, enabling users to run unauthorized code that Apple wouldn't normally allow on their App Store. Jailbreaking of iDevices allows for themes, tweaks, any many more applications that will probably never be available on the App Store.

As Long suggests, the benefits of jailbreaking Windows Phone 7 could mean that users can gain access to the microphone or camera, or even overriding the Bing search bar, allowing for users to customize their search engine.

The development for jailbreaking Windows Phone 7 is still ways off and could be months before users develop any useful applications, like Cydia for iOS.

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53 Comments

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Mouettus said,

go away, troll!

The same thing happened with Android and iOS. You took it as an insult because you are a Microsoft Fanboy. The user community always builds something better than the big companies.

You go away you uneducated fool.

UndergroundWire said,
Maybe now someone can put a decent UI on the phones.
Why don't you like it and what would you rather see instead?

zeke009 said,
Why don't you like it and what would you rather see instead?

Anything but the live tiles. There is something extremely childish about that user interface. I played around with the T-Mobile and AT&T versions this weekend and I was not impressed at all. It's no wonder theses phones weren't a huge success at launch. Besides people hearing it's a "Microsoft phone" then they see the UI, these phones won't sell.

On a side note, the two thing I did like is the Office and Zune integration. If Microsoft was smart (which obviously there not), they would open up Office and Zune to other platforms. especially the Zune service. I mean seriously, don't you want more people to grab for the Zune Pass?

UndergroundWire said,

Anything but the live tiles. There is something extremely childish about that user interface. I played around with the T-Mobile and AT&T versions this weekend and I was not impressed at all. It's no wonder theses phones weren't a huge success at launch. Besides people hearing it's a "Microsoft phone" then they see the UI, these phones won't sell.

On a side note, the two thing I did like is the Office and Zune integration. If Microsoft was smart (which obviously there not), they would open up Office and Zune to other platforms. especially the Zune service. I mean seriously, don't you want more people to grab for the Zune Pass?

I actually like the live tiles, they provide everything you need at a glance. I tried the HTC HD7 last week, was very impressed and will be buying one in a couple of weeks.

IMHO I think a lot US Mobile users compare everything to the iPhone and expect every other phone to be an exact copy of it features wise.

Microsoft have done something radically different with WP7 and not just given us rows and rows of icons.

neo158 said,

I actually like the live tiles, they provide everything you need at a glance. I tried the HTC HD7 last week, was very impressed and will be buying one in a couple of weeks.

IMHO I think a lot US Mobile users compare everything to the iPhone and expect every other phone to be an exact copy of it features wise.

Microsoft have done something radically different with WP7 and not just given us rows and rows of icons.


I hate that ****. I wish people would stop comparing everything to the iPhone. The iPhone interface is getting really dated now. Android however managed to be innovative by introducing Widgets. Major props to Google for that.

As for Microsoft, the Live tiles is just really simple looking. I was not impressed at all. I'm curious how these phone will do in 6 months time. If the user community can change the UI and come up with something better, I will explore it again. By the way, the best site to stay afloat on the development process, themes, jail breaking, etc for any phone is http://www.xda-developers.com/

UndergroundWire said,

I hate that ****. I wish people would stop comparing everything to the iPhone. The iPhone interface is getting really dated now. Android however managed to be innovative by introducing Widgets. Major props to Google for that.

As for Microsoft, the Live tiles is just really simple looking. I was not impressed at all. I'm curious how these phone will do in 6 months time. If the user community can change the UI and come up with something better, I will explore it again. By the way, the best site to stay afloat on the development process, themes, jail breaking, etc for any phone is http://www.xda-developers.com/

I also hate it when people compare everything to the iPhone, but that's exactly what does happen.

While I do like Android I think that widgets can look cluttered if too many of them are used on one homescreen, not to mention how odd it looks when different widgets have different UIs. What I'm trying to say is that WP7 has the uniformity in the interface that Android lacks.

Live Tiles are meant to be simple looking as they just provide the information you need to see, nothing more. Were you just expecting a rehash of the WinMo 6.5 interface?

Microsoft may add some form of UI skinning in an update, but right now the focus is on getting the core experience right, then they can focus on getting the features added.

dont care, dont want it, never will, ill pay for my things im not going to steal + ive done jailbreaks on my old iphone and ipod touch, and well...it drastically slows it down

auziez said,
dont care, dont want it, never will, ill pay for my things im not going to steal + ive done jailbreaks on my old iphone and ipod touch, and well...it drastically slows it down

Many people who JB are not necessarly pirates. I as a developer may want to write apps that I don't want to put to marketplace and so jailbreaking allows me to develop and use without bugging anyone else.

I'll check this out, but I think that this function can only be called by Microsoft or it's OEM partners.
Regular apps will just get access denied exception.

zeke009 said,
Most interesting part of this for me is that it may open the door to installing updates that carriers delay.

Have you not been listening? Microsoft will prevent carriers from delaying updates....

Yakuzing said,

Have you not been listening? Microsoft will prevent carriers from delaying updates....
Have you not been reading, carriers can do so. The question is will they be able to do so for 1 update and have to release the next (rollup) or can they delay indefinitely. What was announced is not what we're getting in this area.

Check out sites other than Neowin.

zeke009 said,
Have you not been reading, carriers can do so. The question is will they be able to do so for 1 update and have to release the next (rollup) or can they delay indefinitely. What was announced is not what we're getting in this area.

Check out sites other than Neowin.

Source?

AFAIK all updates come direct from Microsoft. Carriers have no say in whether updates are delayed or not, as they are not allowed to load devices with trial software and useless apps that no one wants or needs.

An Australian hacker named Chris Walshie discovered a method to run native, unmanaged code on a retail Windows Phone 7 phone, which could allow for future applications to be run on the device. As reported by Long Zheng of istartedsomething, Walshie found a DLL called "Microsoft.Phone.InteropServices", which if exploited could provide users root access to the device.

Just a note, right now to be able to sideload an app using that requires a developer's certificate.

If you don't have one, this method is quite useless..for now.

Just join the developer program and unlock your phone for side loading. 99 bucks and it gets you the tools to publish on WP7, Windows and XBL marketplaces.

Digitalx said,
probably just do like xbox and ban everyones phone into a brick lol!

There's two things to this.

1. The phone its self cannot be locked unless there is a tripping mechanism in Windows Phone 7, and 2. They'd have to do it through the carrier, unless they lock you out of the Marketplace like Apple does.

Sevan said,

There's two things to this.

1. The phone its self cannot be locked unless there is a tripping mechanism in Windows Phone 7, and 2. They'd have to do it through the carrier, unless they lock you out of the Marketplace like Apple does.

I don't see why Microsoft wouldn't have such an ability in their operating system.

The file is actually used when developers run code from Viaual Studio or XNA, so theoretically it was already possible from the start.

I hope MS remains neutral on jailbroken WP7. Afterall its your problem if you are running an app that slows down your phone

Riva said,
I hope MS remains neutral on jailbroken WP7. Afterall its your problem if you are running an app that slows down your phone

Or you could just get an N900 and not have to worry about needing a jailbroken phone as you have total access to the phone, bios, firmware, etc.

ZekeComa said,

Or you could just get an N900 and not have to worry about needing a jailbroken phone as you have total access to the phone, bios, firmware, etc.

Aren't those things hundreds of dollars?

Using the InteropServices assembly will fail the automatic testing. As such, you won't ever get a jailbreaking tool onto the phone, except by sideloading, which again requires a developer account and an USB connection to unlock the device.

Thats not the same thing as jailbreaking. This was a feature MSFT was very open about being a part later, so it's just early hacking of it.

Yeah, you can run native code but the code still has to get on the phone via side loading on a developer device it's not like people can do this on device. The security of the os is still intact for now.

Yep mocax bingo your buying an experience if you dont like that experience buy another mobile telephone.... your not buying the right to do what you like with the os......

The Guardian said,
IMO, someone who jailbreaks their device will be smart enough to know that the OS is not at fault if there any problems or if it is sluggish.

Your opinion is incorrect for plenty of users.

agreenbhm said,

Your opinion is incorrect for plenty of users.

well this far it's probably true, but yea, most users who jailbreak an iDevice don't know anything about what their doing, how it's done and so on...

mocax said,
and people experiencing sluggishness, due to the unauthorized programs, will blame the OS.....

hahaha true! +1

The Guardian said,
IMO, someone who jailbreaks their device will be smart enough to know that the OS is not at fault if there any problems or if it is sluggish.

My friend, who jailbreaks his iPhone, knows nothing about IT or technology. He certainly wouldn't know not to blame the OS.

flashnuke said,
An opinion is incorrect? Makes perfect sense.. not

Sure it does. Opinions can, in fact, be wrong. It's because there really is only one factual reality, and opinions are interpretations of that reality. If you can misinterpret, you can have an incorrect opinion.

There's a notion that "opinion" are simply a matter of whether something is good or bad, or whether you like something or not. And sure, those sorts of opinions can't be wrong, because they're about your own personal feelings.

However, if you actually read the post with the 'opinion', before you jumped in to sound like an illiterate troll, you'd realize that it wasn't that kind of opinion. But don't let me stop you from being daft.

Joshie said,

Sure it does. Opinions can, in fact, be wrong. It's because there really is only one factual reality, and opinions are interpretations of that reality. If you can misinterpret, you can have an incorrect opinion.

There's a notion that "opinion" are simply a matter of whether something is good or bad, or whether you like something or not. And sure, those sorts of opinions can't be wrong, because they're about your own personal feelings.

However, if you actually read the post with the 'opinion', before you jumped in to sound like an illiterate troll, you'd realize that it wasn't that kind of opinion. But don't let me stop you from being daft.

Please tell me you aren't serious? Opinions can not be right nor wrong. If he said something along the lines like Fact is if you Jail break your phone the OS is no longer at fault for being sluggish, then yes he would have been incorrect. There is no FACT that if you Jail break your phone it will in return become sluggish so his opinion is which in fact that.. an opinion. Maybe you need to learn what a fact actually means before you right some dumb non-sense on how an opinion can be wrong.

I think Microsoft shouldnt bother with "locking" the jailbreak but just drop support for jailbreaked phones (just like all companies do, when you mess up with their product).

AKLP said,
I think Microsoft shouldnt bother with "locking" the jailbreak but just drop support for jailbreaked phones (just like all companies do, when you mess up with their product).

people who jb don't usually need the support, but I do agree with you

AKLP said,
I think Microsoft shouldnt bother with "locking" the jailbreak but just drop support for jailbreaked phones (just like all companies do, when you mess up with their product).
well, the thing is, the way the unsigned code was executed is trough a security flaw that could probably be exploited for reasons not so friendly to the user.
MS(and any other company) will have to fix these holes anything else would look bad even though they would be allowing people to jailbreak

Nistic said,

people who jb don't usually need the support, but I do agree with you

I disagree. Most of the people I know with jailbroken devices are teens/pre-teens who did it to get free apps and had it done by 'one of their friends/cousins who knows about computers'

Leonick said,
well, the thing is, the way the unsigned code was executed is trough a security flaw that could probably be exploited for reasons not so friendly to the user.
MS(and any other company) will have to fix these holes anything else would look bad even though they would be allowing people to jailbreak

Yup. If it's a security flaw, it needs to be fixed. When it's fixed, people will probably betch that it ruins the hack, but it's just how it goes.

Mr aldo said,
I guess now we will see if Microsoft doesn't want people to jailbreak Windows Phone 7.
Of course the don't want that, have you seen the reaction to the kinect hacks (opensource drivers and all that)?

Mr aldo said,
I guess now we will see if Microsoft doesn't want people to jailbreak Windows Phone 7.

The only issue I can see is if jailbreaking a WP7 device would be the possibility of exploiting xbox live. If that's the case then we may see people banned from xbox live for jailbreaking their phones.

Leonick said,
Of course the don't want that, have you seen the reaction to the kinect hacks (opensource drivers and all that)?
That is more of a hardware thing (well, I know currently it is just a driver, but you know what I mean), and Microsoft wants the Kinect to only be used for the Xbox 360 (at least for now), and don't want people repurposing it.

I don't see the connection between that and WP7 jailbreaking.